CellCept is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection* after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant in adults. It’s also FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant in children ages 3 months and older.

CellCept is an immunosuppressant (a drug that weakens your immune system). Specifically, CellCept is a type of immunosuppressant called an antirejection drug. These drugs make your body less likely to reject a transplanted organ. CellCept is used with other antirejection drugs to help prevent organ rejection.

* Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.

Drug details

CellCept contains the active drug mycophenolate mofetil. CellCept works by preventing immune cells from multiplying. This lowers your immune system’s ability to attack the newly transplanted organ.

CellCept is available as capsules, tablets, and a liquid that you swallow. It’s also available as an intravenous (IV) infusion* (an injection into a vein over a period of time) that’s given by your doctor. You’ll likely take CellCept twice per day.

Each form of CellCept comes in different strengths. For more information, see the “CellCept dosage” section below.

* The IV infusion is used for people who aren’t able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid. In this situation, your doctor may give you the CellCept infusion for up to 14 days. However, as soon as you’re able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid, your doctor will likely stop giving you the infusion form.

Effectiveness

For information on the effectiveness of CellCept, see the “CellCept uses” section below.

CellCept is available as a generic drug called mycophenolate mofetil. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

In some cases, the brand-name drug and the generic version may come in different forms and strengths.

CellCept can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking CellCept. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of CellCept, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with CellCept, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of CellCept can include:*

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from CellCept. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view CellCept’s Medication Guide.
† For more information on these side effects, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from CellCept aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information on these side effects, see “Side effect details” below.
CellCept has boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “Boxed warnings” under “Side effect details” below.

Side effects in children

CellCept is FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant in children ages 3 months and older.

In clinical studies, certain side effects occurred more often in children who took CellCept than in adults.

Side effects that were more common in children include:

  • anemia (low number of red blood cells)
  • diarrhea
  • fever
  • hypertension (high blood pressure)
  • leukopenia (low counts of certain white blood cells)
  • sore throat
  • abdominal (belly) pain
  • vomiting
  • infections, such as the common cold
  • sepsis (a life threatening response to an infection)

For more information on these side effects, see the “Mild side effects” and “Serious side effects” sections above.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug, or whether certain side effects pertain to it. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may or may not cause.

Boxed warnings

CellCept has boxed warnings for pregnancy, serious infections, and cancers. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA.

Pregnancy

See the “CellCept and pregnancy” section below to learn about the risks of taking this drug during pregnancy.

Serious infections

Taking CellCept can increase your risk for serious infections. (Infections that happen after taking medications that weaken your immune system, such as CellCept, are sometimes called opportunistic infections.)

Symptoms of infection can vary depending on whether it’s bacterial, viral, or fungal. Possible symptoms of infection include:

  • fever
  • muscle aches
  • rash
  • redness, heat, pain, or swelling in the infected area
  • runny nose

In clinical studies of adults, CellCept was compared with azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran) and a placebo. (Azathioprine is an antirejection drug like CellCept. A placebo is a treatment with no active drug.)

In the studies:

  • 27.4% to 39.9% of adults who were given CellCept had an infection
  • 24.9% to 33.7% of adults using azathioprine had an infection
  • 37.3% of adults using a placebo had an infection

The percentage of adults who had an infection after taking these drugs varied depending on the type of infection and the condition being treated.

In rare cases, taking CellCept can lead to serious infections that cause sepsis (a life threatening response to an infection) or death. In clinical studies:

  • 2% of adults who used CellCept for a heart or kidney transplant died from a serious infection
  • 5% of adults who used CellCept for a liver transplant died from a serious infection

In these studies, it isn’t known how many people may have died from a serious infection while using other treatments.

If you’re concerned about getting a serious infection while using CellCept, talk with your doctor. They can discuss ways to lower your risk.

Cancers

Taking CellCept may increase your risk for certain types of cancers, including lymphoma (a type of cancer that starts in your white blood cells) and skin cancer.

Symptoms of cancer may include:

Symptoms of lymphoma can be similar to symptoms of the common cold, such as fever and a runny or stuffy nose. Lymphoma may also cause swollen lymph nodes that are painful to touch.

Signs of skin cancer include moles or skin spots that are new, have grown, or have changed color. (Skin spots may look pink, brown, scaly, or crusty.)

In clinical studies of people using CellCept:

  • 0.4% to 1% of adults developed a type of lymphoma (depending on the condition being treated)
  • 1.35% of children developed a type of lymphoma
  • 1.6% to 4.2% of adults developed skin cancer
  • 0.7% to 2.1% of adults developed other types of cancer

The percentage of people who may have developed cancer while taking other treatments in these studies isn’t known.

To decrease your risk for skin cancer while using CellCept, you should limit your time spent in the sun. While outdoors, wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen. Also wear clothing that covers your skin, such as a hat and a long-sleeved shirt.

If you have fair-toned skin or a family history of skin cancer, your risk of getting skin cancer while using CellCept may be even higher.

Before starting treatment, talk with your doctor about your risk for cancer while using CellCept.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking CellCept. It’s not known how many people may have experienced this side effect after taking CellCept in clinical studies.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to CellCept. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Weight loss

Taking CellCept may cause unexplained weight loss. It isn’t known how many people may have had unexplained weight loss after using CellCept in clinical studies. In addition, the amount of weight that people may have lost while using CellCept in these studies isn’t known.

However, unexplained weight loss can also be a sign of cancer. (Cancer is a possible serious side effect of CellCept. For more information, see the “Boxed warnings” section above.) Tell your doctor about any weight loss that you experience while using CellCept. To better understand your condition, they may ask about other symptoms you’re experiencing.

Depression

Depression is a possible side effect of CellCept. In clinical studies of adults, CellCept was compared with azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran) and a placebo (a treatment with no active drug).

In these studies:

  • 20.1% of adults who were given CellCept after a heart transplant had depression
  • 15.2% of adults who were given azathioprine after a heart transplant had depression

It isn’t known how many people who used a placebo may have had depression. In addition, the percentage of people who may have had depression while using CellCept for other types of transplants isn’t known.

Symptoms of depression may include:

  • fatigue (lack of energy)
  • loss of interest in activities you once enjoyed
  • more or less appetite than usual
  • sleeping more or less than usual
  • trouble concentrating or making decisions

Tell your doctor right away if you have any signs of depression while using CellCept. They can recommend a different treatment for your condition. They may also recommend treatments to help with your depression.

Rash

Some people may experience a rash while taking CellCept.

In clinical studies, CellCept was compared with azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran) and a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) in adults who’d had a heart transplant. The results showed that:

  • 26% of adults who used CellCept had a rash
  • 20.8% of adults who used azathioprine had a rash

It isn’t known how many people may have had a rash after using a placebo or after using CellCept for other types of transplants.

If you experience a rash while using CellCept, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to treat this side effect.

Anemia

Anemia (low number of red blood cells) may happen while taking CellCept. In clinical studies of adults, CellCept was compared with azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran) and a placebo (a treatment with no active drug). The results showed that:

  • 20% to 45% of adults who used CellCept had anemia
  • 23.6% to 53% of adults who used azathioprine had anemia
  • 2.4% of adults who used a placebo had anemia

The percentage of adults who had anemia after taking these drugs varied depending on the type of infection and the condition being treated.

The most common symptom of anemia is fatigue (lack of energy). Other symptoms of anemia may include chest pain, shortness of breath, headache, and irregular or fast heart rate.

Your doctor will likely check your red blood cell count before you start using CellCept. They’ll likely also check your red blood cell counts regularly during your treatment. If you have questions about getting anemia while using CellCept, talk with your doctor.

Hair loss (not a side effect)

Hair loss isn’t a side effect of CellCept that’s been reported in clinical studies. However, hair loss is a possible side effect of other drugs that are used with CellCept to help prevent organ rejection, such as tacrolimus (Prograf). Hair loss may also happen after an organ transplant.

If you’re concerned about hair loss while using CellCept, talk with your doctor.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as CellCept to treat certain conditions. CellCept may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

CellCept for preventing organ rejection after a transplant

CellCept is FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant in adults. It’s also FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant in children ages 3 months and older.

CellCept is an immunosuppressant (a drug that weakens your immune system). Specifically, CellCept is a type of immunosuppressant called an antirejection drug. These drugs make your body less likely to reject a transplanted organ. CellCept is used with other antirejection drugs to help prevent organ rejection.

What happens with organ rejection

Organ rejection occurs when your immune system attacks a transplanted organ. This happens because the immune system doesn’t recognize the new organ as part of your body. As a way of protecting your body, your immune system will try to get rid of it.

To help lessen this immune system reaction, your doctor will order several tests for you and the organ donor before your transplant. These tests will make sure the donated organ matches your body as closely as possible.

Organ rejection can happen within days or weeks of the transplant. But it can also happen several years after the transplant. For this reason, it’s important to keep taking CellCept and other antirejection drugs for as long as your doctor prescribes them.

Effectiveness for preventing organ rejection after a transplant

CellCept has been found effective for preventing organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant in adults. CellCept has also been found effective for preventing organ rejection after a kidney transplant in children ages 3 months and older.

CellCept for heart transplant

In clinical studies of adults, CellCept was compared with azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran). (Azathioprine is an antirejection drug, like CellCept.) Both drugs were given with corticosteroids and cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). (Cyclosporine is another antirejection drug.)

After 6 months of treatment:

  • 32% of adults who used CellCept experienced an organ rejection
  • 35% of adults who used azathioprine experienced an organ rejection

After 1 year of treatment:

  • 6.2% of adults who used CellCept required a new heart transplant or died
  • 11.4% of adults who used azathioprine required a new heart transplant or died

It’s important to note that your results while using CellCept may vary from those seen in clinical studies. If you have questions about whether CellCept is right for you, talk with your doctor.

CellCept for liver transplant

CellCept was compared with azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran) in clinical studies of adults who had a liver transplant. Both drugs were given with corticosteroids and cyclosporine (Neoral).

After 6 months of treatment:

  • 38.5% of adults who used CellCept experienced an organ rejection
  • 47.7% of adults who were used azathioprine experienced an organ rejection

After 1 year of treatment:

  • 14.7% of adults who used CellCept required a new heart transplant or died
  • 14.6% of adults who used azathioprine required a new heart transplant or died

It’s important to note that your results while using CellCept may vary from those seen in clinical studies. If you have questions about whether CellCept is right for you, talk with your doctor.

CellCept for kidney transplant

In clinical studies of adults, CellCept was compared with azathioprine and a placebo (a treatment with no active drug). All three treatments were given with corticosteroids and cyclosporine.

Researchers wanted to see how effective each treatment was at preventing treatment failure. Treatment failure was defined as:

  • organ rejection (when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ)
  • death
  • stopping the study early for any reason other than organ rejection

After 6 months:

  • 30.3% to 38.8% of adults using CellCept experienced treatment failure
  • 47.6% to 50% of adults using azathioprine experienced treatment failure
  • 56% of adults using a placebo experienced treatment failure

The percentage of adults who experienced treatment failure varied depending on the dose being studied and the country where the study took place.

In a clinical study of children ages 3 months and older, CellCept was given with corticosteroids and cyclosporine. After 12 months of treatment:

  • 5% of children experienced organ rejection
  • 2% of children died while receiving CellCept for their kidney transplant

These results were similar to the results observed in adults using CellCept for kidney transplants.

It’s important to note that your child’s results may vary from those seen in clinical trials. If you have questions about whether CellCept is right for your child, talk with their doctor.

Off-label uses for CellCept

In addition to the use listed above, CellCept may be used off-label for other purposes. Off-label drug use is when a drug that’s approved for one or more uses is prescribed for a different one that’s not approved. Below are examples of off-label uses for CellCept.

CellCept for lupus

CellCept isn’t FDA-approved to treat lupus. However, clinical guidelines recommend using CellCept for lupus in adults who also have signs of kidney disease. It may be used with hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil), a drug that’s FDA-approved to treat lupus. Clinical studies have also found CellCept effective for this off-label use in children.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about using CellCept for lupus.

CellCept for myasthenia gravis

CellCept isn’t FDA-approved to treat myasthenia gravis (a disease of the nerves and muscles). However, clinical studies have shown CellCept to be an effective treatment for this condition in adults and in children.

If you have questions about using CellCept for the treatment of myasthenia gravis, talk with your doctor.

CellCept for scleroderma

Treating scleroderma isn’t an FDA-approved use for CellCept. (Scleroderma is a condition that affects the body’s skin and tissues.) However, clinical studies have found it to be effective when used off-label to treat this condition in adults and in children.

For more information about using CellCept to treat scleroderma, talk with your doctor.

CellCept for other off-label uses

CellCept may also be used off-label for other conditions, including:

If you’d like more information on the use of CellCept in treating these conditions, talk with your doctor.

CellCept and children

CellCept is FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection* after a kidney transplant in children ages 3 months and older. For more information, see the “CellCept for preventing organ rejection after a transplant” section above.

* Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.

As with all medications, the cost of CellCept can vary. To find current prices for CellCept tablets (or other forms) in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your treatment plan, your location, and if applicable, the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for CellCept, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for CellCept, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for CellCept, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Genentech, the manufacturer of CellCept, offers the CellCept Co-pay Card. This card may help lower the cost of the drug for you. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 833-CellCept (833-235-5237) or visit the CellCept Patient Assistance page.

Generic version

CellCept is available in a generic form called mycophenolate mofetil. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. And generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs. To find out how the cost of mycophenolate mofetil compares to the cost of CellCept, visit GoodRx.com.

If your doctor has prescribed CellCept and you’re interested in using mycophenolate mofetil instead, talk with your doctor. They may have a preference for one version or the other. You’ll also need to check your insurance plan, as it may only cover one or the other.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about CellCept.

Is CellCept chemotherapy?

No, CellCept isn’t a chemotherapy drug. Chemotherapy drugs work by destroying all cells that are growing quickly. This works in cancer treatment because cancer cells grow more quickly than normal healthy cells.

However, chemotherapy drugs can’t tell the difference between healthy cells and cancer cells. Therefore, healthy cells are often damaged by chemotherapy. This can lead to side effects from the chemotherapy drug.

CellCept is a type of immunosuppressant drug (also known as an antirejection drug). It works by preventing immune cells from multiplying. This lowers your immune system’s ability to attack a newly transplanted organ.

If you have questions about using CellCept to help prevent organ rejection, talk with your doctor.

Will I have any side effects when I stop taking CellCept?

Possibly. If you stop taking CellCept suddenly, you may have a serious side effect called organ rejection. This occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.

Symptoms of organ rejection may include:

Having symptoms of organ rejection doesn’t necessarily mean that your transplant has failed or that you’ll need another transplant. But if you do have any of these symptoms, tell your doctor right away so they can treat your condition.

To help prevent organ rejection, don’t stop taking CellCept without first discussing the risks with your doctor.

Can CellCept be used to treat lupus?

Yes, CellCept may be used off-label to treat lupus. This means CellCept isn’t FDA-approved to treat lupus. However, clinical guidelines recommend using CellCept for this purpose in people who also have signs of kidney disease.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about using CellCept for lupus.

Does CellCept cause weight gain?

Possibly. Weight gain wasn’t a side effect reported in clinical studies of CellCept. However, swelling in the ankles, feet, or legs can occur with this drug. This extra fluid in your body can make it seem like you’ve gained weight.

Weight gain is also a possible symptom of organ rejection. If you experience weight gain while using CellCept, tell your doctor. They may want to monitor you more closely to make sure the medication is working for you.

Can I drive while taking CellCept?

You may be able to drive while taking CellCept. However, you should understand how the drug affects you before driving. CellCept can cause symptoms that may interfere with your ability to drive, such as:

  • dizziness
  • confusion
  • sleepiness
  • tremor

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about driving while using CellCept.

Can I donate blood during my CellCept treatment?

No, you shouldn’t donate blood while taking CellCept. You also shouldn’t donate semen while taking this drug. To learn more, see the “CellCept precautions” section below.

The CellCept dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type of organ transplant you’re using CellCept for
  • your age
  • the form of CellCept you take
  • other medical conditions you may have
  • in children, their body surface area

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

CellCept is available in the following forms and strengths:

  • capsules, available in one strength of 250 milligrams (mg)
  • tablets, available in one strength of 500 mg
  • liquid that you swallow, available in one strength of 200 mg per milliliter (mL) of liquid
  • intravenous (IV) infusion* that’s given into a vein over a period of time by your doctor, available in one strength of 500 mg per vial

The first oral dose of CellCept is given as soon as possible after a kidney, heart, or liver transplant. The IV infusion is given within 24 hours of a transplant.

* The CellCept IV infusion is used for people who aren’t able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid. In this situation, your doctor may give you the CellCept infusion for up to 14 days. However, as soon as you’re able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid, your doctor will likely stop giving you the infusion form.

Dosage for preventing organ rejection after a transplant

The dosage for CellCept varies depending on its use. Below are the typical doses for preventing organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant in adults. (Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.)

Dosage for adults receiving kidney transplant

The typical dosage of CellCept for preventing rejection of a kidney transplant is 1,000 mg taken twice per day. If you’re taking a form of CellCept that’s swallowed, in most cases you should take it on an empty stomach. This means taking your dose either 1 hour before eating or 2 hours after eating. (For more information, see the “Taking CellCept with food” section below.)

If you’re receiving the CellCept IV infusion, the dose is given by your doctor over a period of about 2 hours, twice per day.

Dosage for adults receiving heart transplant

The typical dosage of CellCept for preventing rejection of a heart transplant is 1,500 mg taken twice per day. If you’re taking a form of CellCept that’s swallowed, in most cases you should take it on an empty stomach. This means taking your dose either 1 hour before eating or 2 hours after eating. (For more information, see the “Taking CellCept with food” section below.)

If you’re receiving the CellCept IV infusion, the dose is given by your doctor over a period of about 2 hours, twice per day.

Dosage for adults receiving liver transplant

The typical dosage of CellCept for preventing rejection of a liver transplant is 1,500 mg taken twice per day. If you’re taking a form of CellCept that’s swallowed, in most cases you should take it on an empty stomach. This means taking your dose either 1 hour before eating or 2 hours after eating. (For more information, see the “Taking CellCept with food” section below.)

If you’re receiving the CellCept IV infusion, the typical dosage is 1,000 mg given twice per day. Each infusion is given by your doctor over a period of about 2 hours.

Pediatric dosage

CellCept is approved to help prevent organ rejection in children ages 3 months and older after a kidney transplant. (Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.)

The typical dosage for this purpose is 600 mg per square meter (m2) of body surface area (a measure of the size of their body) given twice daily.

To give an example, for a child whose body surface area is 1.25 m2, the typical dose is 750 mg taken twice per day. Your child’s doctor will know how to calculate your child’s body surface area to determine the correct dose.

The maximum recommended dose for this condition is 1,000 mg taken twice per day.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of CellCept, take your missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it’s within 2 hours of when you’re supposed to take your next dose, just skip the missed dose. Then take your next dose at its usual time.

Don’t take an extra dose to make up for your missed dose. This can raise your risk for side effects. (For more information, see the “CellCept side effects” section above.)

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

CellCept is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that CellCept is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely continue taking it for as long as you have your transplanted organ.

Other drugs are available that can prevent organ rejection.* Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to CellCept, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for preventing organ rejecting after a transplant

Examples of other drugs that may be used to help prevent organ rejection after a transplant include:

Some of these medications may be taken along with CellCept. To learn more, see the “CellCept use with other drugs” section.

* Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.

You may wonder how CellCept compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how CellCept and Myfortic are alike and different.

Ingredients

CellCept contains the active ingredient mycophenolate mofetil. Myfortic contains the active ingredient mycophenolic acid.

Both drugs belong to a group of medications called immunosuppressants (drugs that weaken your immune system). Specifically, CellCept and Myfortic are a type of immunosuppressant called antirejection drugs. They make your body less likely to reject a transplanted organ.

Uses

Both CellCept and Myfortic are FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a kidney transplant in adults and in children.* Both drugs are used with other immunosuppressants, such as corticosteroids and cyclosporine.

CellCept is also FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a heart or liver transplant in adults.

* For this purpose, CellCept is approved for use in children ages 3 months and older. Myfortic is approved for use in children ages 5 years and older who had a kidney transplant more than 6 months before starting the drug.

Drug forms and administration

Both CellCept and Myfortic are available as tablets that you swallow. Both types of tablets are typically taken twice per day.

If you’re taking CellCept or Myfortic tablets, or other forms of CellCept that are swallowed, in most cases you should take them on an empty stomach. This means taking your dose either 1 hour before eating or 2 hours after eating.

CellCept is also available as capsules, a liquid that you swallow, and a liquid that’s given by intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein over a period of time).

The forms of CellCept that are swallowed are all typically taken twice per day. The IV infusion* is given by your doctor over a period of about 2 hours, twice per day.

* The CellCept IV infusion is used for people who aren’t able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid. In this situation, your doctor may give you the CellCept infusion for up to 14 days. However, as soon as you’re able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid, your doctor will likely stop giving you the infusion form.

Side effects and risks

CellCept and Myfortic have some similar side effects and others that vary. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both CellCept and Myfortic (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with CellCept, with Myfortic, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

* CellCept and Myfortic have boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see the “Boxed warnings” section under “Side effect details.”

Effectiveness

CellCept and Myfortic have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to help prevent organ rejection after kidney transplant.

The use of CellCept and Myfortic in preventing organ rejection after kidney transplant has been directly compared in a clinical study. Myfortic was found to be as effective as CellCept at preventing organ rejection.

Costs

CellCept and Myfortic are both brand-name drugs. CellCept is available as a generic drug called mycophenolate mofetil. Myfortic is available as a generic drug called mycophenolate sodium. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, CellCept tablets may be significantly more expensive than Myfortic tablets. But the generic versions of CellCept tablets cost about the same as the generic version of Myfortic tablets.

To learn about the cost of other forms of CellCept, go to GoodRx.com or talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

The actual price you’ll pay for any of these drugs depends on the form you use, your treatment plan, your insurance plan, your location, and if applicable, the pharmacy you use. To learn about the cost of CellCept infusion, talk with your doctor.

CellCept and Prograf are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how these drugs are alike and different.

Ingredients

CellCept contains the active ingredient mycophenolate mofetil. Prograf contains the active ingredient tacrolimus.

Both drugs belong to a group of medications called immunosuppressants (drugs that weaken your immune system). Specifically, CellCept and Prograf are a type of immunosuppressant called antirejection drugs. They make your body less likely to reject a transplanted organ.

Uses

Both CellCept and Prograf are FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection* after a:

For this use, both drugs are used with other immunosuppressants.

Prograf is also FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a heart or liver transplant in children.‡

* Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.
† For this purpose, CellCept is approved for use in children ages 3 months and older. To learn about using Prograf in children, talk with your child’s doctor.
‡ To learn about using Prograf in children, talk with your child’s doctor.

Drug forms and administration

Both CellCept and Prograf are available as capsules that you swallow and as an intravenous (IV) infusion* (an injection into a vein over a period of time). The capsule forms of both drugs are typically taken twice per day. Both types of infusions are given by your doctor.

The CellCept infusion is given over a period of about 2 hours, twice per day. The Prograf infusion is given as a continuous infusion, which can last from a few hours to days.

CellCept is also available as a tablets and as a liquid that you swallow. Both of these forms are typically taken twice per day. Prograf is also available in granules that are mixed with water to form a liquid that you swallow. This form of Prograf is also typically taken twice per day.

In most cases, you should take CellCept on an empty stomach (1 hour before eating or 2 hours after eating). Prograf can be taken with or without food.

* The CellCept IV infusion is used for people who aren’t able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid. In this situation, your doctor may give you the CellCept infusion for up to 14 days. However, as soon as you’re able to swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid, your doctor will likely stop giving you the infusion form.

Side effects and risks

CellCept and Prograf have some similar side effects and others that vary. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both CellCept and Prograf (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with CellCept, with Prograf, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

* CellCept and Prograf have boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see the “Boxed warnings” section under “Side effect details.”

Effectiveness

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, studies have found both CellCept and Prograf considered to be effective for preventing organ rejection.

Costs

CellCept and Prograf are both brand-name drugs. CellCept is available as a generic drug called mycophenolate mofetil. Prograf is available as a generic drug called tacrolimus. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, CellCept capsules cost more than Prograf capsules. The generic version of CellCept capsules generally cost more than generic version of the Prograf capsules. To learn about the cost of other forms of CellCept or Prograf, go to GoodRx.com or talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

The actual price you’ll pay for any of these drugs depends on the form you use, your treatment plan, your insurance plan, your location, and if applicable, the pharmacy you use. To learn about the cost of the CellCept infusion and Prograf granules, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

There aren’t any known interactions between CellCept and alcohol. However, your doctor may recommend you limit the amount of alcohol you drink after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant. This is because drinking alcohol can lead to health problems that cause extra strain on your transplanted organ, such as hypertension (high blood pressure).

Your reason for needing an organ transplant can also affect the amount of alcohol that’s safe for you to drink. For example, if you’ve had a liver transplant because of alcohol misuse, your doctor may tell you to stop drinking alcohol entirely.

If you drink alcohol and have questions about drinking alcohol while using CellCept or after having an organ transplant, talk with your doctor.

CellCept can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

CellCept and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with CellCept. This list doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with CellCept.

Before taking CellCept, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

CellCept and antacids

CellCept can interact with antacids (medications used to relieve heartburn or indigestion) that contain magnesium hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide. If taken with CellCept, these antacids can lower the amount of CellCept in your body. This can make CellCept less effective.

Examples of antacids that contain magnesium hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide include:

  • aluminum hydroxide/magnesium carbonate (Gaviscon)
  • magnesium hydroxide (milk of magnesia)
  • aluminum hydroxide/magnesium hydroxide/simethicone (Mylanta)

To lower the risk of this interaction, it’s recommended that you take antacids at least 2 hours before or 2 hours after your dose of CellCept. If you have questions about using CellCept with antacids, talk with your doctor.

CellCept and proton pump inhibitors

Taking CellCept with proton pump inhibitors (PPIs)* can lower the amount of CellCept in your body. This can make CellCept less effective.

Examples of PPIs include:

Before you start using CellCept, be sure to tell your doctor if you take any PPIs. Your doctor may want to monitor your treatment with CellCept more closely.

* PPIs are medications used to treat conditions such as heartburn or gastroesophageal reflux disease.

CellCept and certain antibiotics

Certain antibiotics (medications used to treat infection) can lower the amount of CellCept in your body. This can make CellCept less effective. For this reason, your doctor will likely need to prescribe other antibiotics to treat your infection.

Examples of antibiotics that may need to be avoided while taking CellCept include:

  • trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole (Bactrim)
  • rifampin (Rifadin)
  • cephalosporins, such as cephalexin (Keflex)
  • fluoroquinolones, such as levofloxacin (Levaquin)
  • penicillins, such as amoxicillin

Be sure to tell your doctor if you’re taking any antibiotics while using CellCept.

CellCept and certain drugs that treat high cholesterol

Taking CellCept with cholestyramine (Prevalite) can make CellCept less effective by lowering the amount of CellCept in your body. (Cholestyramine is a drug used to treat high cholesterol.)

If you’re taking cholestyramine, be sure to tell your doctor before using CellCept. Your doctor may prescribe a different treatment for your condition.

CellCept and drugs that affect its metabolism

CellCept is metabolized (broken down) in the body by a process called glucuronidation. Other medications that affect this process can slow the breakdown of CellCept in your body. This could raise your blood levels of CellCept and increase your risk for side effects from CellCept. (For more information on the drug’s side effects, see “CellCept side effects” above.)

Telmisartan (Micardis) is an example of a drug that can affect how CellCept is broken down in the body.

Before using CellCept, be sure to tell your doctor about any other medications you’re taking. They can help determine if these medications will affect the breakdown of CellCept in your body.

CellCept and phosphate binders

Phosphate binders are a group of drugs that are used to remove high levels of phosphate from your body. (Phosphate is a chemical that naturally occurs in the body.)

Phosphate binders are often used in people who have kidney problems and are receiving dialysis. Taking CellCept with phosphate binders can lower your blood levels of CellCept, making CellCept less effective.

Sevelamer (Renvela, Renagel) is an example of a phosphate binder.

If you take phosphate binders, it’s recommended that you take them at least 2 hours before or 2 hours after your dose of CellCept. If you have questions about using CellCept with phosphate binders, talk with your doctor.

CellCept and drugs that leave the body through kidney tubules

Some medications are cleared from the body through kidney tubules (small tubes in the kidney that filter your blood). Taking CellCept with drugs that are cleared from the body in this way can increase the levels of these drugs in your body. This can raise your risk for side effects from drugs that are cleared through kidney tubules.

Examples of these medications include:

  • acyclovir (Zovirax)
  • probenecid (Probalan)
  • valacyclovir (Valtrex)

Before you start CellCept, tell your doctor about any medications you’re taking. They can determine if you’re taking a medication that’s eliminated from the body by this pathway.

CellCept and certain birth control pills

Taking CellCept with certain birth control pills can make these pills less effective. This is especially true for birth control pills that contain the active drug levonorgestrel.

Examples of birth control pills that contain levonorgestrel include Seasonique and Twirla.

If you take birth control pills, talk with your doctor before using CellCept. Your doctor can determine if you’re taking a birth control pill that contains levonorgestrel.

CellCept and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with CellCept. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking CellCept.

CellCept and foods

You don’t have to avoid eating any specific type of food during your CellCept treatment. However, it’s important to note that you should avoid eating at least 1 hour before and 2 hours after taking CellCept in most cases. This is because taking CellCept with food lowers the level of the drug in your body, which may make it less effective. (For more information, see the “Taking CellCept with food” section below.)

CellCept and vaccines

You should avoid getting live vaccines while taking CellCept. A live vaccine contains a weakened form of the virus or bacteria that it helps prevent.

Live vaccines usually don’t cause infections in people with healthy immune systems. However, live vaccines could cause infections in people whose immune systems are weakened, including those taking immunosuppressants such as CellCept.

Examples of live vaccines include:

In most cases, you should avoid getting live vaccines while taking CellCept and for at least 3 months after you stop taking the drug. This is because live vaccines generally require a healthy immune system to be effective. Because CellCept weakens your immune system, getting a live vaccine while taking CellCept can make the live vaccine less effective.

Talk with your doctor about whether you’re up to date on all recommended vaccines before starting CellCept.

You should take CellCept according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

CellCept comes in several forms:

  • capsules, tablets, and liquid that you swallow
  • intravenous (IV) infusion (an injection into a vein over a period of time) given by a healthcare provider

When to take

You’ll likely take CellCept twice per day. Try to take your doses around the same time each day. This helps ensure you have a consistent amount of the drug in your body.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking CellCept with food

You should avoid eating at least 1 hour before and 2 hours after taking CellCept. However, if your transplant is stable, you may take CellCept with or without food. (Having a “stable” transplant means you aren’t experiencing any symptoms of organ rejection.*) Talk with your doctor about whether or not your condition is stable enough to take this drug with food.

* Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.

Can CellCept be crushed, split, or chewed?

No, CellCept tablets or capsules can’t be crushed, split, or chewed. If you have trouble swallowing the tablets or capsules, talk with your doctor. CellCept is available in other forms, including a liquid that you swallow and an infusion that’s given by a healthcare provider.

If your skin comes in contact with the powder from CellCept capsules or the liquid that you swallow, wash the affected area of skin right away. This is because exposure to the CellCept powder or liquid may cause birth defects or miscarriage (loss of pregnancy).

You should wash the affected area of skin right away, even if you aren’t able to get pregnant. This helps make sure you don’t transfer the powder or liquid to a surface that might be touched by someone who’s pregnant.

CellCept is FDA-approved to help prevent organ rejection after a heart, kidney, or liver transplant in adults. (Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.)

CellCept is an immunosuppressant (a drug that weakens your immune system). Specifically, CellCept is a type of immunosuppressant called an antirejection drug. These drugs make your body less likely to reject a transplanted organ. CellCept is used with other antirejection drugs to help prevent organ rejection.

What happens with organ rejection

Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ. This happens because the immune system doesn’t recognize the new organ as part of your body. As a way of protecting your body, your immune system will try to get rid of it.

This reaction is a natural process that happens in your body when your immune system detects other unknown substances, such as bacteria. However, with an organ transplant, this process is harmful to your new organ.

Even while taking CellCept or other antirejection drugs, you’ll likely have at least one episode of organ rejection after a transplant. Symptoms of organ rejection may include:

It’s important to note that having symptoms of organ rejection doesn’t necessarily mean that your transplant has failed or that you’ll need another transplant. However, if you do have any of these symptoms, tell your doctor right away so they can treat your condition.

What CellCept does

CellCept is an antirejection drug that works by preventing immune cells from multiplying. This lowers your immune system’s ability to attack the newly transplanted organ.

How long does it take to work?

It can take up to 12 weeks for CellCept to start working to help prevent organ rejection. If you aren’t having any symptoms of organ rejection, you may not notice CellCept working in your body. However, it’s important that you keep taking CellCept even if you don’t notice that it’s working. You should take it for as long as your doctor decides it’s safe and effective for you.

How long does CellCept stay in your system?

CellCept will stay in your system for about 1 week after your last dose. To keep steady levels of the drug in your system, it’s important that you keep taking CellCept as your doctor prescribes.

It likely isn’t safe to take CellCept during pregnancy. When used during pregnancy, CellCept may cause birth defects and miscarriage (loss of pregnancy). The risk of miscarriage is highest during the first 3 months of pregnancy.

CellCept has a boxed warning for the risk of birth defects and miscarriage during pregnancy. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA.

It isn’t known how often miscarriage or birth defects may have happened in clinical studies of CellCept. However, data from pregnancy registries shows that 45% to 49% of people who took CellCept while pregnant had a miscarriage in the first 3 months of their pregnancy.

In addition, 23% to 27% of women who took part in pregnancy registries reported birth defects after taking CellCept. Birth defects that were reported include facial defects, heart defects, and defects affecting the arms and legs.

It’s important to note that pregnancy registry data is self-reported, meaning the results are submitted by people taking the drug. Therefore, this information was not gathered in a clinical study overseen by researchers. (See the section right below to learn more about pregnancy registries.)

Tell your doctor right away if you become pregnant while using CellCept. They can discuss with you the risks and benefits of continuing your CellCept treatment. They may also recommend a different treatment option for you during pregnancy.

Pregnancy registry

If you become pregnant while taking CellCept, you can take part in the Mycophenolate Pregnancy Registry. (Mycophenolate is the active drug in CellCept).

A pregnancy registry helps gather information on how certain drugs can affect pregnancy. To learn more, call 800-617-8191, visit the registry website, or talk with your doctor.

It may not be safe to take CellCept during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using CellCept.

For more information about taking CellCept during pregnancy, see the “CellCept and pregnancy” section above.

CellCept can also make certain forms of birth control less effective. This is especially true for birth control pills that contain the active drug levonorgestrel. Examples of birth control pills that contain levonorgestrel include Seasonique and Twirla.

If you take birth control pills, talk with your doctor before using CellCept. Your doctor can determine if you’re taking a birth control pill that contains levonorgestrel.

For women using CellCept

Women using CellCept should use effective birth control methods while taking the drug and for at least 6 weeks after their last dose.

Examples of effective birth control include:

For men using CellCept

Men who use CellCept should use effective birth control methods while taking the drug and for at least 90 days after their last dose.

It isn’t known if CellCept can pass into breast milk during breastfeeding. This drug hasn’t been studied in breastfeeding mothers.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed while using CellCept, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits.

CellCept is an immunosuppressant (a drug that weakens your immune system). Specifically, CellCept is a type of immunosuppressant called an antirejection drug. These drugs make your body less likely to reject a transplanted organ. CellCept is used with other antirejection drugs to help prevent organ rejection* in adults and in children ages 3 months and older.

Examples of immunosuppressants used with CellCept include corticosteroids and cyclosporine (Neoral, Sandimmune). (Cyclosporine is also an antirejection drug.)

If you have questions about using CellCept with other medications, talk with your doctor.

* Organ rejection occurs when the immune system attacks a transplanted organ.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warnings. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

  • Pregnancy. When used during pregnancy, CellCept may cause birth defects and miscarriage (loss of pregnancy). The risk of miscarriage is highest during the first 3 months of pregnancy.
  • Serious infections. Taking CellCept can raise your risk for a serious bacterial, viral, or fungal infections. In rare cases, serious infections that happen while taking CellCept can lead to a hospital stay or death.
  • Cancers. Taking CellCept may increase your risk for certain types of cancers, including lymphoma and skin cancer. (Lymphoma is a type of cancer that starts in your white blood cells.)

Other precautions

Before taking CellCept, talk with your doctor about your health history. CellCept may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Blood donation. You shouldn’t donate blood while using CellCept. And you should wait until at least 6 weeks after you’ve stopped using the drug to donate blood. Talk with your doctor if you have questions about blood donation while using CellCept.
  • Semen donation. Men taking CellCept shouldn’t donate semen while taking CellCept. They also shouldn’t donate semen for at least 90 days after stopping the drug. If you have questions about semen donation while taking CellCept, talk with your doctor.
  • HGPRT enzyme deficiency. Tell your doctor if you have a deficiency (low activity) of a certain enzyme called hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyl-transferase (HGPRT). Taking CellCept while you have this enzyme deficiency can cause increased levels of uric acid in the body. High levels of uric acid may cause a gout flare or kidney problems. Talk with your doctor about all of your medical conditions before starting treatment with CellCept. They may recommend that you take a different treatment for your condition.
  • Phenylketonuria (PKU). PKU is a condition that affects how the body breaks down a substance called phenylalanine. The liquid form of CellCept that you swallow contains aspartame (an artificial sweetener), and aspartame contains phenylalanine. Therefore, taking liquid CellCept that you swallow when you have PKU can cause even higher levels of phenylalanine in your body. Talk with your doctor about your risks of using liquid CellCept if you have PKU. They may recommend the CellCept capsules, tablets, or infusion for you instead.
  • Stomach problems. Stomach problems may happen after taking CellCept. These problems may include bleeding, ulcers (sores in the lining of the stomach), or perforation (a hole in the stomach wall). If you have a history of these conditions, you have an even higher chance of stomach problems after taking CellCept. Before taking CellCept, talk with your doctor about any stomach problems you currently have or have had in the past. Your doctor may recommend a different treatment for you or monitor your condition more closely.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to CellCept or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take CellCept. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It may not be safe to use CellCept during pregnancy. For more information, see the “CellCept and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if CellCept passes into the breast milk while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “CellCept and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of CellCept, see the “CellCept side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of CellCept can lead to serious side effects.

Do not use more CellCept than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get CellCept from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

How and where you store CellCept is slightly different for each form of the drug:

  • Tablets should be stored at room temperature (77°F/25°C) in a tightly sealed container away from light. It’s best to store the tablets in the original container from the manufacturer. You may temporarily store the tablets at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C), such as when traveling. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.
  • Capsules should be stored at room temperature. They may be temporarily stored at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C), such as when traveling.
  • The liquid should be stored at room temperature. However, you may store the liquid at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) for up to 60 days. You can also refrigerate the liquid at temperatures of 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C).
  • Your healthcare provider will store the powder and intravenous solution.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. Also, right after your healthcare provider has used a syringe, needle, or autoinjector, they’ll dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

CellCept is indicated for use in combination with other immunosuppressants to help prevent organ rejection in adults who’ve had a heart, liver, or kidney transplant. It’s also indicated to help prevent organ rejection in children ages 3 months and older who’ve had a kidney transplant.

Administration

CellCept contains the active ingredient mycophenolate mofetil. It’s available in the following forms and strengths:

  • capsules containing 250 milligrams (mg)
  • tablets containing 500 mg
  • oral suspension containing 200 mg per milliliter (mL) of suspension
  • intravenous infusion containing 500 mg per vial of solution

The first oral dose of CellCept should be given as soon as possible after a kidney, heart, or liver transplant. CellCept is typically taken twice daily. People taking CellCept should avoid eating at least 1 hour before and 2 hours after taking a dose.

It’s important to note that the oral dosage forms are not interchangeable with mycophenolic acid delayed-release tablets.

The IV infusion should be given within 24 hours of a transplant. CellCept IV infusion should be given over at least 2 hours twice daily.

Note: The IV infusion is used for people who cannot swallow CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid. In this instance, the CellCept infusion can be administered for up to 14 days. However, as soon as CellCept capsules, tablets, or liquid can be swallowed, discontinue the infusion form.

Mechanism of action

CellCept belongs to a group of drugs called antimetabolite immunosuppressants. It works by inhibiting the inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase enzyme, preventing B-cell and T-cell lymphocytes from multiplying.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

CellCept is rapidly absorbed and converted to its active metabolite, mycophenolic acid. Its time to maximum concentration, maximum concentration, and total exposure are variable with dosing, transplant types, renal function, and kidney function. Administration with food decreases the concentration of mycophenolic acid by 40%. CellCept is primarily metabolized by glucuronidation and is excreted into the urine.

Contraindications

CellCept is contraindicated in people with a known allergy to any of its ingredients. The injectable formulation is also contraindicated in people who have an allergy to Polysorbate 80 (TWEEN).

Storage

Storage requirements for CellCept vary with each formulation:

  • Tablets: Store the tablets at room temperature (77°F/25°C). Excursions are allowed at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C). Tablets should be protected from light and should be stored in the original manufacturer’s container.
  • Capsules: Store the capsules at room temperature. Excursions are allowed at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C).
  • Oral suspension: Store the dry powder and the reconstituted oral suspension at room temperature. Excursions for both the dry powder and reconstituted suspension are at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) for up to 60 days. The reconstituted suspension can also be stored at refrigerated temperatures of 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C).
  • Intravenous solution: Both the dry powder and reconstituted intravenous solution should be stored at room temperature. Temporary excursions are allowed at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C).

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.