Dexilant contains the drug dexlansoprazole. A generic version of dexlansoprazole was approved by the Food and Drug Administration in 2017. However, this generic is not yet available in pharmacies.

A generic drug is an exact copy of a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Dexilant can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Dexilant. These lists don't include all possible side effects.

Some side effects of Dexilant are seen in both adults and children. Others generally affect only children taking the drug.

For more information on the possible side effects of Dexilant, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

More common side effects in adults

The more common side effects seen in adults using Dexilant can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they're more severe or don't go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

More common side effects in children

The more common side effects of Dexilant use in children ages 12 to 17 years old can include:

  • headache
  • abdominal (belly) pain
  • diarrhea
  • the common cold
  • mouth and throat pain

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they're more severe or don't go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects in adults and children

Serious side effects from Dexilant aren't common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you're having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained in more detail below in "Side effect details," can include the following:

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with Dexilant. Here's more detail on several of the side effects this drug may cause.

Long-term side effects

Using Dexilant long term may raise your risk for having serious side effects.

Long-term side effects seen in people taking Dexilant were:

  • bone fractures, in people who took Dexilant for more than 1 year
  • vitamin B-12 deficiency, in people who took Dexilant for more than 3 years
  • fundic gland polyps (abnormal tissue growths in the stomach), in people who took Dexilant for more than 1 year
  • hypomagnesemia (low magnesium levels), in people who took Dexilant for more than 3 months

To prevent these side effects, your doctor will prescribe the lowest dose of Dexilant that treats your symptoms, for the shortest time possible.

Tell your doctor if you have symptoms of any of these long-term problems. They can do tests to see if you have any of these conditions. If needed, they can prescribe medication to help relieve your symptoms. They may also ask you to switch from Dexilant to a different medication.

Weight gain

Dexilant may cause weight gain. In clinical studies, less than 2% of people taking Dexilant had weight gain.

Talk with your doctor if you're concerned about gaining weight while taking Dexilant. They can give you some tips to help balance your diet.

Blood pressure

Dexilant may cause high blood pressure. In clinical studies, less than 2% of people taking Dexilant had high blood pressure.

Most people with high blood pressure won't have symptoms. However, severe high blood pressure can cause symptoms, which can include:

  • headache
  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • shortness of breath
  • nosebleeds
  • blurred or double vision
  • dizziness

Talk with your doctor if you have symptoms of high blood pressure. They may want to monitor your blood pressure. If it's high, they can prescribe medications to help lower it.

Diarrhea

Dexilant may cause diarrhea. In clinical studies, 4.8% of people who took Dexilant had diarrhea. In comparison, 2.9% of people who took a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) had diarrhea.

If you have diarrhea from taking Dexilant, it will likely go away within a few days. Talk with your doctor if you have diarrhea that doesn't get better or if you also have a fever. It may be a symptom of a bacterial infection, such as a Clostridioides difficile (C. diff) infection.

C. diff is type of bacteria that naturally occurs in the gut. At normal levels, C. diff is not considered an infection. However, the bacteria can multiply and become an infection.

Your doctor may do tests to check if you have a bacterial infection. If needed, they can prescribe antibiotics to treat your infection.

Stomach pain

Dexilant may cause stomach pain. In clinical studies, about 4% of people who took Dexilant had stomach pain. In comparison, 3.5% of people who took a placebo had stomach pain.

If you have stomach pain, it may go away on its own. Talk with your doctor if you're concerned about your stomach pain or if it doesn't get better. They can suggest ways to help relieve your symptoms. They may also ask you to switch from Dexilant to a different medication.

Headache

Dexilant may cause headaches. In clinical studies, less than 2% of adults who took Dexilant had a headache. More than 5% of children ages 12 to 17 years had a headache.

Having a headache isn't usually considered serious, and it will likely go away on its own. Talk with your doctor if you have a headache that lasts several days. They can suggest ways to help relieve your symptoms.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Dexilant. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. In clinical studies, less than 2% of people taking Dexilant had severe allergic reactions.

Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • rash
  • swelling of your face
  • throat tightness
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Dexilant. They can prescribe medications to help relieve your symptoms. They may also switch you from Dexilant to a different medication.

Call 911 if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you're having a medical emergency.

Bone fracture

People taking Dexilant for long periods of time can have bone fractures. In particular, they may have fractures in their hips, wrist, or spine.

Fractures aren't as likely if you take Dexilant for a short period of time. In a 1-year clinical study, fractures happened in less than 2% of people taking Dexilant. But if you take Dexilant for longer than 1 year, or if you take more than one dose per day, you are more likely to have a bone fracture.

People using Dexilant long term may also be more likely to develop osteoporosis (bone loss). Osteoporosis is sometimes called a "silent disease" because many people don't notice any symptoms until a bone breaks.

Symptoms of osteoporosis can include:

  • bone fracture from a fall or bumping into furniture
  • severe back pain
  • loss of height
  • posture that's hunched or stooped over

The Dexilant dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the condition you're using Dexilant to treat
  • your age
  • your liver functionality

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to suit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Dexilant comes as capsules containing the drug dexlansoprazole. It's available in two different strengths: 30 milligrams (mg) and 60 mg.

Dosage for erosive esophagitis

If you have symptoms of erosive esophagitis, you should take a 60-mg capsule of Dexilant daily. Your doctor will prescribe Dexilant for up to 8 weeks.

If you've had erosive esophagitis in the past but it's been healed, you can take Dexilant to relieve heartburn and help prevent symptoms from coming back. In this case, your doctor will prescribe Dexilant for up to 6 months. The recommended dosage is a 30-mg capsule of Dexilant each day.

Dosage for GERD

If you have symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux (GERD), the suggested dosage of Dexilant is a 30-mg capsule daily. You should take this Dexilant dosage for 4 weeks.

Pediatric dosage

The recommended dosages of Dexilant for children ages 12 to 17 years old are the same as for adults.

However, the recommended treatment length for children can vary. Below is a list with the suggested treatment lengths for children ages 12 to 17 years old.

  • to help heal erosive esophagitis: up to 8 weeks
  • to help manage symptoms in erosive esophagitis that's already healed and relieve heartburn: up to 16 weeks
  • to treat symptoms of GERD: 4 weeks

What if I miss a dose?

If you notice that you missed a dose of Dexilant, you should take it immediately. However, if you realize this is close to the time you're supposed to take your next dose, don't take the missed one. Never take two doses of Dexilant at once. This can raise your risk of side effects and overdose.

To help make sure you don't miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

How long you should take Dexilant will depend on your age and your condition. In general, your doctor will likely try to avoid having you take Dexilant as a long-term treatment.

If your doctor determines that Dexilant is a good fit for you, you'll likely take it for 4 to 24 weeks.

Note: For more information on treatment lengths, see the "Dosage for erosive esophagitis," "Dosage for GERD," and "Pediatric dosage" sections above.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Dexilant to treat certain conditions. Dexilant may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that's approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Dexilant for erosive esophagitis

Dexilant is FDA-approved to heal erosive esophagitis in adults and in children ages 12 years and older. When taken for this purpose, Dexilant shouldn't be used for more than 8 weeks.

Dexilant is also FDA-approved as a maintenance treatment for erosive esophagitis that's been healed. It can help relieve heartburn and prevent symptoms of erosive esophagitis from returning. When taking Dexilant as a maintenance treatment, you can take it for up to 6 months.

Effectiveness

The use of Dexilant in adults and children with erosive esophagitis has been analyzed. Separate trials were conducted for people of different ages.

Dexilant in adults

Two clinical studies analyzed the use of Dexilant in adults with erosive esophagitis.

The two 8-week studies involved about 1,200 adults each. Roughly half of the people took Dexilant, and the rest took lansoprazole (Prevacid). Of the people taking Dexilant, 85% to 87% of people had their erosive esophagitis healed. Of those taking lansoprazole, 79% to 85% of people had their erosive esophagitis healed.

A third clinical study analyzed Dexilant as a maintenance medication to prevent erosive esophagitis symptoms from returning. The study included adults who had previously had erosive esophagitis that had since healed. About half of the people in the study received Dexilant for 6 months, and the other half received a placebo (a treatment without an active drug).

At the end of the study, 66.4% of people who received Dexilant had no return of their symptoms. In comparison, 14.3% of people who received a placebo had no return of their symptoms.

Dexilant in children

In a clinical study, Dexilant was found to be effective in treating erosive esophagitis in children. This study involved 58 children ages 12 to 17 years old who had erosive esophagitis. All the children took Dexilant for 8 weeks. After 8 weeks, 88% of the children had their erosive esophagitis healed.

In the second part of the study, 22 children who had their erosive esophagitis healed kept taking Dexilant for 16 more weeks. Another 24 children who had their erosive esophagitis healed switched from Dexilant to a placebo for 16 weeks.

At the end of the study, 82% of the children who kept taking Dexilant had no return of their symptoms. In comparison, 58% of the children who had switched to a placebo had no return of their symptoms.

Dexilant for GERD

Dexilant is FDA-approved to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) in adults and in children ages 12 years and older.

People using Dexilant to treat symptoms of GERD can take it for up to 4 weeks.

Effectiveness

The effectiveness of Dexilant was analyzed in adults and in children with nonerosive GERD. Different studies were conducted for each population.

Dexilant in adults

A clinical study evaluated Dexilant use in adults with symptoms of GERD. The trial included people who'd had heartburn for at least 6 months. In this group, half of the people took Dexilant and half took a placebo (a treatment with no active drug).

During the study, people who took Dexilant were heartburn-free on 54.9% of the days. In other words, people who took Dexilant had no symptoms of GERD more than half the time. In comparison, people who took a placebo were heartburn-free on 18.5% of the days.

Dexilant in children

Clinical studies have also found Dexilant to be effective in children with symptoms of GERD. Dexilant was given to children ages 12 to 17 years old who'd had heartburn for at least 3 months. In this study, children who took Dexilant were heartburn-free on 47% of the days.

Off-label uses for Dexilant

In addition to the uses listed above, Dexilant may be taken off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use is when a drug that's approved for one use is taken for a different one that's not approved.

Dexilant for gastritis

Dexilant isn't FDA-approved to treat gastritis (swelling in the stomach lining). However, it may be useful in certain cases of gastritis.

A common cause of gastritis is a bacterial infection called Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). To treat H. pylori infections, the American College of Gastroenterology recommends a combination of antibiotics plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Dexilant is a PPI.

Talk with your doctor if you have gastritis and want to use Dexilant. They can help determine if Dexilant is a good option for you.

Dexilant for ulcers

The FDA hasn't approved Dexilant to treat people with ulcers. However, it may be useful for treating stomach ulcers (sometimes called peptic ulcer disease).

A common cause of peptic ulcer disease is a bacterial infection called H. pylori. To treat H. pylori infections, the American College of Gastroenterology recommends a combination of antibiotics plus a proton pump inhibitor (PPI). Dexilant is a PPI.

Talk with your doctor if you want to use Dexilant to treat your ulcers. They can help determine if Dexilant is a good option for you.

Dexilant and children

Dexilant is FDA-approved to treat erosive esophagitis, heartburn, and nonerosive GERD in children ages 12 years and older. Dosages for children are usually the same as for adults. However, the length of time that children take Dexilant may vary.

To learn about Dexilant's effectiveness in treating children's conditions, see the "Dexilant for erosive esophagitis" and "Dexilant for GERD" sections above.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others.

If you're interested in finding an alternative to Dexilant, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that's approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for erosive esophagitis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat erosive esophagitis include:

  • esomeprazole (Nexium)
  • lansoprazole (Prevacid)
  • omeprazole (Prilosec)
  • pantoprazole (Protonix)
  • famotidine (Pepcid)
  • ranitidine (Zantac)

Alternatives for GERD

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) include:

  • pantoprazole (Protonix)*
  • lansoprazole (Prevacid)
  • esomeprazole (Nexium)
  • omeprazole (Prilosec)
  • rabeprazole (AcipHex)
  • ranitidine (Zantac)
  • famotidine (Pepcid)
  • cimetidine (Tagamet)*
  • nizatidine (Axid)*
* Used off-label to treat this condition

You may wonder how Dexilant compares to other medications that have similar uses. Here we look at how Dexilant and Nexium are alike and different.

Uses

Dexilant is a prescription medication. It's used in people with erosive esophagitis or symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

Nexium is available as a prescription medication and an over-the-counter medication. It's used in people with GERD, frequent heartburn, erosive esophagitis, Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) infections and hypersecretory conditions such as Zollinger-Ellison syndrome. It's also used to help prevent stomach ulcers in people taking nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs).

Both Dexilant and Nexium can be used in adults, but their use in children varies. Dexilant is approved for use in children ages 12 to 17 years old. Nexium is approved for use in children ages 1 to 17 years old.

Dexilant contains the drug dexlansoprazole. Nexium contains the drug esomeprazole. Both belong to the same class of drugs, called proton pump inhibitors. This means they work the same way in your body.

Drug forms and administration

Dexilant comes as a capsule.

Nexium can come as a capsule, an oral suspension (powder that's dissolved in water), or an injection given to you by a healthcare provider.

Side effects and risks

Enbrel and Nexium have some similar side effects and others that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Dexilant, with Nexium, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Dexilant:
  • Can occur with Nexium:
    • constipation**
    • dry mouth**
    • sleepiness*
  • Can occur with both Dexilant and Nexium:
    • headache
    • nausea
    • diarrhea
    • abdominal (belly) pain
    • flatulence (passing gas)**
* More common in children** More common in adults

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with Enbrel and Nexium (when taken individually).

Can occur with both Dexilant and Nexium:

Effectiveness

One clinical study compared the use of Dexilant and Nexium in 175 adults with GERD. Of that group, 88 people received Dexilant and 87 people received Nexium. After 7 days, Dexilant and Nexium had similar effectiveness in treating GERD.

In the group of people who took Dexilant, 55.3% of people were symptom-free at the end of the week. In comparison, 36.8% of people in the group who took Nexium were symptom-free at the end of the week.

The use of Dexilant and Nexium has also been compared through literature reviews. These reviews analyzed the use of Dexilant and Nexium in people with erosive esophagitis and nonerosive reflux disease, a type of GERD. In people with erosive esophagitis, Dexilant and Nexium were found to have similar effectiveness.

However, Dexilant was found to be more effective than Nexium in treating nonerosive reflux disease. People who took Dexilant were twice as likely to experience relief of their heartburn symptoms compared to people who took Nexium.

Costs

Dexilant and Nexium are brand-name drugs. There is currently no generic form of Dexilant available. Nexium is available in generic form, which is called esomeprazole. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Dexilant is significantly more expensive than Nexium. The actual price you'll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Omeprazole has uses similar to those of Dexilant. Here's a comparison of how Dexilant and omeprazole are alike and different.

Uses

Dexilant is a brand-name prescription medication that contains the drug dexlansoprazole. It's used in people with erosive esophagitis and symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Dexilant is approved for use in adults and in children ages 12 years and older.

Omeprazole is a generic drug that also comes as the brand-name drug Prilosec (available as a prescription and over-the-counter drug). Omeprazole can be used to treat many conditions, including:

Dexilant and omeprazole belong to the same class of drugs, called proton pump inhibitors. This means they work the same way in your body.

Drug forms and administration

Dexilant comes as a capsule.

Omeprazole can come as a capsule, tablet, dissolving tablet, or as an oral suspension (powder that's dissolved in water).

Side effects and risks

Enbrel and omeprazole have some similar side effects and others that differ. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Dexilant, with omeprazole, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Dexilant:
    • mouth and throat pain*
  • Can occur with omeprazole:
    • cough
    • fever*
  • Can occur with both Dexilant and omeprazole:
* More common in children

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with Dexilant and with omeprazole (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

These drugs haven't been directly compared in clinical studies. But studies have found both Dexilant and omeprazole to be effective for treating erosive esophagitis and symptoms of GERD.

Costs

Dexilant is a brand-name drug. There are currently no generic forms of Dexilant available. Omeprazole is a generic drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Dexilant is generally significantly more expensive than omeprazole. The actual price you'll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your stomach produces acid to digest the food you eat. Some people's stomach produces too much acid, which can cause acid reflux. Acid reflux means that acid flows back up from your stomach to your esophagus (tube that connects your mouth to your stomach).

Having acid in your esophagus can lead to esophagitis, which is the inflammation (swelling) of the esophagus. Severe esophagitis can change the structure of your esophagus and can cause erosive esophagitis. People with erosive esophagitis develop ulcers (open sores) in their esophagus.

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) occurs if stomach acid collects in the lower part of your esophagus and the upper part of your stomach. Nonerosive GERD means that the acid doesn't cause sores in your esophagus.

Heartburn (a burning sensation in the throat or chest) is a common symptom of reflux diseases, including erosive esophagitis and nonerosive GERD.

What does Dexilant do?

Dexilant belongs to a class of drugs called proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). All PPIs work the same way in your body.

PPIs attach to specific proteins in your stomach cells called H+/K+-ATPases. These proteins increase the level of acid in your stomach. By attaching to them, PPIs stop these proteins from working.

PPIs reduce the amount of acid in your stomach. This can help prevent acid from flowing from your stomach back up to your esophagus. As a result, you should experience less acid reflux.

How long does it take to work?

Dexilant will start working within a few days. In a clinical study, 38% of people were heartburn-free after taking Dexilant for 3 days.

Don't stop taking Dexilant if your symptoms don't improve immediately. It could take 1 to 2 weeks for your symptoms to be relieved. Don't stop taking Dexilant unless your doctor tells you to.

Talk with your doctor if your symptoms haven't improved after 2 weeks of treatment. They can determine if you need to increase your dosage or switch to a different medication.

Dexilant can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain herbs.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Dexilant and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Dexilant. This list doesn't contain all drugs that may interact with Dexilant.

  • warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven)
  • methotrexate (Trexall, Otrexup, Rasuvo)
  • digoxin (Lanoxin)
  • tacrolimus (Astagraf XL, Envarsus XR, Prograf)
  • rifampin (Rifadin)
  • voriconazole (Vfend)
  • antiretrovirals, such as rilpivirine (Edurant) or atazanavir (Reyataz)
  • drugs dependent on gastric pH for absorption, such as iron or mycophenolate mofetil (CellCept)

Before taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Dexilant and warfarin

Warfarin is an anticoagulant medication (blood thinner) used in people with blood clots. Taking warfarin with Dexilant can raise the amount of warfarin in your body. Too much warfarin can raise your risk of excessive bleeding. If uncontrolled, excessive bleeding can lead to death.

Talk with your doctor if you're currently taking warfarin or if you start taking it while using Dexilant. They can help make sure your warfarin dosage is safe to take with Dexilant.

Dexilant and methotrexate

Methotrexate is a common medication used in people with cancer and autoimmune conditions, such as rheumatoid arthritis or psoriasis. Dexilant can increase the amount of methotrexate in your body if you take these drugs together. Too much methotrexate can be toxic and can cause serious side effects, including severe infections.

Talk with your doctor if you're currently taking methotrexate or if you start taking it while using Dexilant. They may adjust your Dexilant dosage to make sure it's safe to take with methotrexate. They may also have you stop taking Dexilant and switch to a different medication.

Dexilant and digoxin

Digoxin is a common medication used in people with heart problems. Dexilant can increase how much digoxin is in your body if you take these drugs together. Too much digoxin can cause serious side effects, including vision problems and confusion.

Talk with your doctor if you're currently taking digoxin or if you start taking it while using Dexilant. They may adjust your digoxin dosage to make sure it's safe to take with Dexilant.

Dexilant and tacrolimus

The use of tacrolimus is very common in people who have undergone organ transplants. Taking tacrolimus with Dexilant can increase the amount of tacrolimus in your body. High amounts of tacrolimus can cause serious side effects, including kidney problems.

Talk with your doctor if you've received an organ transplant and are taking tacrolimus. They may adjust your dosage of tacrolimus to make sure it's safe to take with Dexilant.

Dexilant and rifampin

Rifampin is an antibiotic used to treat bacterial infections. Dexilant may not be effective in people taking rifampin. This is because rifampin decreases the amount of Dexilant in your body if you take these drugs together.

Talk with your doctor if you're currently taking rifampin or if you start taking it while using Dexilant. They may ask you to stop taking rifampin and switch to a different antibiotic. If you can't take a different antibiotic, they may have you switch from Dexilant to a different medication.

Dexilant and voriconazole

Voriconazole is used in people with fungus infections. Taking voriconazole with Dexilant can increase the amounts of Dexilant in your body. High amounts of Dexilant can cause side effects such as diarrhea and nausea.

Tell your doctor if you're currently taking voriconazole or if you start taking it while using Dexilant. They can determine if you need to adjust your dosage of either drug to make sure they're safe to take together.

Dexilant and antiretrovirals

Taking antiretroviral drugs (which treat HIV) with Dexilant can affect the amount of antiretroviral drugs in your body. Dexilant lowers the amount of some antiretrovirals in the body and increases the amount of others.

Lower amounts of antiretrovirals in the body can make the drugs less effective. Higher amounts can raise your risk of side effects.

Dexilant lowers the amount of these antiretroviral drugs in your body:

  • rilpivirine
  • atazanavir
  • nelfinavir

Dexilant increases the amount of this antiretroviral in your body:

  • saquinavir

Dexilant can also interact with the antiretroviral drug ritonavir. Ritonavir can increase the amount of Dexilant in your body. High amounts of Dexilant can cause side effects such as diarrhea and nausea.

Talk with your doctor if you're currently taking an antiretroviral drug or if you start taking one while using Dexilant. They can determine if you need to adjust your dosage of either drug to make sure they're safe to take together.

Dexilant and drugs dependent on stomach acid for absorption

Some medications need a certain level of stomach acid to help them be absorbed in your blood. Dexilant reduces the amounts of acid in your stomach. This may change the amounts of the other medications in your blood. This change could make other drugs less effective or raise your risk of side effects.

Drugs that depend on stomach acid for absorption include:

  • iron
  • cancer drugs such as erlotinib, dasatinib, and nilotinib
  • mycophenolate mofetil, a drug used for organ transplants
  • antifungals such as ketoconazole and itraconazole

Talk with your doctor if you're currently taking a drug that depends on stomach acid for absorption or if you start taking one while using Dexilant. Your doctor may adjust your dosage of Dexilant to make sure it's safe to take with your other medications.

Dexilant and herbs

Dexilant can interact with the herb St. John's wort. St. John's wort can decrease the amount of Dexilant in your body. Lower amounts of Dexilant can make it less effective.

Tell your doctor about all the herbs you take, including St. John's wort. They can determine if those herbs are safe to take with Dexilant.

There are no known interactions between Dexilant and alcohol. However, alcohol can cause acid reflux. This can worsen your symptoms of erosive esophagitis or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD).

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much alcohol is safe to drink with your condition.

You should swallow each capsule of Dexilant with a glass of water.

When to take

You'll take Dexilant once a day. It doesn't matter what time of day you take it. However, try to take it around the same time each day.

To make sure you don't miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Taking Dexilant with food

You can take Dexilant with or without food.

Can Dexilant be crushed, split, or chewed?

You should swallow each capsule of Dexilant whole. You shouldn't chew it.

Talk with your doctor if you have problems swallowing the capsules. They can suggest other ways to take Dexilant. These ways may include opening the capsule and mixing its contents with applesauce, or mixing its contents with water in a dosing syringe. They can also include using a nasogastric tube (a tube inserted into your nose that carries food into your stomach).

No clinical studies have been done to evaluate Dexilant use in pregnant women. However, studies have looked at whether other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) are safe to use during pregnancy. (Dexilant is a PPI.) A review of 60 studies found that PPIs didn't cause birth defects or other problems during pregnancy.

However, a 2013 study found that drugs which lower stomach acid may cause problems later on. When pregnant women took an acid-lowering drug, their babies were more likely to develop childhood asthma. More research is needed to determine whether taking Dexilant during pregnancy causes childhood asthma.

In animal studies, Dexilant was found safe for use in pregnant animals even at high doses. But studies in animals don't always reflect what happens in humans.

Tell your doctor if you're currently pregnant or if you're planning a pregnancy while taking Dexilant. Also, let your doctor know if you become pregnant while taking Dexilant. They can help determine if Dexilant is safe for you to use during pregnancy.

It's not known if Dexilant is safe to take during pregnancy. If you are sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while using Dexilant.

The safety of Dexilant during breastfeeding hasn't been evaluated in human studies. It's not known if Dexilant passes into breast milk, affects a breastfeeding child, or alters milk production.

Lansoprazole is a drug very similar to Dexilant. In animal studies, traces of lansoprazole were found in animal milk. The effects in the animal offspring are unknown.

Talk with your doctor if you're currently breastfeeding or plan to start breastfeeding while taking Dexilant. They can help determine if breastfeeding while taking Dexilant is safe for you and your child.

As with all medications, the cost of Dexilant can vary. To find current prices for Dexilant in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you'll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before approving coverage for Dexilant. This means that your doctor will need to send a request to your insurance company asking them to cover the drug. The insurance company will review the request and let you and your doctor know if your plan will cover Dexilant.

If you're not sure if you'll need to get prior authorization for Dexilant, contact your insurance company.

Financial assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Dexilant, help is available. Takeda Pharmaceuticals America Inc., the manufacturer of Dexilant, offers the Dexilant Advantage Program. For more information and to find out if you're eligible for support, call 866-279-5598 or visit the program website.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Dexilant.

Will I have withdrawal symptoms if I stop taking Dexilant?

Probably not. The use of Dexilant alone isn't associated with withdrawal symptoms. But if you stop taking Dexilant before your condition has improved, your symptoms may come back.

Talk with your doctor if you want to stop taking Dexilant. They can help determine the safest way to stop taking it.

Can I get Dexilant or similar drugs over the counter?

No, Dexilant is not available over the counter, but other similar drugs are.

Dexilant is a prescription medication. This means you need to present a medical prescription to your pharmacist to get Dexilant. However, other drugs similar to Dexilant can be purchased over the counter (without a prescription). These drugs include lansoprazole (Prevacid), esomeprazole (Nexium), and omeprazole (Prilosec).

Can Dexilant cure my esophagitis or GERD?

Yes, Dexilant can cure your erosive esophagitis. It can also relieve your symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). However, this doesn't mean your symptoms won't come back. In some cases, you may have heartburn flare-ups or a return of other symptoms.

Talk with your doctor about steps you can take to help prevent your symptoms from returning.

Will Dexilant completely stop my stomach from making acid?

No. Dexilant will only reduce the amount of acid your stomach makes. This helps prevent symptoms like heartburn.

How long is it safe to take Dexilant?

You should take Dexilant for as long as your doctor prescribes it. Most people take Dexilant for 4 to 24 weeks. Taking Dexilant for longer than your doctor prescribes could cause serious long-term side effects.

Talk with your doctor if you're interested in taking Dexilant for longer than you were originally prescribed. They can determine if it's safe for you to keep taking Dexilant or if you should switch to a different medication.

Note: For more information on the long-term side effects of Dexilant, see the "Dexilant side effects" section above.

Before taking Dexilant, talk with your doctor about your health history. Dexilant may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Known hypersensitivity to Dexilant or other proton pump inhibitors (PPIs). If you've had an allergic reaction to Dexilant or other PPIs in the past, you shouldn't use Dexilant. Talk to your doctor about which medications are safe to treat your condition.
  • Certain types of lupus erythematosus. Cutaneous lupus erythematosus and systemic lupus erythematosus are types of lupus, which is an autoimmune disease. If you have one of these conditions, Dexilant could make it worse. Call your doctor right away if you have symptoms of these conditions that worsen while you take Dexilant. These symptoms can include joint pain or a rash on your cheeks or arms that gets worse when you're in the sun.
  • Pregnancy. It's not known if Dexilant is safe for use in pregnant women. For more information, see the "Dexilant and pregnancy" section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It isn't known if Dexilant is safe for use in women who are breastfeeding. To learn more, see the "Dexilant and breastfeeding" section above.

Note: For more information about the side effects of Dexilant, see the "Dexilant side effects" section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Dexilant can lead to serious side effects.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

If you think you've taken too much of Dexilant, call your doctor. They can monitor your condition and, if needed, prescribe medication to treat your symptoms.

You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Dexilant from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee the medication will be effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist. They'll tell you whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long Dexilant remains good can depend on how and where you store the medication.

Dexilant capsules should be stored at room temperature between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C). If needed, you can store Dexilant at temperatures between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C) for short periods of time.

You should store Dexilant in a tightly sealed container. Avoid storing Dexilant in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Dexilant and have leftover medication, it's important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

The FDA website provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Dexilant is an acid-modifier indicated to treat gastrointestinal disorders. Below is the list of Dexilant indications approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA):

  • Healing of erosive esophagitis of all grades. Dexilant is approved for people ages 12 years and older. Treatment length should be limited to no more than 8 weeks.
  • Maintenance treatment of healed erosive esophagitis. Dexilant is approved in adults and children ages 12 years and older. Treatment length shouldn't exceed 6 months and 16 weeks for adult and pediatric populations, respectively.
  • Symptoms of nonerosive gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD). Dexilant is approved for people ages 12 years and older. Treatment length shouldn't exceed 4 weeks.

Mechanism of action

Dexilant is a proton pump inhibitor medication. It's considered an antisecretory drug.

Dexilant inhibits the action of the H+/K+-ATPase enzyme. This enzyme is considered a proton pump and is present at the surface of gastric parietal cells. Through this inhibition, Dexilant blocks the secretion of gastric acid by the enzyme. The blockage interrupts the last step of the production of gastric acid.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of Dexilant are described below.

Adult profile

The pharmacokinetics of Dexilant presents two peaks after its administration. The first peak is observed within 1 to 2 hours following the administration. The second peak occurs within 4 to 5 hours of Dexilant administration.

Once absorbed, 96% to 99% of Dexilant binds to plasma proteins. After consecutive doses, Dexilant reaches a volume of distribution of 40 L.

Dexilant undergoes extensive metabolization by enzymes from the P450 cytochrome. Most of the reactions are catalyzed by the enzymes CYP2C19 and CYP3A4 and result in inactive metabolites.

Dexilant is not renally excreted. Because of this, Dexilant's pharmacokinetics profile doesn't vary in people with impaired renal function.

The elimination half-life is 1 to 2 hours. The continuous administration of daily Dexilant doesn't cause accumulation of its active ingredient.

Pediatric profile

The pharmacokinetics of Dexilant haven't been studied in children younger than 12 years old. Current studies only involve children ages 12 to 17 years old.

In children ages 12 to 17 years old, the overall exposure to Dexilant is slightly lower than in adult patients.

Contraindications

The use of Dexilant is contraindicated in patients with hypersensitivity to any of its ingredients. Dexilant is also contraindicated in patients receiving treatment with rilpivirine.

Storage

Dexilant should be stored at room temperatures of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). Brief excursions are permitted between 59°F and 86°F (15°C and 30°C).

Dexilant capsules should be kept in their original package.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.