Ultravate contains the active drug ingredient halobetasol. (An active drug is an ingredient in the medication that affects how the medication works.)

Ultravate is available as a brand-name and generic medication. A generic drug is an exact copy of a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

The generic form of Ultravate is called halobetasol propionate 0.05%. You'll need a prescription for it.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Ultravate to treat certain conditions. Ultravate may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that's approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Ultravate for psoriasis

Ultravate lotion is FDA-approved to treat plaque psoriasis in adults.

Plaque psoriasis occurs when your immune system is overactive, and your body makes skin cells too rapidly. (Your immune system is your body's defense against infection.) This causes excess skin cells to build up on your skin's surface. The buildup typically appears as raised, red patches that may be covered with silver or white scales. These patches are known as "plaques."

Plaques most commonly appear on your scalp, elbows, knees, and lower back, although they can show up anywhere on your body.

Effectiveness of Ultravate lotion

In clinical studies, people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis were given Ultravate lotion or a placebo (treatment with no active drug) for up to 2 weeks. After 2 weeks, 44.5% of people who used Ultravate lotion were cleared or almost cleared of their plaque psoriasis. This was compared with 6.3% to 7.1% of people who used a placebo.

People who used the Ultravate lotion saw less scaling, redness, and plaque elevation than people who used a placebo. (Plaque elevation is skin thickening caused by the buildup of dead skins cells.) The study results showed:

  • Less scaling in 55.5% to 59.1% of people who used Ultravate compared with 10.8% to 9.8% of people who used a placebo
  • Less redness in 36.4% to 43.6% of people who used Ultravate compared with 7.2% to 10.7% of people who used a placebo
  • Less plaque elevation in 43.6% to 45.5% of people who used Ultravate compared with 8.0% to 8.1% of people who used a placebo

Ultravate for skin conditions that can be treated with a corticosteroid

Ultravate cream and ointment are FDA-approved to treat swelling and itching from skin conditions that can be treated with a drug called a corticosteroid. (Ultravate itself is a corticosteroid.) Some of these skin conditions include eczema, poison ivy, and urticaria (hives).

Ultravate cream and ointment are approved for adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

Eczema

Eczema is a condition that makes your skin itchy and red, although symptoms can vary from person to person. The most common symptoms include:

  • dry skin
  • itching
  • red patches
  • small bumps that may leak fluid
  • scaly or cracked skin

Eczema occurs when your skin can't protect itself and retain moisture. The condition is usually genetic. Risk factors for eczema include having asthma, allergies, or a family member who has had the condition.

In an older clinical study, Ultravate ointment or a placebo ointment (treatment with no active drug) was given to people with chronic eczema for 2 weeks. By the end of the 2 weeks, 83% of people who used Ultravate ointment were cleared or almost cleared of their eczema plaques, compared with 28% of people who used a placebo ointment.

Poison ivy

Poison ivy rash results from your skin coming in contact with a substance called urushiol. This is a sap that's found on the stems, leaves, and roots of the poison ivy plant. Urushiol is also found on plants called poison oak and poison sumac. Symptoms of poison ivy rash include skin that's itchy, red, or swollen, and blisters that may leak.

Hives

Hives, which are also called urticaria, are a type of rash that causes your skin to be itchy, red, and have spots of swelling. These spots (welts) can be large or small.

Hives result from a release of a chemical called histamine into your bloodstream. Your immune system (your body's defense against infection) responds to histamine by causing redness and itching.

Hives can be triggered by infections, changes in temperature, stress, sunlight, or certain foods.

Ultravate for other conditions

In addition to the uses listed above, you may wonder if Ultravate is used for certain other conditions. Off-label drug use is when a drug that's approved for one use is used for a different one that's not approved. And you may wonder if Ultravate is used for certain other conditions.

Ultravate for acne (not an appropriate use)

Ultravate shouldn't be used to treat acne, as the medication can make acne worse instead of better. If you have acne that's bothersome, ask your doctor what treatments are right for you.

Ultravate can cause mild or serious side effects. The following list contains some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Ultravate. This list does not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Ultravate, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you'd like to report to the FDA a side effect you've had with Ultravate, you can do so through MedWatch.

More common side effects

The more common side effects of Ultravate can include:

If your skin condition gets worse, or doesn't go away within 2 weeks, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Ultravate aren't common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you're having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained in more detail below in "Side effect details," include:

  • hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression (a condition in which your adrenal glands shrink and don't work properly)

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here's some detail on a few of the side effects this drug may cause.

Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression

Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression is a condition in which your adrenal glands shrink and don't work properly. HPA can occur when drugs called corticosteroids, such as Ultravate, are applied to large areas of skin or are used in high doses for long periods of time.

One sign of HPA axis suppression is a condition called Cushing's syndrome. Some signs of Cushing's syndrome include:

HPA axis suppression is rare and wasn't seen in the Ultravate clinical studies.

If you use Ultravate for longer than the recommended 2 weeks, your doctor may monitor you for HPA axis suppression. If you do develop HPA axis suppression, your doctor may have you stop taking Ultravate, reduce your dose, or switch you to a less strong medication. Children and teenagers are more likely to develop HPA axis suppression than adults.

Skin stinging, burning, or itching

Skin may sting, burn, or itch where Ultravate is applied. In clinical studies of Ultravate cream, up to 4.4% of people had these side effects. The cream wasn't tested against a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

If your skin condition gets worse, tell your doctor. They may recommend a treatment other than Ultravate.

Skin thinning or atrophy

Skin atrophy (thinning) may occur where Ultravate is applied. In clinical studies of Ultravate lotion, 1% of people who used the medication had this side effect, compared with less than 1% of people who used a placebo lotion. Skin atrophy can appear as peeling, red, or translucent skin.

If your skin condition gets worse, tell your doctor. They may recommend a treatment other than Ultravate.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be better suited for you than others. If you're interested in finding an alternative to Ultravate, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when a drug that's approved for one use is used for a different one that's not approved.

Alternatives for plaque psoriasis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat plaque psoriasis include:

  • clobetasol propionate 0.05% (Clobex, Olux, Clodan, Cormax, Temovate, Emeline)
  • betamethasone dipropionate 0.25% (Diprolene, Diprosone)

Alternatives for itching and swelling from skin conditions that can be treated with a corticosteroid

Examples of other drugs that may be used for itching and swelling from skin conditions that can be treated with a corticosteroid include:

  • clobetasol propionate 0.05% (Clobex, Olux, Clodan, Cormax, Emeline)
  • betamethasone dipropionate 0.25% (Diprosone)

You may wonder how Ultravate compares to other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Ultravate and clobetasol are alike and different.

Ingredients

Ultravate contains the active drug halobetasol. Clobetasol contains the active drug clobetasol.

Uses

Both Ultravate and clobetasol are strong corticosteroids used to treat plaque psoriasis. Corticosteroids are a type of drug that reduces inflammation and eases swelling, redness, itching, and other allergy symptoms.

The two drugs are also approved to treat skin itching and swelling due to skin conditions such as eczema, poison ivy, and urticaria (hives).

Drug forms and administration

Here's some information about the forms of each drug and how you take them.

Ultravate forms

Ultravate comes in three different forms: lotion, cream, and ointment. Ultravate lotion is used to treat plaque psoriasis in adults. Ultravate cream and ointment are used for skin itching and swelling in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

You'll apply Ultravate to the affected parts of your skin once or twice a day for up to 2 weeks, or as your doctor or pharmacist recommends. Because of risk of side effects, treatment with Ultravate for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of Ultravate a week (50 mL a week of the lotion form). For more about Ultravate side effects, see the "Side effects and risks" section below.

Clobetasol forms

Clobetasol comes in several different forms: topical gel, lotion, cream, spray, ointment, and foam. You'll apply clobetasol to the affected parts of your skin twice a day for up to 2 weeks, or as your doctor or pharmacist recommends.

Because of risk of side effects, treatment with clobetasol for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of clobetasol a week (50 mL a week of the lotion form). For more about side effects of clobetasol, see the "Side effects and risks" section below.

Side effects and risks

Ultravate and clobetasol both contain different topical corticosteroids. ("Topical" means that you apply them to your skin.) Therefore, both medications can cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

This list contains examples of more common side effects that can occur with Ultravate, with clobetasol, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with Ultravate, with clobetasol, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Ultravate:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with clobetasol:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with both Ultravate and clobetasol
    • hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression (a condition in which your adrenal glands shrink and don't work properly)

Effectiveness

Ultravate and clobetasol have different FDA-approved uses, but they're both used to treat plaque psoriasis and skin itching and swelling associated with several dermatoses (skin conditions). These skin conditions include eczema, poison ivy, and hives.

These drugs haven't been directly compared in clinical studies, but studies have found that Ultravate lotion and clobetasol lotion are effective for treating plaque psoriasis.

Studies have also found Ultravate cream and ointment and clobetasol cream and ointment to be effective for treating skin itching and swelling associated with several skin conditions. These include eczema, poison ivy, and hives.

Costs

Ultravate is a brand-name drug, but it's also available as a generic called halobetasol propionate 0.05%. Clobetasol is a generic drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on WellRx.com, brand-name and generic Ultravate lotion, cream, and ointment cost significantly more than clobetasol lotion, cream, and ointment. The actual price you'll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Like clobetasol (above), the drug betamethasone has uses similar to those of Ultravate. Here's a comparison of how Ultravate and betamethasone are alike and different.

Ingredients

Ultravate contains the active drug halobetasol. Betamethasone contains the active drug betamethasone.

Uses

Both Ultravate and betamethasone are strong corticosteroids used to treat plaque psoriasis. Corticosteroids are a type of drug that reduces inflammation and eases swelling, redness, itching, and other allergy symptoms.

The two drugs are also approved to treat skin itching and swelling from several dermatoses (skin conditions) such as eczema, poison ivy, and urticaria (hives).

Drug forms and administration

Here's some information about the forms of each drug and how you take them.

Ultravate forms

Ultravate comes in three different forms: lotion, cream, and ointment. Ultravate lotion is used to treat plaque psoriasis in adults. Ultravate cream and ointment are used for skin itching and swelling in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

You'll apply Ultravate to the affected parts of your skin once or twice a day for up to 2 weeks, or as your doctor or pharmacist recommends. Because of risk of side effects, treatment with Ultravate for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of Ultravate a week (50 mL a week of the lotion form). For more about Ultravate side effects, see the "Side effects and risks" section below.

Betamethasone forms

Betamethasone comes in several different forms: lotion, cream, ointment, gel, spray, and foam. You'll apply betamethasone to the affected parts of your skin once or twice a day for up to 2 weeks, or as your doctor or pharmacist recommends.

Because of risk of side effects, treatment with betamethasone for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of betamethasone a week (50 mL a week of the lotion form). (For more about betamethasone side effects, see the "Side effects and risks" section below.)

Side effects and risks

Ultravate and betamethasone both contain strong corticosteroids. Therefore, both medications can cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

This list contains examples of more common side effects that can occur with Ultravate, with betamethasone, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with Ultravate, with betamethasone, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Ultravate:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with betamethasone:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with both Ultravate and betamethasone
    • hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression (a condition in which your adrenal glands shrink and don't work properly)

Effectiveness

Ultravate and betamethasone have different FDA-approved uses. But they're both used to treat plaque psoriasis as well as skin itching and swelling from several dermatoses (skin conditions). These skin conditions include eczema, poison ivy, and hives.

These drugs haven't been directly compared in clinical studies, but studies have found that Ultravate lotion and betamethasone ointment are effective for treating plaque psoriasis.

Studies have also found Ultravate cream and ointment and betamethasone cream, lotion, and ointment to be effective for treating skin itching and swelling associated with several skin conditions. These include eczema, poison ivy, and hives.

Costs

Ultravate is a brand-name drug, but it's also available as a generic called halobetasol propionate 0.05%. Betamethasone is a generic drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on WellRx.com, brand-name and generic Ultravate lotion, cream, and ointment cost significantly more than betamethasone lotion, cream, and ointment. The actual price you'll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

The Ultravate dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you're using Ultravate to treat
  • your age
  • the form of Ultravate you use
  • other medical conditions you may have

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to suit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Ultravate comes in several different forms that are used to treat different conditions:

  • Ultravate lotion is used to treat plaque psoriasis in adults. The medication comes in a bottle containing 60 mL (59 g) of 0.05% halobetasol propionate lotion.
  • Ultravate cream and ointment are used to treat skin swelling or itching in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older. These forms of the drug come in tubes containing 50 g of 0.05% halobetasol propionate cream or ointment.

Dosage for plaque psoriasis

For plaque psoriasis, you'll apply Ultravate lotion as a thin layer to the affected areas of your skin and rub it in gently. You'll typically do this twice a day until you see an improvement or for a maximum of 2 weeks.

Because of risk of side effects, treatment with Ultravate lotion for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g (50 mL) of Ultravate lotion a week. (For more about Ultravate side effects, see the "Ultravate side effects" section above.)

If you don't see an improvement in your skin after 2 weeks, talk with your doctor. They may switch you to a different medication.

You should use Ultravate lotion only on your skin and never near your eyes or mouth. You shouldn't use the medication on your face, groin, or underarms unless your doctor tells you to use it in these areas. Be sure to wash your hands after using Ultravate.

Dosage for skin conditions that can be treated with a corticosteroid

Ultravate cream and ointment are used to treat skin swelling and itching from conditions such as eczema, poison ivy, and urticaria (hives). You'll apply the medication as a thin layer to the affected areas of your skin and rub it in gently. You'll typically do this once or twice a day until you see an improvement or for a maximum of 2 weeks.

Because of risk of side effects, treatment with Ultravate cream or ointment for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of Ultravate cream or ointment a week. (For more about Ultravate side effects, see the "Ultravate side effects" section above.)

If you don't see an improvement in your skin after 2 weeks, talk with your doctor. They may switch you to a different medication.

You should use Ultravate cream or ointment only on your skin and never near your eyes or mouth. You shouldn't use the medication on your face, groin, or underarms unless your doctor tells you to use it in these areas. Be sure to wash your hands after using Ultravate.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Ultravate, try to use the drug as soon as you remember. Ultravate may not work as well or may stop working if you miss a dose. For the medication to work properly, you need to apply a certain amount to the affected areas of your skin until they're completely healed.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Treatment with Ultravate for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended because of the risk of side effects. If you don't see an improvement after 2 weeks, talk with your doctor. They may switch you to a different medication.

There are no known interactions between alcohol and Ultravate.

If you drink alcohol and are concerned about how it might interact with Ultravate, talk with your doctor. They can tell you how much is safe for you to drink during your treatment.

There are no known drug interactions between Ultravate and other medications.

Ultravate and herbs and supplements

There aren't any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Ultravate. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Ultravate.

Ultravate and foods

There are no known interactions between Ultravate and any foods.

As with all medications, the cost of Ultravate can vary. To find current prices for Ultravate in your area, check out WellRx.com. The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you'll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization before they approve coverage for Ultravate. This means that your doctor will need to send a request to your insurance company asking them to cover the drug. The insurance company will review the request and let you and your doctor know if your plan will cover Ultravate.

If you're not sure if you'll need to get prior authorization for Ultravate, contact your insurance company.

Financial assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Ultravate, help is available. Sun Pharmaceutical Industries, Inc., the manufacturer of Ultravate, offers the TaroPharma Copay Program. For more information and to find out if you're eligible for support, visit the program website.

You should use Ultravate according to your doctor's or healthcare provider's instructions.

You'll apply Ultravate as a thin layer to the affected areas of your skin and rub it in gently. You'll typically do this once or twice a day until you see an improvement or for a maximum of 2 weeks.

Because of risk of side effects, treatment with Ultravate for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of Ultravate a week. (For more about Ultravate side effects, see the "Ultravate side effects" section above.)

If you don't see an improvement in your skin after 2 weeks, talk with your doctor. They may switch you to a different medication.

You should use Ultravate only on your skin and never near your eyes or mouth. You shouldn't use the medication on your face, groin, or underarms unless your doctor tells you to use it in these areas. Be sure to wash your hands after using Ultravate.

When to take

You'll typically apply Ultravate to your skin once or twice a day until you see an improvement or for a maximum of 2 weeks.

Ultravate is available in three forms: lotion, cream, and ointment.

Ultravate lotion for plaque psoriasis

Ultravate lotion is used to treat plaque psoriasis, which is the most common form of psoriasis. Plaque psoriasis occurs when your immune system is overactive, and your body makes skin cells too rapidly. (Your immune system is your body's defense against infection.) This causes excess skin cells to build up on your skin's surface. The buildup typically appears as raised, red patches that may be covered with silver or white scales. These patches are known as "plaques."

Ultravate cream and ointment for various skin conditions

Ultravate cream and ointment are used for skin inflammation (swelling) and itching from skin conditions that can be treated with a drug called a corticosteroid. Ultravate itself is a corticosteroid. Some of the skin conditions that the cream and ointment may be used for include eczema, poison ivy, and urticaria (hives).

Eczema is a condition that makes your skin itchy and red, although symptoms can vary from person to person. Eczema occurs when your skin can't protect itself and retain moisture.

Poison ivy rash results from your skin coming in contact with a substance called urushiol. This is a sap that's found on the stems, leaves, and roots of the poison ivy plant. Symptoms of poison ivy rash include skin that's itchy, red, or swollen, and blisters that may leak.

Hives, which are also called urticaria, are a type of rash that causes your skin to be itchy, red, and have spots of swelling. These spots (welts) can be large or small.

Hives result from a release of a chemical called histamine into your bloodstream. Your immune system (your body's defense against infection) responds to histamine by causing redness and itching.

Hives can be triggered by infections, changes in temperature, stress, sunlight, or certain foods.

What Ultravate does

Because it's not clear what causes plaque psoriasis, how Ultravate works to treat the condition isn't completely understood. Ultravate does block the overreactive immune response from your cells that causes redness and inflammation (swelling). This helps control the skin conditions mentioned above, as well as inflammation and itching due to general skin irritation, such as plaque psoriasis.

How long does it take to work?

Most people begin to see their symptoms improve within a few days of using Ultravate. The maximum effect is typically seen after about 4 days.

Your skin starts to absorb Ultravate once you apply it to the affected areas. But each person will respond to the medication differently, and symptoms may ease faster in some people than in others.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist how long you should use Ultravate. Typically, treatment with Ultravate for longer than 2 weeks isn't recommended because of the risk of side effects. And you shouldn't use more than 50 g of Ultravate a week (50 mL a week of the lotion form).

Ultravate should be used in pregnancy only if the benefit to the mother outweighs any possible harm to the baby.

Research in animals has shown birth defects in babies when the pregnant mothers were given Ultravate. However, animal studies don't always predict what will happen in humans. And there haven't been enough studies done in pregnant women to be certain how Ultravate might affect the baby.

If you're pregnant or planning on becoming pregnant, talk with your doctor. They can help you review the pros and cons of using Ultravate and suggest a different medication, if needed.

It's not known if Ultravate is safe to take during pregnancy. If you're sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you're using Ultravate.

It's not known if Ultravate is safe to use while you're breastfeeding. The drug may pass into breast milk and cause side effects such as slower growth. Ultravate may also affect how well breastfed children make corticosteroids, which are a type of hormone that helps control inflammation (swelling).

If you're using Ultravate and want to breastfeed your child, talk with your doctor. They can help you decide on the best way to feed your child and suggest a treatment other than Ultravate, if needed.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Ultravate.

Can I use Ultravate on my face?

You shouldn't use Ultravate on your face unless your doctor tells you to use it there. And be sure to never put the medication near your eyes or mouth. This is because of the risk of side effects such as skin thinning, acne, and irritation on the face.

There have also been reports of rare eye-related side effects when corticosteroid creams such as Ultravate were used for a long time on the face or around the eyes. These side effects included an increase in eye pressure, vision loss, and cataracts.

Is Ultravate a steroid?

Yes. Ultravate contains the ingredient halobetasol propionate, which is a type of drug called a topical corticosteroid. ("Topical" means that you apply it to your skin.) Corticosteroids are often called steroids.

The skin conditions that Ultravate is used to treat are due to inflammation (swelling) and an overactive immune system. (Your immune system is your body's defense against infection.) Corticosteroids help ease inflammation and reduce how active your immune system is. The drugs do this by interacting with proteins in your body that produce a histamine response. (Histamine is a chemical in your body that drives allergic responses such as redness and swelling.) This helps reduce skin itching and irritation.

Will it cure my plaque psoriasis?

No, there isn't currently a cure for plaque psoriasis. The goal of Ultravate is to help clear up plaques, which are the raised, red patches on skin that may be covered with silver or white scales.

If you have questions about Ultravate or other treatments for plaque psoriasis, ask your doctor.

Can I place bandages over Ultravate on my skin?

You shouldn't put bandages or dressings over Ultravate unless your doctor or pharmacist specifically directs you to. Placing a bandage or dressing over the medication can cause your skin and body to absorb too much Ultravate. This can increase your risk for side effects and skin irritation. For more about possible side effects, see the "Ultravate side effects" section above.

If you're concerned about not bandaging your skin during Ultravate treatment, talk with your doctor.

Before taking Ultravate, talk with your doctor about your health history. Ultravate may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reactions. If you have an allergy to Ultravate or its ingredients, you shouldn't take the medication. Talk with your doctor about other possible treatments.
  • Skin infections. If you have a skin infection, your doctor will likely treat it while you use Ultravate. But if the infection doesn't clear up, they may want you to stop using Ultravate until the skin infection goes away.
  • Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression or Cushing's syndrome. Applying corticosteroids, such as Ultravate, to large areas of your body or using high doses for long periods of time may cause certain hormone conditions. These include hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression and Cushing's syndrome. (For symptoms, see the "Ultravate side effects" section above.) If you have a history of either of these conditions, tell your doctor before you start taking Ultravate. Your doctor may recommend a different treatment or recommend that you use Ultravate for a shorter time.
  • Type 1 or type 2 diabetes. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it's important that you use topical steroids, such as Ultravate, carefully. ("Topical" means that you apply it to your skin.) Steroids have been known to increase blood sugar if used for long periods, as well as delay the healing of skin ulcers (open wounds). Before you start using Ultravate, tell your doctor if you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Your doctor may recommend a different treatment or recommend that you use Ultravate for a shorter time.
  • Pregnancy. Ultravate should be used in pregnancy only if the benefit to the mother outweighs any possible harm to the baby. For more information, please see the "Ultravate and pregnancy" section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It's not known if Ultravate is safe to use while you're breastfeeding. For more information, please see the "Ultravate and breastfeeding" section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Ultravate, see the "Ultravate side effects" section above.

An Ultravate overdose is rare, but it can occur if you:

  • apply too much Ultravate to a large area of skin for longer than 2 weeks
  • put a bandage or dressing over Ultravate on your skin
  • use Ultravate for longer than 2 weeks or for longer than your doctor tells you to

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis suppression. This is a condition in which your adrenal glands shrink and don't work properly. One sign of HPA axis suppression is a condition called Cushing's syndrome. Some symptoms of Cushing's syndrome include:

HPA axis suppression is rare and wasn't seen in the Ultravate clinical studies.

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you've taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Ultravate from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle or tube. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee the effectiveness of the medication during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store Ultravate lotion at room temperature (around 77°F/25°C) and keep it in the bottle the pharmacist dispensed it in.

You should store Ultravate cream and ointment at room temperature between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C). Keep them in the tube the pharmacist dispensed them in.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Ultravate and have leftover medication, it's important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

You can find useful tips on medication disposal here. You can also ask your pharmacist for tips on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Ultravate is indicated to treat plaque psoriasis and inflammation and itching associated with skin dermatoses that actively respond to corticosteroids.

Mechanism of action

Ultravate contains the super-potent topical corticosteroid halobetasol propionate, whose exact mechanism of action is unknown. Corticosteroids are believed to act as antipruritic and vasoconstrictive agents through induction of inhibition of the release of arachidonic acid, a precursor for prostaglandins and leukotrienes, both inflammation mediators.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Absorption of Ultravate is variable and dependent upon the vehicle or formulation, skin integrity, and presence or absence of occlusive dressings. Human studies suggest approximately 6% of the applied dose enters the circulation at a mean of 96 hours after initial application. One study of 12 adult subjects receiving halobetasol propionate topically for 8 days showed maximum plasma concentrations 3 hours after application.

Ultravate is metabolized in the liver, and excretion occurs through the urine and bile.

Contraindications

Ultravate is contraindicated in patients who have a history of hypersensitivity to Ultravate or any of its components.

Storage

Ultravate lotion should be kept at room temperature around 77°F (25°C). However, excursions are allowed between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C). Don't freeze the lotion.

Ultravate cream and ointment should be kept at room temperature between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C).

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.