Aptiom is a brand-name prescription medication that’s FDA-approved to treat partial-onset seizures (also called focal seizures). These seizures can occur if part of the brain has unusual electrical activity.

Aptiom is used in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

Drug details

Aptiom comes as a tablet that you take by mouth. It is available in four strengths: 200 milligrams (mg), 400 mg, 600 mg, and 800 mg. Aptiom can be taken on its own or with other medications to treat partial-onset seizures.

Aptiom is in a classification (group) of drugs called anticonvulsants. These medications work to help prevent seizures.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Aptiom, see the “Aptiom uses” section below.

Aptiom is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

If you’re interested in using the generic form of Aptiom, talk with your doctor. They can tell you if it comes in forms and strengths that can be used for your condition.

Aptiom can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Aptiom, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Aptiom, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Aptiom can include:

  • sleepiness
  • nausea or vomiting
  • headache
  • tremor
  • mild neurological side effects, such as:
    • dizziness
    • vertigo (feeling that your surroundings are spinning or moving when they’re not)

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Aptiom. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Aptiom’s medication guide.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Aptiom aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Serious neurological side effects. Symptoms can include:
    • trouble walking or with balance
    • memory loss
    • trouble speaking
    • confusion or slowed thinking
  • Liver problems. Symptoms can include:
    • jaundice (yellowing of the skin or the whites of your eyes)
    • nausea or vomiting
    • abdominal (belly) pain
  • Changes in blood cell levels, such as decreased white blood cells. Symptoms can include:
    • getting infections more often
    • fever
    • weakness
  • Allergic reaction.*
  • Serious skin rash or organ reactions, such as DRESS.*
  • Hyponatremia (low sodium levels).*
  • Suicidal thoughts or behaviors.*

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here are some details on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Serious skin rash or organ reactions

In rare cases, it’s possible that taking Aptiom can cause a serious skin rash or reactions that affect your organs. If these conditions do occur, they can be very severe and even life threatening. Because of this, it’s important to know which symptoms to watch out for. Examples of serious skin rashes that can occur include:

To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Symptoms of SJS or TEN may include:

  • painful rash that may appear red, purple, darkened, or discolored
  • peeling skin
  • fever
  • blistering

Aptiom can also cause a condition called drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). Along with a rash, DRESS can cause the following symptoms:

  • liver problems, such as hepatitis
  • kidney inflammation (swelling and damage)
  • swelling of your heart
  • inflammation of your muscles

If you develop any symptoms of a skin rash while taking Aptiom, tell your doctor right away. They can help determine what’s causing the rash, how severe it is, and if it may be from Aptiom.

If you develop any skin rashes, such as SJS or TEN, or skin and organ reactions, such as DRESS, your doctor will have you stop taking Aptiom. They can prescribe treatment for your rash, so it doesn’t get worse. They’ll also have you switch to a different medication to treat your seizure condition.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors

All antiepileptic medications (drugs that treat seizure disorders), including Aptiom, may raise your risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Throughout your treatment with Aptiom, your doctor will monitor you for symptoms of suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

This side effect is rare, but it can be very serious. To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

If you or those around you notice any changes in your behavior, be sure to tell your doctor. These changes may include:

If you’ve experienced depression or suicidal thoughts or behaviors in the past, tell your doctor before taking Aptiom. They may monitor you more closely during treatment, or they may recommend a different medication to treat your condition.

If you notice any changes in your behavior or mood, or if you have suicidal thoughts or behaviors, tell your doctor or go to the emergency room right away.

Hyponatremia

Some people may experience hyponatremia (low sodium levels) from taking Aptiom. Although this side effect is rare, it can become serious. To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Symptoms of low sodium levels may include:

  • nausea or vomiting
  • feeling tired
  • headache
  • confusion
  • muscle spasms or muscle weakness
  • more severe seizures or seizures occurring more often than usual

Your risk of hyponatremia may be increased if you also take other medications that can decrease your sodium levels. Your doctor may check your blood levels throughout your treatment with Aptiom to make sure your sodium levels aren’t too low. If you experience any symptoms of hyponatremia, talk with your doctor right away.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Aptiom. You should not take Aptiom if you have had an allergic reaction to another medication, called oxcarbazepine (Trileptal).

Although rare, it’s possible that Aptiom may cause serious or life threatening allergic reactions. Examples include anaphylaxis (severe allergic reaction) or angioedema (swelling of your face, eyes, or mouth), both of which can cause trouble breathing. It’s important to be aware of the symptoms of an allergic reaction so you can get treatment as soon as possible if one occurs.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Aptiom, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Aptiom dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the severity of the condition you’re using Aptiom to treat
  • your age
  • in children, body weight
  • other medical conditions you may have
  • other medications you’re taking

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Aptiom comes as a tablet that you take by mouth. It’s available in four strengths: 200 milligrams (mg), 400 mg, 600 mg, and 800 mg.

Dosage for partial onset seizures

The usual starting dosage for adults with partial-onset seizures is 400 mg taken once daily. Then your doctor will increase your daily dose by 400 mg to 600 mg each week, based on how the medication is working for you. The recommended maintenance dosage of Aptiom is 800 mg to 1,600 mg taken once daily.

In some cases, if you have a high risk of seizures, your doctor may have you start with a dosage of 800 mg taken once daily.

However, it’s important that you always follow your doctor’s recommendation for your Aptiom dosage. In some cases, if you’re taking other seizure medications along with Aptiom, your dose may need to be increased or decreased. Examples of some of these medications may include carbamazepine (Tegretol) and phenytoin (Dilantin).

You should not stop taking Aptiom without first talking with your doctor. Stopping this medication suddenly increases your risk of seizures and status epilepticus (seizures that last longer than 5 minutes). If you need to stop taking Aptiom, your doctor will likely recommend that you slowly decrease your dose over time, so that your body can adjust to the change.

Children’s dosage

Aptiom is approved for use in children ages 4 years and older. Dosing in children is based on their body weight. Your child’s doctor will begin treatment by giving your child a starting dose. After that, they may increase the dose about once per week until their seizures are well managed. The amount by which they increase the dose depends on your child’s body weight and the dose your child currently takes.

Below is a table that shows the starting dosage and maintenance (daily) dosage for each weight range.

Body weightStarting dose (mg/day)Maintenance dose (mg/day)
11 to 21 kg (about 24 to 46 lb)200 mg400 to 600 mg
22 to 31 kg (about 48 to 68 lb)300 mg500 to 800 mg
32 to 38 kg (about 70 to 83 lb)300 mg600 to 900 mg
More than 38 kg (about 83 lb)400 mg800 to 1,200 mg

For example, if your child weighs 15 kilograms (kg), which is about 33 pounds (lb), they’ll likely start by taking a dose of 200 mg per day. Then, your child’s doctor may increase their dose by 200 mg per day every week until they reach a maintenance dose that works well for them. In this case, the recommended maintenance dose would be between 400 mg and 600 mg per day.

However, it’s important that you always follow the doctor’s recommendation for your child’s dose of Aptiom. In some cases, if they’re taking other seizure medications along with Aptiom, their dose may need to be increased or decreased. Examples of some of these other medications include carbamazepine (Tegretol) and phenytoin (Dilantin).

There are also other circumstances where your child’s dose may need to be adjusted, including if your child has any kidney problems. Talk with their doctor about the best starting dose and treatment plan for your child, based on their medical conditions and other medications.

If your child needs to stop taking Aptiom for any reason, be sure to talk with their doctor first. Stopping this medication suddenly increases their risk of seizures and may cause status epilepticus (seizures that last longer than 5 minutes). If your child needs to stop taking Aptiom, their doctor will likely recommend their dose be decreased slowly over time, so that their body can adjust to the change.

What if I miss a dose?

Before you start taking Aptiom, talk with your doctor or pharmacist about what to do if you miss a dose. In many cases, it may be best to take your dose as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next dose, you may be advised to skip the missed dose and take your next scheduled dose at its regular time.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Aptiom is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Aptiom is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Aptiom.

How long does Aptiom stay in your system?

Aptiom can stay in your system for days after you take a dose. The half-life of Aptiom (the amount of time it takes your body to remove half a dose of the drug from your system) is 13 to 20 hours.

In most cases, it takes four to five half-lives for a drug to be cleared from your body. So Aptiom can stay in your system for 52 to 100 hours (about 2 to 4 days).

If you need to stop taking Aptiom for any reason, talk with your doctor first. They’ll likely recommend that you slowly decrease your dose of Aptiom. Stopping Aptiom suddenly can increase your risk of seizures and status epilepticus (seizures that last longer than 5 minutes).

Does Aptiom cause weight gain or weight loss?

No, weight gain or weight loss shouldn’t occur from taking Aptiom. In clinical studies, changes in weight weren’t reported as side effects by people taking the drug.

However, other seizure medications may cause changes in weight. In some cases, you may take other drugs along with Aptiom to treat your condition. It’s possible that other seizure medications may cause weight gain or weight loss.

If you experience unexpected weight changes that concern you while taking Aptiom, talk with your doctor. They may be able to help determine what’s causing the weight change.

Is Aptiom used for migraine, nerve pain, or trigeminal neuralgia?

At this time, Aptiom is only approved to treat partial-onset seizures. But in some cases, the drug may be used off-label for other conditions. (Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.)

Aptiom may be used off-label to treat migraine, nerve pain, or trigeminal neuralgia (a type of nerve pain affecting your face and jaw). If you have any of these conditions, your doctor will determine if Aptiom can be used off-label to treat them. Aptiom may be used more often in adults with these conditions, but in some cases, it may be recommended for use in a child.

If you’re interested in using Aptiom for migraine, nerve pain, or trigeminal neuralgia, talk with your doctor. They can help determine the best treatment option for your condition.

Is hair loss a side effect of Aptiom?

No, Aptiom shouldn’t cause hair loss. This was not a side effect reported by people taking Aptiom in clinical studies.

In some cases, Aptiom may be used along with other medications to treat your condition. Sometimes, other seizure medications, such as lamotrigine (Lamictal), may cause hair loss.

If you experience hair loss that bothers you while taking Aptiom, talk with your doctor. They can help determine what’s causing the hair loss and the best way to treat it.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Aptiom, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Alternatives for partial onset seizures

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat partial-onset seizures include:

  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • levetiracetam (Keppra)
  • topiramate (Topamax)
  • lamotrigine (Lamictal)
  • lacosamide (Vimpat)
  • oxcarbazepine (Trileptal)
  • carbamazepine (Tegretol)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Aptiom to treat certain conditions. Aptiom may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than its FDA-approved use.

Aptiom for partial-onset seizures

Aptiom treats epilepsy. Specifically, Aptiom is used in people with partial-onset seizures (also called focal seizures). These seizures can occur if part of the brain has unusual electrical activity.

Symptoms of a partial-onset seizure may include:

In some cases, the cause of partial-onset seizures may be unknown. But some people may have triggers that increase their risk of having a seizure. These triggers can vary from person to person, but examples may include lack of sleep, flashing lights, stress, or using alcohol or drugs.

Effectiveness for partial onset seizures

Aptiom is an effective medication for treating partial-onset seizures. In fact, the American Academy of Neurology’s epilepsy treatment guidelines recommends Aptiom as a treatment option for seizures.

Aptiom and children

Aptiom is approved for use in children ages 4 years and older with partial onset seizures. In clinical studies, Aptiom was shown to be an effective treatment option for children in this age group.

Aptiom is also recommended as a treatment option for children with seizures in the American Academy of Neurology’s epilepsy treatment guidelines.

If you have questions about using Aptiom to treat your child’s seizures, talk with their doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Aptiom can vary. To find current prices for Aptiom tablets in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Aptiom. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Aptiom, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Aptiom, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Aptiom, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Sunovion, the manufacturer of Aptiom, offers three ways to save: a high-deductible discount card, a savings card, and a trial voucher. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-427-8466 or visit the manufacturer’s website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Aptiom may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Aptiom, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Aptiom is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Aptiom is approved to treat partial-onset seizures in adults and in children ages 4 years and older. These seizures can occur if part of the brain has unusual electrical activity.

Aptiom’s mechanism of action (the way the drug works) isn’t fully known. However, it’s believed that the drug blocks sodium channels to help prevent seizures.

How long does it take to work?

Aptiom begins working quickly after you take your dose of medication. In fact, you have the most drug in your body about 1 to 4 hours after your dose.

However, it may take 4 to 5 days of taking Aptiom until the drug is at a consistent amount in your body. So it’s important to continue taking your dose of Aptiom every day so that the medication will work for you.

It’s possible that Aptiom may cause drug dependence. This can occur when your body gets used to having the drug, and it has trouble functioning without it. Drug dependence can occur if you feel that you need the drug to go through your everyday life.

You may also experience withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking Aptiom suddenly. Withdrawal symptoms are side effects that can happen when you stop taking a drug that your body has become dependent on.

With seizure medications such as Aptiom, withdrawal symptoms can be very serious. Your body is used to having a medication to prevent seizures. When your body is no longer receiving the drug, you have a higher risk of seizures. This may include experiencing status epilepticus (seizures that last longer than 5 minutes). So it’s important that you don’t suddenly stop taking Aptiom.

If you’re interested in stopping your Aptiom treatment, be sure to discuss it with your doctor first. They’ll likely recommend slowly decreasing your dose of Aptiom over time so that your body can adjust to not having the medication.

There’s no known direct interaction between taking Aptiom and drinking alcohol.

Both Aptiom and alcohol may cause you to experience side effects, such as dizziness, headache, or double vision. Drinking alcohol while taking Aptiom increases your risk for these side effects. In addition, both alcohol and Aptiom can raise your risk of liver problems.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much (if any) may be safe for you to drink while taking Aptiom.

It’s not known if Aptiom is safe to take during pregnancy. There haven’t been enough human studies done to determine if there’s a risk to the fetus if taken during pregnancy.

Animal studies have shown that Aptiom can increase the risk of developmental problems in a fetus (also known as birth defects). However, animal studies don’t always predict what may happen in humans.

If you do become pregnant while taking Aptiom, consider signing up for the pregnancy registry. A pregnancy registry is a collection of data from people who’ve taken certain medications while pregnant. This information helps determine if the medication may be safe to take during pregnancy. You can sign up for the North American Antiepileptic Drug Pregnancy Registry online or by calling 888-233-2334.

If you become pregnant while taking Aptiom, talk with your doctor right away. They can help determine the best treatment plan for you.

Aptiom and fertility

It’s possible that Aptiom may affect fertility (the ability to conceive a child). No human studies have looked at whether fertility may be affected by the drug.

In animal studies, embryos had trouble developing, and fertility was decreased. But animal studies don’t always predict what may happen in humans.

If you’re planning to conceive, talk with your doctor about Aptiom and fertility. They may recommend a different medication for you.

It’s unknown whether Aptiom is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Aptiom.

For more information about taking Aptiom during pregnancy, see the “Aptiom and pregnancy” section above.

For females using Aptiom

Aptiom can interact with certain types of hormonal birth control, which may make them less effective.

Specifically, birth control containing ethinylestradiol and levonorgestrel are affected by Aptiom. These contraceptives should be avoided by females* taking Aptiom.

If you want to prevent pregnancy, you should use a form of contraception other than hormonal birth control while taking Aptiom. You should continue using the other form of birth control for at least one menstrual cycle after you end your Aptiom treatment.

Instead, you can use a barrier contraceptive, such as a condom, or an intrauterine device.

Talk with your doctor about the best form of contraception for you during your Aptiom treatment.

For males using Aptiom

The manufacturer hasn’t given any birth control recommendations for males* taking Aptiom. If you’re a male taking Avastin and you’re sexually active with a partner who can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs during treatment.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “female” and “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

It’s not known if Aptiom is safe to use while breastfeeding. The drug passes into breast milk, but it’s not known what effects Aptiom may have on a breastfed child or on breast milk production.

If you’re currently breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before taking Aptiom.

Aptiom can interact with several other medications. It is not known to interact with supplements or foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Aptiom and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Aptiom. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Aptiom.

Before taking Aptiom, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Types of drugs that may interact with Aptiom include:

  • Other antiepileptic drugs (AEDs). Taking other AEDs with Aptiom may make Aptiom less effective. Your doctor may need to increase your dose of Aptiom if you’re also taking other AEDs. Examples of AEDs include:
    • phenobarbital
    • carbamazepine (Tegretol)
    • phenytoin (Dilantin)
    • primidone (Mysoline)
  • Drugs broken down by CYP2C19 (a protein in your body that breaks down substances). Aptiom may increase your risk for side effects from these other drugs. Your doctor may need to decrease your dose of your other medication if you take these drugs with Aptiom. Examples of drugs broken down by CYP2C19 include:
    • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • Drugs broken down by CYP3A4 (a protein in your body that breaks down substances). Aptiom may cause these medications to be less effective. If you take these drugs with Aptiom, your doctor may monitor you closely during treatment and may need to increase your dose of these other medications. Examples of drugs broken down by CYP3A4 include:
    • simvastatin (Zocor)
    • lovastatin (Altoprev)
  • Certain birth control pills. Aptiom may cause some birth control pills to be less effective. Your doctor may recommend a different form of birth control while you’re taking Aptiom. Examples of birth control pills that can interact with Aptiom include:
    • ethinylestradiol/norethindrone (Junel, Loestrin, Microgestin)
    • drospirenone/ethinylestradiol (Loryna, Ocella, Yaz)
    • levonorgestrel/ethinylestradiol (Seasonique, Falmina, Lessina)

Aptiom and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Aptiom. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Aptiom.

Aptiom and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Aptiom. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Aptiom, talk with your doctor.

You should take Aptiom according to the instructions your doctor or other healthcare professional gives you.

Aptiom is available as a tablet that you take by mouth once daily.

When to take

You should take your Aptiom dose once daily. If possible, try to take your dose around the same time each day. This helps make sure there’s always a consistent amount of drug in your body.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Aptiom with food

You can take your dose of Aptiom with or without food.

Can Aptiom be crushed, split, or chewed?

Aptiom tablets can be swallowed whole or may be crushed, if needed.

Before taking Aptiom, talk with your doctor about your health history. Aptiom may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Depression, mood problems, or suicidal thoughts or actions. Aptiom may increase your risk of depression, mood problems, or suicidal thoughts or behaviors. If you’ve experienced any of these before, tell your doctor before taking Aptiom. You may have a higher risk for these side effects while taking Aptiom if you’ve experienced them before. If you take Aptiom, your doctor may monitor you more closely during treatment. Or they may recommend a different treatment option for you.
  • Liver problems. If you have any liver conditions, tell your doctor before taking Aptiom. This drug may raise your risk of liver problems, or it may make existing liver problems worse. Your doctor may monitor your liver more closely during your treatment with Aptiom, or they may recommend a different treatment option for you.
  • Kidney problems. If you have kidney problems, tell your doctor before starting Aptiom treatment. Aptiom is removed from your body by your kidneys. If your kidneys aren’t working properly, they may not remove the drug as quickly as they should. This can raise your risk for side effects. If you have kidney problems, your doctor may give you a lower dose of Aptiom to prevent this from happening.
  • Blood problems. Before taking Aptiom, tell your doctor about any blood problems you have, such as anemia. Aptiom may cause a decrease in your blood cell levels. If you already have low levels or other conditions affecting your blood, Aptiom may make your condition worse. Your doctor will likely monitor your blood levels throughout your treatment, and they may recommend a different medication for you.
  • Past serious skin rash or organ reaction. Aptiom can cause a serious skin rash or an organ reaction, such as drug reaction with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms (DRESS). If you’ve experienced these side effects with other drugs, such as oxcarbazepine (Trileptal) or carbamazepine (Tegretol), talk with your doctor before taking Aptiom. Your doctor will recommend a different medication for your condition.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Aptiom or any of its ingredients, including oxcarbazepine (Trileptal), you should not take Aptiom. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Aptiom is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Aptiom and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s unknown if Aptiom is safe to take while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Aptiom and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Aptiom, see the “Aptiom side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Aptiom can lead to serious side effects.

Do not use more Aptiom than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

  • dizziness
  • nausea or vomiting
  • feeling tired
  • trouble walking
  • double vision
  • tingling or sensation in your mouth
  • involuntary movements
  • low sodium levels, which can cause seizures

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Aptiom from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Aptiom tablets should be stored at room temperature, 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). If necessary, it can be stored for a short time at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C).

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Aptiom and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

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