What is Orilissa?

Orilissa (elagolix) is a brand-name prescription medication that's used to treat moderate to severe pain caused by endometriosis in women.

Orilissa comes as a tablet that's taken by mouth once or twice daily. The tablet is available in two strengths: 150 mg and 200 mg.

In clinical studies, Orilissa reduced symptoms of dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation) in 43% to 72% of women with endometriosis after three months of treatment. It also reduced pelvic pain that was not related to menstruation in 50% to 58% of women.

FDA approval

Orilissa was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in July 2018.

Orilissa is only available as a brand-name medication. It's not available in a generic form.

Orilissa contains the drug elagolix. Elagolix belongs to a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonists.

Orilissa can cause mild or serious side effects. The following list contains some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Orilissa. This list does not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Orilissa, or tips on how to deal with a troubling side effect, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of Orilissa can include:

  • hot flashes
  • night sweats
  • headache
  • nausea
  • trouble sleeping
  • amenorrhea (no menstruation)
  • mood swings
  • depression
  • anxiety
  • joint pain

Some of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they're more severe or don't go away, talk to your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Orilissa aren't common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you're having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include the following:

  • Bone loss. Symptoms can include:
    • bone fractures
    • decreased bone density when measured on bone scans
  • Liver problems. Symptoms can include:
    • fatigue
    • pain in your abdomen (belly)
    • increased liver enzymes on blood tests
    • yellowing of your skin and the whites of your eyes
  • Mood changes. Symptoms can include:
    • anxiety
    • depression
    • suicidal thoughts

Suicide prevention

  • If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours a day at 1-800-273-8255.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here's some detail on some of the side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Orilissa. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • angioedema (swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet)
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Orilissa. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you're having a medical emergency.

Rash

Some people who take Orilissa can have a rash caused by a mild allergic reaction (see "Allergic reaction" above). In clinical studies, this rash occurred in about 6% of people who took Orilissa.

Most people don't need to stop taking the medication if they develop a rash. If you get a rash while taking Orilissa and it becomes severe or bothersome, talk with your doctor.

Menstruation changes

During their period, women who take Orilissa might bleed less and for a shorter period of time than they did while not taking the drug. In clinical studies, a complete loss of menstruation (amenorrhea) occurred in 6% to 52% of women taking Orilissa over six months.

These menstruation changes may also make it harder to know if you're pregnant. If you think you could be pregnant, you should have a pregnancy test. If you become pregnant while taking Orilissa, you'll need to stop taking the drug.

Weight gain

Some people who take Orilissa may gain weight. In clinical studies, 3% to 4% of women taking Orilissa experienced weight gain.

If you have questions about weight gain while taking Orilissa, talk with your doctor.

Bone loss

Taking Orilissa can cause decreased bone density, which may make your bones weaker. Because of this side effect, Orilissa can only be used for up to 24 months. If you take a higher dosage of Orilissa (200 mg twice daily), or if you have liver problems, you should only use it for up to six months.

If you've had bone fractures (breaks) in the past or you have other risks for bone fractures, your doctor may do tests to measure your bone density while you take Orilissa.

No, Orilissa does not cause menopause. However, it can cause symptoms similar to those of menopause.

The most common side effects of Orilissa are hot flashes and night sweats. In clinical studies, these side effects occurred in 24% to 46% of women who took Orilissa. Up to 2.5% of women stopped taking the drug because of this side effect.

Orilissa can also decrease menstrual bleeding or make your period stop altogether. In clinical studies, a complete loss of menstruation (amenorrhea) occurred in up to 52% of women taking Orilissa over six months.

These side effects are more common when higher Orilissa doses are used. If these side effects become severe or concerning, talk with your doctor.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Orilissa to treat certain conditions. Prescription drugs may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that's approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Orilissa for endometriosis pain

Orilissa is FDA-approved for treating moderate to severe pain caused by endometriosis in women. With endometriosis, tissue similar to the lining of the uterus grows in the abdomen outside of the uterus.

In clinical studies, Orilissa reduced symptoms of dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation) in 43% to 72% of women with endometriosis after three months of treatment. It also reduced pelvic pain that was not related to menstruation in 50% to 58% of women.

Uses that are not approved

Orilissa may be used off-label to treat heavy menstrual bleeding in women with uterine fibroids. One clinical study found that Orilissa reduced menstrual blood loss by up to 98% in women with uterine fibroids.

The Orilissa dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on the type and severity of the condition you're using Orilissa to treat. It will also depend on other health conditions you may have.

Ultimately, your doctor will prescribe the lowest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to suit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Orilissa come as tablets that are taken by mouth. The tablets come in two strengths: 150 mg and 200 mg.

Dosage for endometriosis pain

For initial treatment, Orilissa 150 mg once daily is typically used. If this dosage does not relieve your symptoms, your doctor may increase the dosage to a maximum of 200 mg twice daily.

If your symptoms include painful intercourse, your doctor may start you on the maximum dosage of 200 mg twice daily.

Orilissa can be taken with or without food. It should be taken at about the same time each day.

If you have decreased liver function, your doctor may prescribe a lower dosage of Orilissa. But if you have severe liver problems, you may not be able to take Orilissa.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you remember it on the same day. Then take the next dose on its regular schedule. Never take double doses to catch up. This can cause dangerous side effects.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

The maximum length of time that Orilissa should be used is 24 months. This is because Orilissa can decrease your bone density. This means it can make your bones weaker. How long you can take the drug depends on the dosage you take and other health conditions you may have.

To prevent severe bone loss and fractures, the length of time Orilissa can be used is limited as follows:

  • If you take 150 mg once daily, Orilissa can be taken for up to 24 months.
  • If you take 200 mg twice daily, Orilissa can be taken for up to 6 months.
  • If you have moderately decreased liver function, Orilissa can be taken for up to 6 months.

Other drugs are available that can treat endometriosis pain. Some may be better suited for you than others. If you're interested in finding an alternative to Orilissa, talk to your doctor to learn more about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions.

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat endometriosis pain include:

  • pain relievers, such as:
    • acetaminophen (Tylenol)
    • ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
    • naproxen (Aleve)
  • hormonal contraceptives, such as:
    • desogestrel/ethinyl estradiol (Azurette, Bekyree, Cyclessa, Viorele, and others)
    • dienogest/estradiol valerate (Natazia)
    • drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol (Gianvi, Loryna, Nikki, Vestura, Yasmin, Yaz)
    • levonorgestrel/ethinyl estradiol (Altavera, Amethia, Daysee, Lessina, Seasonique, and others)
    • norethindrone/ethinyl estradiol (Leena, Nortrel, Ortho-Novum, Ovcon, and others)
  • gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) agonists, such as:
    • goserelin (Zoladex)
    • leuprolide (Lupron Depot)
    • nafarelin (Synarel)
    • triptorelin (Trelstar)
  • progestins, such as:
    • levonorgestrel (Mirena)
    • medroxyprogesterone (Provera, Depo-Provera)
    • norethindrone (Aygestin)
  • aromatase inhibitors, such as:
    • anastrozole (Arimidex)
    • letrozole (Femara)
  • danazol

You may wonder how Orilissa compares to other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Below are comparisons between Orilissa and several medications.

Orilissa vs. Lupron

Lupron Depot is a long-acting form of Lupron that's used to treat endometriosis pain. Orilissa and Lupron Depot (leuprolide acetate) belong to different drug classes.

Orilissa is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonists. Lupron Depot, on the other hand, is a GnRH agonist.

These drugs work in a slightly different way in your body. However, they both reduce the levels of certain hormones, such as estrogen and progesterone.

Uses

Orilissa is FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe pain caused by endometriosis. Lupron Depot is FDA-approved to reduce pain and growth of endometrial tissues outside of the uterus.

Both Orilissa and Lupron Depot are used off-label in areas of uterine fibroid management.

Drug forms and administration

Orilissa comes as an oral tablet that's taken once or twice daily.

Lupron Depot comes as an injection that's given by a doctor into a muscle (intramuscular). Lupron Depot may be injected once per month or once every three months.

Side effects and risks

Orilissa and Lupron Depot have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Orilissa, with Lupron Depot, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Orilissa:
    • few unique common side effects
  • Can occur with Lupron Depot:
    • stomach upset
    • swelling (edema)
    • weight loss
    • acne
    • decreased sex drive (libido)
    • dizziness
    • memory problems
    • breast tenderness
    • vaginal inflammation
  • Can occur with both Orilissa and Lupron Depot:
    • hot flashes
    • night sweats
    • headache
    • nausea
    • mood swings
    • depression
    • anxiety
    • weight gain
    • trouble sleeping
    • joint pain
    • amenorrhea (no menstruation)

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Orilissa, with Lupron Depot, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Orilissa:
    • mood changes and suicidal thoughts
    • liver problems
  • Can occur with Lupron Depot:
    • seizures
  • Can occur with both Orilissa and Lupron Depot:
    • bone loss
    • severe allergic reaction

Effectiveness

These drugs haven't been compared in clinical studies, but both Orilissa and Lupron Depot have been found effective for treating pain caused by endometriosis.

Costs

Both Orilissa and Lupron Depot are available as brand-name drugs. Generic versions of these drugs aren't available.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Orilissa typically costs less than Lupron Depot. The actual price you'll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Orilissa vs. Mirena

Orilissa and Mirena (levonorgestrel intrauterine device) belong to different drug classes. Orilissa is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonists. Mirena is a progestin hormone.

These drugs work differently in your body to reduce levels of certain hormones, such as estrogen.

Uses

Orilissa is FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe pain caused by endometriosis.

Mirena is FDA-approved for contraception (birth control) and to reduce heavy menstrual bleeding. It's used off-label to treat endometriosis.

Drug forms and administration

Orilissa comes as an oral tablet that's taken once or twice daily.

Mirena is an intrauterine device (IUD), which is placed in the uterus. It slowly releases medication each day. A Mirena IUD can be left in place for up to five years.

Side effects and risks

Orilissa and Mirena have some similar side effects and some that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Orilissa, with Mirena, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Orilissa:
    • few unique common side effects
  • Can occur with Mirena:
    • stomach upset
    • swelling (edema)
    • weight loss
    • acne
    • decreased sex drive (libido)
    • dizziness
    • memory problems
    • breast tenderness
    • vaginal inflammation
  • Can occur with both Orilissa and Mirena:
    • hot flashes
    • night sweats
    • headache
    • nausea
    • mood swings
    • depression
    • anxiety
    • weight gain
    • trouble sleeping
    • joint pain
    • amenorrhea (no menstruation)

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Orilissa, with Mirena, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Orilissa:
    • bone loss
    • mood changes and suicidal thoughts
    • liver problems
  • Can occur with Mirena:
    • severe infection and sepsis
    • ectopic pregnancy
    • pelvic inflammatory disease
    • puncture of the wall of the uterus
    • blood clots
  • Can occur with both Orilissa and Mirena:
    • severe allergic reaction

Effectiveness

These drugs haven't been compared in clinical studies, but both Orilissa and Mirena have been found to be effective for treating pain caused by endometriosis.

Costs

Both Orilissa and Mirena are available as brand-name drugs. Generic versions of these drugs aren't available.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Orilissa typically costs more than Mirena. The actual price you'll pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Orilissa does not interact with alcohol. However, alcohol might worsen certain side effects of Orilissa, such as:

  • nausea
  • hot flashes
  • headache
  • mood swings

Alcohol may also worsen symptoms of endometriosis.

Avoid drinking excessive amounts of alcohol while you take Orilissa. If you have questions about how much alcohol is safe for you, talk with your doctor.

Orilissa can interact with several other medications. It may also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some can interfere with how well a drug works, while others can cause increased side effects.

Orilissa and other medications

Below are lists of medications that can interact with Orilissa. These lists do not contain all drugs that may interact with Orilissa.

Before taking Orilissa, be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Hormonal contraceptives

Taking Orilissa while using certain contraceptives (birth control methods) that contain the hormone estrogen might decrease how well Orilissa works. Many birth control pills contain estrogen.

Examples of contraceptives that contain estrogen include:

  • estradiol/drospirenone (Angeliq)
  • estradiol/levonorgestrel (Climara Pro)
  • estradiol valerate/dienogest (Natazia)
  • ethinyl estradiol/drospirenone (Gianvi, Loryna, Nikki, Vestura, Yasmin, Yaz)
  • ethinyl estradiol/desogestrel (Azurette, Bekyree, Cyclessa, Viorele, and others)
  • ethinyl estradiol/levonorgestrel (Altavera, Amethia, Daysee, Lessina, Seasonique, and others)
  • ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone (Leena, Nortrel, Ortho-Novum, Ovcon, and others)

Other drugs that may affect Orilissa

Taking Orilissa with certain drugs may interfere with how the body breaks down and gets rid of Orilissa. Some of these drugs may increase levels of Orilissa in the body and increase the risk of Orilissa side effects. Examples of these drugs include:

  • clarithromycin (Biaxin)
  • cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, Sandimmune)
  • erythromycin (E.E.S., Ery-Tab, Erthrocin, PCE Dispertab)
  • gemfibrozil (Lopid)
  • itraconazole (ONMEL, Sporanox)
  • ketoconazole
  • leflunomide (Arava)
  • nefazodone

Other drugs may decrease levels of Orilissa, which could make it less effective. Examples of these drugs include:

  • carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol)
  • enzalutamide (Xtandi)
  • mitotane (Lysodren)

Drugs that may be affected by Orilissa

Taking Orilissa with certain drugs may interfere with how the body breaks down and gets rid of those drugs. Orilissa may increase levels of certain drugs and increase the risk of drug side effects. Examples of these drugs include:

  • clindamycin (Cleocin)
  • dabigatran (Pradaxa)
  • digoxin (Lanoxin)
  • rivaroxaban (Xarelto)

Orilissa may also decrease levels of certain drugs, which could make them less effective. Examples of these drugs include:

  • alprazolam (Xanax)
  • amlodipine (Norvasc)
  • aripiprazole (Abilify, Aristada)
  • carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Equetro, Tegretol)
  • dolutegravir (Tivicay)
  • fentanyl (Abstral, Actiq, Duragesic, Fentora, Lazanda, Subsys)
  • rosuvastatin (Crestor)
  • zolpidem (Ambien, Edluar, Intermezzo, Zolpimist)

Orilissa and herbs and supplements

Taking Orilissa with the herb St. John's wort may reduce levels of Orilissa in the body. This could make it less effective.

Orilissa and foods

Eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice while taking Orilissa may increase levels of Orilissa in your body. This can increase the risk of dangerous side effects. Avoid consuming grapefruit products while taking Orilissa.

Orilissa tablets should be taken just as your doctor prescribed them. Don't take more or less Orilissa than prescribed without first talking with your doctor.

Timing

Orilissa can be taken at any time of day, but it should be taken at about the same time each day.

Taking Orilissa with food

Orilissa can be taken with or without food.

Can Orilissa be crushed?

The manufacturer of Orilissa hasn't stated whether it's safe to crush Orilissa. Therefore, it might be safer to avoid crushing it.

Endometriosis occurs when tissue that's similar to tissue that lines your uterus grows in your abdomen outside your uterus.

In women without endometriosis, the tissue in their uterus can thicken and break down when hormone levels in their body fluctuate. This typically occurs around the time of menstruation, and the tissue is shed in the menstrual flow.

But if you have endometriosis, the tissue growing outside of your uterus can thicken and break down, but it's not shed during menstruation. Instead, it can become trapped in your pelvic area, causing pain and irritation. (Eventually the tissue is absorbed by your body.)

How does Orilissa work?

Many treatments for endometriosis pain work by decreasing your body's levels of certain hormones, such as estrogen. The lowered hormone levels help reduce the amount of endometrial tissue that forms both inside and outside the uterus. This helps relieve endometriosis pain. It can also decrease or stop your menstrual cycle.

Orilissa also works in this way. It's a type of drug called a gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonist. It blocks the body's release of hormones called luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone. This action in turn reduces levels of estrogen and progesterone in the body, causing less tissue to build up outside of the uterus.

How long does it take to work?

Orilissa will begin to work right after you start taking it. You may notice improved symptoms in the first month of treatment, and your symptoms may continue to improve after that.

In clinical studies of Orilissa, women started reporting improved symptoms during the first month they used the drug. Their symptoms continued to improve through the second and third months of treatment.

Taking Orilissa during pregnancy is dangerous and can cause loss of the pregnancy. If you are pregnant, you should not take Orilissa. If you get pregnant while taking Orilissa, you should stop taking the medication.

Because Orilissa can change your menstrual cycle, it may be harder to tell if you're pregnant while taking the drug. If you think you might be pregnant, consider doing a pregnancy test. If you are pregnant, you'll need to stop taking Orilissa right away.

Orilissa doesn't prevent pregnancy

Orilissa is not a contraceptive and is not effective for preventing pregnancy. Because it's not safe to get pregnant while taking Orilissa, if you're able to become pregnant, you should use birth control during your treatment with the drug.

Consider using a barrier method for contraception while taking Orilissa. Contraceptives that contain estrogen, including many birth control pills, should not be used while taking Orilissa because they can make Orilissa less effective.

It isn't known if Orilissa passes into breast milk. If you're planning to breastfeed your child, you and your doctor should decide together whether you should take this drug or breastfeed.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Orilissa.

Is Orilissa a narcotic?

No, Orilissa is not a narcotic. Orilissa is in a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonists.

Like Orilissa, narcotics can be used to reduce pain, but they work in a different way than Orilissa. Narcotics are not used to treat endometriosis.

Can you get pregnant while you're taking Orilissa?

Yes, it's possible to get pregnant while taking Orilissa. Orilissa does not prevent pregnancy. Therefore, it's very important to use contraception (birth control) while taking the drug. Orilissa can cause severe harm to a pregnancy, and can even end it.

Some contraceptives, such as those containing estrogen, should not be taken while using Orilissa. Many birth control pills contain estrogen. Talk to your doctor about the best contraceptive options for you.

Does Orilissa cause menopause?

No, Orilissa does not cause menopause. However, it can cause symptoms similar to those of menopause.

The most common side effects of Orilissa are hot flashes and night sweats. In studies, these side effects occurred in 24% to 46% of women who took Orilissa. Up to 2.5% of women in the studies stopped taking Orilissa because of this side effect.

Orilissa can also decrease menstrual bleeding or stop your period completely. In clinical studies, a complete loss of menstruation (amenorrhea) occurred in up to 52% of women taking Orilissa over six months.

Is Orilissa safe to take long term?

No. Because Orilissa can cause decreased bone density, which may make your bones weaker, there are limits on how long it should be used.

Typically, Orilissa can only be used for up to 24 months. If you take a higher dose of Orilissa (200 mg twice daily), or if you have liver problems, you should only use it for up to six months. Your doctor will prescribe the treatment length that's right for you.

Taking too much of this medication can increase your risk of serious side effects.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose may include:

  • nausea
  • headache
  • hot flashes
  • anxiety
  • dizziness
  • irritability

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you've taken too much of this drug, call your doctor or seek guidance from the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or through their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Before taking Orilissa, talk with your doctor about your health history. Orilissa may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions. These conditions include:

  • Osteoporosis. If you have low bone density due to osteoporosis, you shouldn't take Orilissa. Orilissa could make your condition worse.
  • Severe liver problems. If you have a severe liver condition, you shouldn't take Orilissa. You may have a higher risk of side effects, including bone loss.
  • Depression. If you are depressed or have been depressed in the past, you may be more likely to have depression and suicidal thoughts while taking Orilissa. If you have depression or mood changes while taking Orilissa, talk with your doctor. You may need to stop taking Orilissa, be treated for your symptoms, or both.

When you get Orilissa from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically one year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee the effectiveness of the medication during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Orilissa tablets should be stored at a temperature between 36°F to 86°F (2°C and 30°C). Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Orilissa and have leftover medication, it's important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

The FDA website provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indication

Orilissa is approved by the Food and Drug Administration to help manage moderate to severe pain caused by endometriosis in people ages 18 years and older.

Mechanism of action

Orilissa belongs to a class of medications called gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) receptor antagonists. It competitively binds to the GnRH receptor in the pituitary gland. Orilissa decreases secretion of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone, which results in decreased blood levels of estradiol and progesterone.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

The time to maximum concentration of Orilissa is one hour. Orilissa's major route of metabolism is by cytochrome P450 3A (CYP3A). Minor routes include CYP2D6, CYP2C8, and uridine glucuronosyl tranferases.

The elimination half-life of Orilissa is four to six hours.

Contraindications

Orilissa is contraindicated in patients who:

  • are pregnant
  • have osteoporosis
  • have severe hepatic impairment
  • are taking strong organic anion transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B1 inhibitors, such as cyclosporine and gemfibrozil

Storage

Orilissa should be stored at a temperature between 36°F to 86°F (2°C and 30°C).

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.