Beovu is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Wet AMD is an eye disease that occurs when new blood vessels develop in a part of the eye called the macula. If the blood vessels leak, it can cause vision loss. Sometimes, doctors refer to “wet” as “neovascular.”

Beovu contains brolucizumab, which is a type of drug called a human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor. VEGF causes blood vessels to form, and too much VEGF can lead to wet AMD. Beovu blocks VEGF to help ease the symptoms of wet AMD and slow down vision loss.

Beovu comes as a solution (liquid mixture) in a single-dose vial. The drug is available in one strength: 6 mg/0.05 mL. A healthcare provider will give Beovu as an injection. You’ll most likely receive the drug once a month for the first three doses, then once every 8 to 12 weeks.

FDA approval

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Beovu in October 2019 to treat wet AMD.

Effectiveness

Clinical trials have shown Beovu to be effective in treating wet AMD.

Two clinical studies looked at vision changes over 1 year in people with wet AMD. They received either Beovu or a different drug called aflibercept (Eylea). The study involved measuring people’s vision changes using an eye chart to see how many letters they could read.

  • In one study, people who received Beovu were able to read 6.6 more letters after a year of treatment. People who received aflibercept were able to read 6.8 more letters in the same time frame.
  • The second clinical study showed similar results. People who received Beovu were able to read 6.9 more letters in a year compared with 7.6 more letters in a year for people who received aflibercept.

For more details about these studies, see the “Beovu uses” section below.

Beovu is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics also tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Beovu contains the active drug ingredient called brolucizumab.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended.

Drug forms and strengths

Beovu comes as a solution (liquid mixture) in a single-dose vial. The drug is available in one strength: 6 mg/0.05 mL.

Dosage for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD)

The recommended dose for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is one injection (6 mg/0.05 mL), which an eye doctor will give in the eye. You’ll receive an injection once a month (about every 25 to 31 days) for the first three doses. After this, you’ll likely receive one injection every 8 to 12 weeks.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss an appointment to receive your injection, call your eye doctor as soon as possible to reschedule your dose.

To help make sure that you don’t miss an appointment, try setting a reminder on your phone or writing your treatment schedule on a calendar.

Will I need to receive this drug long term?

Beovu is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. You’ll have regular vision tests and eye exams to check how well the drug is working for you. If you and your doctor determine that Beovu is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely receive the injections long term.

Beovu can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Beovu. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Beovu, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Beovu, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Beovu can include:*

  • blurry vision
  • cataracts (cloudy spots in the lens of your eye)
  • broken blood vessels in the eye
  • eye floaters (moving spots or strings in your field of vision)
  • eye pain
  • swelling in the eye
  • conjunctivitis (pink eye), the swelling or infection of the layer that covers the white part of your eye
  • changes to your vision for a time after the injection, such as seeing less clearly

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or do not go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Beovu. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or refer to Beovu’s package instructions.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Beovu are not common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained more below under “Side effect details,” can include:

Side effect details

Here are some details on some of the side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people may have an allergic reaction after taking Beovu. In clinical studies, allergic reactions occurred in 2% of people who received Beovu. In comparison, about 1% of people who received aflibercept (Eylea) had allergic reactions.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

Some people may have a more severe allergic reaction but this is rare. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling inside your eye or under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Beovu. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Inflammation of the eye

Beovu can cause endophthalmitis, a condition that occurs when the inside of the eye becomes infected. In clinical studies, 1% of people who received Beovu developed endophthalmitis. In comparison, less than 1% of people who received aflibercept developed the side effect. To help prevent endophthalmitis, your doctor will handle, prepare, and inject Beovu with extra caution.

Symptoms of endophthalmitis can include:

  • red eye
  • sensitivity to light
  • eye pain that gets worse after an injection
  • vision that’s blurry or less clear
  • loss of vision

Endophthalmitis is rare but serious. So if you notice any of the symptoms listed above, tell your doctor right away. And keep watching for symptoms for several days after receiving a Beovu injection.

If you develop endophthalmitis, your doctor will work to find the treatment that’s best for you. Your symptoms should start to ease within days of being treated.

Detached retina

Beovu can cause the retina to detach or pull away from where it should be in the eye. In clinical studies, a detached retina occurred in 1% of people who received Beovu. In comparison, less than 1% of people who received aflibercept had a detached retina.

The retina is a thin layer in the back of the eye that helps convert light rays into clear images. A detached retina can cause:

  • eye floaters (spots or strings that move across your field of vision)
  • flashes of light
  • blurry vision

If you notice any of the symptoms listed above, tell your doctor right away. Getting help soon may help prevent further problems.

Increased pressure in the eye

An increase in eye pressure can occur with Beovu. In clinical studies, 4% of people who received Beovu had a sudden increase in eye pressure. In comparison, about 5% of people who received aflibercept had high eye pressure.

In the first 30 minutes after your injection, you’ll be at risk for increased pressure inside your eye. So your doctor will monitor your eye pressure after giving you the injection. There’s also a risk of increased pressure in the eye after repeated doses of Beovu.

Everyone has pressure inside their eyes. But when the pressure is higher than normal over time, you may be at risk for glaucoma (an eye condition that can lead to blindness). Because of this, you’ll need regular eye exams to check your eye pressure. You may not notice any symptoms of increased eye pressure. So be sure to get your eyes checked routinely as your eye doctor recommends.

If you do develop the condition, your doctor may treat you with eye drops to help lower the pressure.

Blood clots, heart attack, and stroke

Blood clots, heart attack, and stroke can occur with Beovu and other drugs in the same class. (A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way. Beovu is in a drug class called vascular endothelial growth factor inhibitors.)

In rare cases, Beovu may increase the risk of blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. Combined results from two clinical studies showed that these side effects occurred in 4.5% of people who received Beovu compared with 4.7% of people who received aflibercept.

Symptoms of blood clots in the legs or arms can include:

  • swelling
  • pain or tenderness
  • warmth or redness

Symptoms of blood clots in the lungs can include:

  • trouble breathing
  • pain in the chest that gets worse when lying down or breathing in deeply
  • coughing with or without blood
  • heartbeat that’s faster or different than usual

Heart attack symptoms can include:

  • tightness or pain in the middle of your chest that lasts more than several minutes
  • trouble breathing
  • cold sweats
  • feeling lightheaded
  • nausea

Stroke symptoms can include:

  • one side of face droops or is numb
  • weakness in one arm
  • slurred speech or trouble speaking

If you notice any of the above symptoms, call 911 right away.

Immunogenicity

Immunogenicity can occur with Beovu. Immunogenicity is a condition in which your immune system tries to stop a protein-based drug from working. Your immune system is your body’s defense against infection. With Beovu, your immune system may try to fight the drug and respond by making proteins called antibodies. These antibodies can block Beovu from working the way it should.

In clinical studies, 36% to 52% of people had antibodies against Beovu before they received their first injection. After starting the treatment, 53% to 67% of people had antibodies against Beovu. About 6% of those people who had antibodies had inflammation (swelling) inside their eye. The study did not compare Beovu with a different drug or a placebo. A placebo is a treatment that contains no active medication.

If you are concerned about developing immunogenicity while taking Beovu, talk with your doctor. They will likely monitor you for the condition during your treatment. If you do develop immunogenicity, your doctor may prescribe a different medication.

Blindness

Blindness is a rare side effect of Beovu. In clinical studies, blindness occurred in 1% of people who received Beovu. This was compared with less than 1% of people who received aflibercept.

Blindness can be short term (last a few minutes) or long term (last many days or be permanent). It’s important to note that wet age-related macular degeneration can also cause blindness if left untreated.

If you experience blindness while using Beovu, tell your doctor right away. They will recommend the right treatment for you.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs, such as Beovu, to treat specific conditions.

Beovu for neovascular age-related macular degeneration (wet AMD)

The FDA has approved Beovu to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Sometimes, doctors refer to “wet” as “neovascular.”

Wet AMD is a leading cause of vision loss for people ages 50 years and older. This eye condition can affect one or both eyes.

Wet AMD develops when a protein called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) makes too many new blood vessels. These abnormal blood vessels form under the part of the eye called the macula. If the blood vessels leak fluid, it can damage the macula.

Damage to the macula can cause vision changes, such as seeing straight lines as wavy or having blurry eyesight in the center area of your vision. Over time, wet AMD leads to vision loss in the center part of the eye.

Beovu is a type of drug called a human VEGF inhibitor. It inhibits (blocks) VEGF to reduce the number of blood vessels and slow down fluid leakage. Anti-VEGF drugs, such as Beovu, are typically the first choice of treatment for AMD, according to the American Academy of Ophthalmology. Laser therapy may also be an option for some types of wet AMD.

Effectiveness

Two clinical studies looked at vision changes over 1 year in people with wet AMD. They received either Beovu or a different drug called aflibercept (Eylea). The study involved measuring people’s vision changes using an eye chart to see how many letters they could read.

The Beovu group received treatment every 8 or 12 weeks. The researchers switched people who received Beovu every 12 weeks to an 8-week regimen based on their symptoms, if needed. The aflibercept group received treatment every 8 weeks. Both clinical studies showed that the Beovu group had similar vision changes to those in the aflibercept group.

  • In one study, people who received Beovu were able to read 6.6 more letters after a year of treatment. People who received aflibercept were able to read 6.8 more letters in the same time frame. And of those who received Beovu every 12 weeks, 56% of people had wet AMD that remained stable. This means that their condition did not worsen, so they did not need to have injections more frequently (every 8 weeks).
  • The second clinical study showed similar results. People who received Beovu were able to read 6.9 more letters in a year compared with 7.6 more letters in a year for people who received aflibercept. 51% of the people who took Beovu every 12 weeks had wet AMD that remained stable for a year.

The two studies were extended for another year, and the results at the end of that time were similar to the 1-year results.

Beovu for other conditions

In addition to the use listed above, you may wonder whether Beovu is suitable for other conditions. The FDA has not approved the drug for other conditions, but researchers are studying other possible uses of Beovu. Below is some information about ongoing clinical studies of the medication.

Beovu for diabetic macular edema (under study)

Diabetic macular edema (DME) is the swelling of a part of the eye called the macula and is a complication of diabetes. Beovu isn’t approved to treat DME. However, one clinical trial is comparing Beovu with aflibercept in people with the condition. Researchers are looking at the safety and effectiveness of the drugs in treating DME.

If you have questions about treatments for DME, talk with your doctor.

Beovu for diabetic retinopathy (under study)

Diabetic retinopathy is a type of eye condition. It occurs when high blood sugar levels damage blood vessels in a part of the eye called the retina. Diabetic retinopathy affects people with diabetes.

Right now, the FDA has not approved Beovu to treat diabetic retinopathy. But researchers are studying if Beovu may be a safe and effective treatment option for the condition. Clinical trials like this one are comparing Beovu with laser surgery in people with diabetic retinopathy.

If you have questions about treatments for diabetic retinopathy, talk with your doctor.

Beovu for macular edema due to retinal vein occlusion (under study)

Researchers are investigating whether Beovu can help treat vision problems due to retinal vein occlusion. This is a blockage in a vein that carries blood away from the retina.

One study is comparing Beovu and aflibercept in the treatment of macular edema due to central retinal vein occlusion. “Central” refers to the retina’s central vein.

Another study is comparing how well Beovu and aflibercept can safely and effectively treat macular edema due to branch retinal vein occlusion. “Branch” means that the blockage is in the branch veins, which are smaller than the central vein.

If you have questions about treatments for retinal vein occlusion, talk with your doctor.

Beovu and children

It’s not known if Beovu is safe and effective for treating children. In clinical studies, researchers tested Beovu as a treatment for wet AMD in people ages 50 to 97 years.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Beovu, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for wet age-related macular degeneration

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) include:

  • aflibercept (Eylea)
  • bevacizumab (Avastin)
  • pegaptanib (Macugen)
  • ranibizumab (Lucentis)
  • verteporfin (Visudyne)

Antioxidants and minerals may also be a treatment option. A study called AREDS2 (Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2) looked at the benefit of a supplement combination that included vitamin C, vitamin E, zinc, copper, and others. Talk with your doctor to learn more about the AREDS2 formulation.

You may wonder how Beovu compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Beovu and Eylea are alike and different.

Ingredients

Beovu contains the active drug brolucizumab. Eylea contains the active drug aflibercept.

Beovu and Eylea belong to a class of drugs called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. Beovu and Eylea both help reduce the number of blood vessels and slow down fluid leakage.

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved both Beovu and Eylea to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Wet AMD is an eye disease in which damage to a part of the eye called the macula can lead to vision loss. Sometimes, doctors refer to “wet” as “neovascular.”

Eylea is also approved to treat the following eye conditions:

Beovu is not approved to treat other eye conditions at this time. However, researchers are looking to see if the drug can also help treat the eye conditions that Eylea treats. For more information, see the “Beovu for other conditions” section above.

Drug forms and administration

Beovu is available as a solution (liquid mixture) in a single-dose vial.

Eylea comes in two forms: a single-dose vial and a single-dose prefilled syringe.

Either drug is given as an injection into the eye by a healthcare provider.

You’ll most likely receive the drug once monthly for the first three doses. For Beovu, you’ll then typically have an injection once every 8 weeks to 12 weeks. And for Eyela, you’ll then usually have an injection once every 8 weeks, but it can be every 4 to 12 weeks.

Side effects and risks

Beovu and Eylea both contain an anti-VEGF drug. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Beovu and Eylea (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Beovu:
  • Can occur with Eylea:
    • pain where you received the injection
  • Can occur with Beovu and Eylea:
    • blurry vision
    • cataracts (cloudy spots in the lens of your eye)
    • broken blood vessels in the eye
    • eye floaters (moving spots or strings in your field of vision)
    • eye pain
    • swelling in the eye
    • vitreous detachment (separation of the gel inside your eye from a part of the eye called the retina)
    • retinal pigment epithelium tear (a condition in which the layer of cells beneath the retina tears)
    • damage to the cornea, which acts as a protective layer to the eye

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Beovu and Eylea (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Beovu:
    • blindness
  • Can occur with Eylea:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with both Beovu and Eylea:
    • endophthalmitis (pain, redness, and swelling inside the eye due to an infection)
    • detached retina (a condition that occurs when the retina pulls away from the support tissue in the back of your eye)
    • increased pressure in your eye

Effectiveness

The only condition both Beovu and Eylea are used to treat is wet AMD.

Two clinical studies have directly compared the use of Beovu and Eylea in treating wet AMD. Researchers looked at vision changes over 1 year in people with wet AMD. They received either Beovu or aflibercept (Eylea). The study involved measuring people’s vision changes using an eye chart to see how many letters they could read.

The Beovu group received treatment every 8 or 12 weeks. The researchers switched people who received Beovu every 12 weeks to an 8-week regimen based on their symptoms, if needed. The aflibercept group received treatment every 8 weeks. Both clinical studies showed that the Beovu group had similar vision changes to those in the aflibercept group.

  • In one study, people who received Beovu were able to read 6.6 more letters after a year of treatment. People who received aflibercept were able to read 6.8 more letters in the same time frame. And of those who received Beovu every 12 weeks, 56% of people had wet AMD that remained stable. This means that their condition didn’t worsen, so they didn’t need to have injections more frequently (every 8 weeks).
  • The second clinical study showed similar results. People who received Beovu were able to read 6.9 more letters compared with 7.6 more letters for people who received aflibercept. 51% of the people who took Beovu every 12 weeks had wet AMD that remained stable for a year.

The two studies were extended for another year, and the results at the end of that time were similar to the 1-year results.

Costs

Beovu and Eylea are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on WellRx.com, Beovu and Eylea cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan and where you live.

Like Eylea (above), the drug Lucentis has uses similar to those of Beovu. Here we look at Beovu and Lucentis are alike and different.

Ingredients

Beovu contains the active drug brolucizumab. Lucentis contains the active drug ranibizumab.

Beovu and Lucentis belong to a class of drugs called vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitors. A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way. Beovu and Lucentis both help reduce the number of blood vessels and slow down fluid leakage.

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved both Beovu and Lucentis to treat wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Wet AMD is an eye disease in which damage to a part of the eye called the macula can lead to vision loss. Sometimes, doctors refer to “wet” as “neovascular.”

Lucentis is also approved to treat the following eye conditions:

Beovu is not approved to treat other eye conditions at this time. However, researchers are looking to see if the drug can also help treat macular edema due to retinal vein occlusion, diabetic retinopathy, and diabetic macular edema. For more information, see the “Beovu for other conditions” section above.

Drug forms and administration

Beovu comes as a solution (liquid mixture) in a single-dose vial.

Lucentis come in two forms: a single-dose vial and a single-dose prefilled syringe.

Either drug is given as an injection into the eye by a healthcare provider. You’ll most likely receive the drug once a month for the first three doses, then once every 8 to 12 weeks. But in some cases, you may receive Lucentis as often as once a month.

Side effects and risks

Beovu and Lucentis both contain an anti-VEGF drug. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Beovu and Lucentis (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Beovu:
  • Can occur with Lucentis:
    • eye irritation
  • Can occur with both Beovu and Lucentis:
    • changes to your vision for a time after the injection, such as seeing less clearly
    • cataracts (cloudy spots in the lens of your eye)
    • broken blood vessels in the eye
    • eye floaters (moving spots or strings in your field of vision)
    • eye pain
    • swelling in the eye
    • vitreous detachment (separation of the gel inside your eye from a part of the eye called the retina)
    • blurry vision
    • watery eye

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Beovu and Lucentis (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Beovu:
    • blindness
  • Can occur with Lucentis:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with both Beovu and Lucentis:
    • endophthalmitis (pain, redness, and swelling inside the eye due to an infection)
    • detached retina (a condition that occurs when a part of the eye called the retina pulls away from the support tissue in the back of your eye)
    • increased pressure in your eye

Effectiveness

The only condition both Beovu and Lucentis are used to treat is wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Clinical studies have not directly compared these drugs, but studies have found both Beovu and Lucentis to be effective for treating wet AMD.

Costs

Beovu and Lucentis are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on WellRx.com, Beovu and Lucentis cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan and where you live.

There’s no known interaction between Beovu and alcohol at this time. If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink during your treatment with Beovu.

Beovu can interact with several other medications.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase the number of side effects or make them more severe.

Beovu and other medications

Researchers have not yet carried out studies into potential interactions between Beovu and other drugs. And there aren’t any drugs that have been specifically reported to interact with Beovu.

However, Beovu may interfere with glaucoma treatments. Glaucoma is a condition in which increased pressure in your eye can damage your eye nerve. The usual treatment is eye drops that help decrease the eye pressure. Sometimes Beovu can increase the pressure in your eye. So taking Beovu when you have glaucoma may reduce the effectiveness of your glaucoma treatment.

Be sure to let your doctor know if you’re using any medications for glaucoma before you start receiving Beovu.

Before you start using Beovu, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Beovu and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Beovu. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Beovu.

Beovu and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Beovu. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Beovu, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Beovu can vary. To find current prices for Beovu in your area, check out WellRx.com. The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you willpay depends on your insurance plan and where you live.

It isimportant to note that you may have to get Beovu from a specialty pharmacy, then bring the drug to your doctor’s office. A specialty pharmacy is a type of pharmacy that’s authorized to carry specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to ensure you use them safely and effectively.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before they approve coverage for Beovu. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if they will cover Beovu.

If you’re not sure whether you’ll need to get prior authorization for Beovu, contact your insurance plan.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Beovu or need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, the manufacturer of Beovu, offers a program called Beovu Your Way. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 888-612-3688 or visit the program website.

Beovu comes as a solution (liquid mixture) in a single-dose vial. A healthcare provider gives the drug as an intravitreal injection (injection into your eye).

Your eye doctor will first wash your eye with a special solution to lower the risk of infection. Then they’ll use local anesthetic drops or gel to numb your eye.

Afterward, your doctor will inject Beovu into the white of your eye. The drug will reach the vitreous cavity, which contains a jelly-like fluid that’s within your eye.

The entire process usually takes about 10 to 30 minutes.

How often Beovu is given

In the beginning of your treatment, you’ll typically receive a Beovu injection once every month (about 25 to 31 days). After the first three injections, you’ll likely receive an injection once every 8 to 12 weeks. Your doctor will explain how often you’ll receive Beovu based on how your eye responds to the drug.

If the drug is working well, you may need injections just once every 12 weeks. But if your doctor thinks that you could benefit from more frequent doses, you may receive injections once every 8 weeks.

To help make sure that you don’t miss an appointment for an injection, try setting a reminder on your phone or writing your treatment schedule on a calendar.

Wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) develops when abnormal blood vessels form under the part of the eye called the macula. The macula is responsible for sharp, clear vision at the center part of your vision. These blood vessels leak fluid, which can damage the macula. Over time, this can cause vision changes in which it’s hard to see things clearly.

Beovu contains brolucizumab, which is a human vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) inhibitor. VEGF is a protein that plays a role in making new blood vessels. Beovu blocks VEGF. This can help slow the growth of abnormal blood vessels that leak fluid into the macula.

How long does it take to work?

Clinical studies of Beovu showed that people’s vision improved after a year. However, you may see changes sooner or later than that. Your doctor will routinely monitor any differences in your sight. Talk with them about what to expect from your Beovu treatment.

It’s not known if Beovu is safe to use during pregnancy. However, based on how the drug works, it’s thought that Beovu could possibly cause harm to a fetus when used during pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the possible pros and cons of Beovu.

It’s not known if Beovu is safe to take during pregnancy.

If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Beovu.

For information about pregnancy, please see the “Beovu and pregnancy” section above.

You should not take Beovu while breastfeeding and for at least 1 month after you have your last dose of the drug. It’s not known if Beovu passes into breast milk or if it can affect breast milk production.

Before you start using Beovu, tell your doctor if you’re breastfeeding or are planning to breastfeed. They can recommend the best ways to feed your child and possible treatment options.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Beovu.

Does Beovu cure wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD)?

No. There’s no cure for wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD) right now, but Beovu may help control the condition long term. In many people, Beovu can help slow down the rate at which your vision worsens and may even improve vision.

If you have questions about using Beovu for wet AMD, talk with your doctor.

Why do I have to be monitored after each dose of Beovu?

Beovu can increase the pressure in your eye often within 30 minutes after you receive an injection. Because of this, your doctor will check your eye after each dose. They’ll have eyedrops on hand to help lower the pressure if you need it.

Also, your eye doctor will use drops to dilate (widen) your pupil. This gives them a chance to check your retina for any changes or problems. (Your retina lines the inside of the back of your eye.) Your doctor will also check your vision. You may have other tests, too.

If you have any questions about what to expect after your Beovu treatment, talk with your doctor.

Will I feel the injection of Beovu?

You may feel some pressure but not pain. Before each Beovu injection, your eye doctor will numb your eye using local anesthetic drops or gel. This will help minimize any discomfort. The doctor will also use a very thin needle when injecting Beovu.

If you have any concerns about Beovu injections, talk with your doctor.

Can I drive myself home after having a Beovu injection?

No, you should not drive after receiving a Beovu injection.

Before your doctor gives you an injection, they’ll use drops to dilate (widen) your pupil. This helps your doctor see what’s going on in the retina, which is in the back part of your eye. But dilating your pupil can make your eyes more sensitive to light for a period of time. The injection itself can also affect your vision for a while. So after having an injection, you’ll need to arrange for someone to drive you home.

If you need a ride home from your doctor’s office after an injection, help is available. Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation, the manufacturer of Beovu, offers a program called Beovu Your Way. You can learn about possible transportation choices through the program. For more information, call 888-612-3688 or visit the program website.

How can I track any vision changes while taking Beovu?

To monitor your vision during your Beovu treatment, you can use an Amsler grid routinely as your doctor recommends. This grid helps you notice any changes in your vision. Checking for any differences in your sight helps your doctor know how well Beovu is working to treat your wet AMD.

In a healthy eye, the grid lines should look straight. If you notice any changes in your vision, such as wavy grid lines or blind spots, call your doctor right away. Keep a diary to track your results and bring it to your doctor visits.

This drug comes with several precautions. Before taking Beovu, talk with your doctor about your health history. Beovu may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Eye infections. You should not receive Beovu if you have an infection in or around your eye. You’ll first need to treat the infection. Then you and your doctor can decide if you can start or keep having the Beovu treatment.
  • Eye inflammation. You should not receive Beovu if you have inflammation (redness, swelling, or pain) in or around your eye. You’ll first need to have your eye checked and treated if necessary. Then you and your doctor can decide if you can start or keep having the Beovu treatment.
  • Allergy to Beovu. You should not receive Beovu if you’re allergic to brolucizumab (the active drug in Beovu) or any of its inactive ingredients. Your doctor can tell you what these are and decide if Beovu is right for you.
  • Glaucoma. Beovu can increase the pressure in your eye. So if you have glaucoma (a condition that causes increased pressure in your eye), Beovu could make your glaucoma worse. Talk with your doctor about whether Beovu is right for you.
  • Heart disease. In rare cases, Beovu may increase the risk of blood clots that can lead to a heart attack or stroke. So if you have heart disease, talk with your doctor. Your doctor can decide whether Beovu is right for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Beovu is safe to receive during pregnancy. For more information, please see the “Beovu and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Beovu isn’t recommended for use while breastfeeding. For more information, please see the “Beovu and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Beovu, see the “Beovu side effects” section above.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Beovu for the treatment of neovascular (wet) age-related macular degeneration (AMD).

Mechanism of action

Beovu contains the recombinant monoclonal antibody fragment called brolucizumab. The drug is given by injection directly into the vitreous to provide local effect in the eye.

Brolucizumab is an inhibitor of vascular endothelial growth factor-A (VEGF). By binding to VEGF, brolucizumab reduces endothelial cell proliferation, vascular permeability, and neovascularization in the retina and macula. This reduces macula edema and retinal damage.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

After 24 hours post-injection, the mean Cmax (maximum concentration) of free brolucizumab in the systemic circulation was 49 ng/mL.

The drug concentrations were close to or below 0.5 ng/mL (lower limit of detectable concentration) about 4 weeks after the dose was repeated. Free brolucizumab did not accumulate with repeat dosing in most patients.

Beovu has a half-life of about 4.4 days after a single intravitreal dose. And it’s metabolized through proteolysis.

Contraindications

Beovu must not be used in people with:

  • ocular or periocular infections
  • active intraocular inflammation
  • hypersensitivity to any ingredients of Beovu

Storage

Store the Beovu vial in a refrigerator (36°F to 46°F / 2°C to 8°C). Do not freeze the vial. Keep the vial in its original carton to protect from light.

Before using Beovu, bring the vial to room temperature. Keep the unopened vial at room temperature (68°F to 77°F / 20°C to 25°C) for no longer than 24 hours.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.