Blenrep is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to treat multiple myeloma in adults in certain situations. Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer that affects plasma cells (a type of white blood cell).

For this purpose, the multiple myeloma must be either relapsed or refractory. “Relapsed” means that the cancer came back. “Refractory” refers to cancer that didn’t get better after using certain treatments in the past. Another condition must also be met to use Blenrep. For more information, see the “Blenrep uses” section below.

Drug details

Blenrep contains the active ingredient belantamab mafodotin-blmf. It’s a type of drug called an antibody-drug conjugate. Blenrep works by targeting myeloma cells and causing them to die. For more information, see the “How Blenrep works” section below.

Blenrep comes as a powder that’s mixed with sterile water to form a liquid solution. The drug is given by a healthcare provider as an intravenous (IV) infusion. This is an injection into a vein over a period of time.

You’ll likely receive Blenrep infusions once every 3 weeks. The drug is available in one strength: 100 milligrams (mg).

FDA approval

In 2020, Blenrep was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It’s important to note that the drug received accelerated approval from the FDA.

Receiving accelerated approval means that Blenrep was made available to the public before all its clinical studies were finished. This is sometimes allowed for drugs used to treat conditions without many treatment options, such as multiple myeloma. The FDA’s decision for full approval of Blenrep will be made after additional clinical trials have been completed.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Blenrep, see the “Blenrep uses” section below.

Blenrep contains the active drug belantamab mafodotin-blmf. It’s a biologic drug that’s available only as a brand-name medication. Blenrep isn’t currently available in a biosimilar form.

A biologic drug is made from living cells, while other drugs are made from chemicals. Drugs made from chemicals can have generics, which are exact copies of the active drug in the brand-name medication. Biologics, on the other hand, can’t be copied exactly. So, instead of a generic, biologics have biosimilars. Biosimilars are “similar” to the parent drug, and they’re considered to be just as effective and safe.

Like generics, biosimilars are often less expensive than brand-name medications.

As with all medications, the cost of Blenrep can vary. To find current prices for Blenrep in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan and your location. It’ll also depend on the cost of the visits to the facility where you receive your doses of Blenrep.

Before approving coverage for Blenrep, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Blenrep, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Blenrep, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help may be available.

GlaxoSmithKline, the manufacturer of Blenrep, offers a program called Together with GSK Oncology. This program offers a variety of financial aid options and other support. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for assistance, call 844-4GSK-ONC (844-447-5662). Or, you can ask your doctor to help fill out this enrollment form.

Generic or biosimilar version

Blenrep contains the active drug belantamab mafodotin-blmf. It’s a biologic drug that’s available only as a brand-name medication. Blenrep isn’t currently available in a biosimilar form.

A biologic drug is made from living cells, while other drugs are made from chemicals. Drugs made from chemicals can have generics, which are exact copies of the active drug in the brand-name medication. Biologics, on the other hand, can’t be copied exactly. So, instead of a generic, biologics have biosimilars. Biosimilars are “similar” to the parent drug, and they’re considered to be just as effective and safe.

Like generics, biosimilars are often less expensive than brand-name medications.

Blenrep can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Blenrep. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Blenrep, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Blenrep, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Blenrep can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Blenrep. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Blenrep’s medication guide.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Blenrep aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
Blenrep has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Blenrep. It isn’t known how often this side effect may have occurred with Blenrep in clinical studies.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Blenrep, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Eye problems

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the FDA. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Taking Blenrep may cause changes to your cornea (the outer layer of your eye). This can lead to serious eye problems, including corneal ulcers (open sores on the cornea) and loss of vision. The changes can also cause dry eyes or blurry vision. You’ll be required by the Blenrep Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program to have your vision checked by a doctor before you start taking Blenrep and before you receive each dose. They’ll also check to see if you develop symptoms of any eye problems.

If you do have eye problems while taking Blenrep, your doctor may lower your dosage. Or, they may prescribe a different drug for your condition.

REMS program

Because of the risk of eye problems, you’ll need to enroll in the Blenrep REMS program. Your healthcare provider can help you complete the enrollment form and learn about the requirements.

The FDA creates REMS programs to help ensure that certain medications are used safely and are given by healthcare providers with special training.

The Blenrep REMS program helps you and your doctor manage the risk of eye problems with the drug. You can receive Blenrep only if you’re enrolled in the Blenrep REMS program and continue to receive regular eye exams according to the program. Your doctor must also be enrolled in the program and receive training on how to use the medication. In addition, the drug must be given in a facility that’s been certified by REMS.

Eye symptoms associated with Blenrep

Eye problems occurred in 77% of people who used Blenrep in clinical studies. In these studies, Blenrep wasn’t compared with other treatments. So, it isn’t known how many people taking other treatments may have had eye problems.

Below is a list of eye symptoms and how often people using Blenrep reported having them:

  • damage to the cornea:* 76%
  • changes in the sharpness of vision: 55%
  • blurry vision: 27%
  • dry eye: 19%

* For most people who experienced damage to the cornea, the side effect occurred while receiving the first two doses of Blenrep. For half of the people who experienced it, the damage healed within 2 months.

Blenrep and eye irritation

Because Blenrep may cause eye irritation, your doctor may recommend using certain eye drops to help reduce this side effect. For more information, see the “Blenrep use with other drugs” section below.

Keep in mind that you shouldn’t wear contact lenses while you’re using Blenrep. This should help reduce eye irritation as well.

In addition, eye problems due to Blenrep may make it hard to read or drive. For this reason, you should avoid operating heavy machinery if you experience any eye problems while using this drug.

What your doctor will do

Your doctor will check your vision before you start Blenrep treatment and before you receive each dose of the drug. If you experience any blurry vision or dry eyes while using the drug, tell your doctor right away. They may lower your dose or prescribe a different drug for your condition.

A low platelet level

Blenrep may cause a low platelet level in the blood. Platelets are blood cells that help your blood clot.

In clinical studies, a low platelet level occurred in 69% of people who used Blenrep. Half of the people who had this side effect had it occur within 26.5 days of their first dose. In these studies, Blenrep wasn’t compared with other treatments. So, it isn’t known how many people taking other treatments may have had a low platelet level.

Of the people who experienced this side effect while taking Blenrep:

  • 9% had a platelet level that required them to have their dose lowered
  • 2.8% had a platelet level that required their dose to be skipped or delayed
  • 0.5% had a platelet level that required the doctor to stop treating their condition with the drug

Symptoms of a low platelet level may include bruising or bleeding more easily than usual. In rare cases, bleeding may be fatal. In the clinical studies of Blenrep, two people who used the drug died after experiencing a brain bleed.

If you have these symptoms while taking Blenrep, talk with your doctor. They can help determine whether or not the drug is the cause.

Your doctor will typically test your platelet level before treatment and during treatment. If you develop a low platelet level, they may lower your dose of Blenrep or recommend a different treatment option for you.

Infusion-related reactions

Blenrep is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion, which is an injection into a vein over a period of time. It’s possible to have infusion-related reactions to Blenrep. These are side effects that may occur during or soon after a Blenrep infusion.

In clinical studies of Blenrep, 18% of people who were given the drug had infusion-related reactions. Severe infusion-related reactions occurred in 1.8% of people using Blenrep. In these studies, Blenrep wasn’t compared with other treatments. So, it isn’t known how many people taking other treatments may have had infusion-related reactions.

Symptoms of infusion-related reactions may include:

  • chills
  • coughing or wheezing
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)
  • rash or itching
  • shaking
  • shortness of breath
  • swelling of the tongue, mouth, or throat

A healthcare provider will monitor you during your Blenrep infusion and shortly after. If you develop the symptoms mentioned above while receiving an infusion, the healthcare provider will typically pause the infusion and treat your symptoms. Then, if they think it’s safe to do so, they might restart the Blenrep infusion at a slower rate.

Blenrep is approved to treat a type of blood cancer called multiple myeloma. This condition affects plasma cells, which are a type of white blood cell that helps your immune system fight infection.

With multiple myeloma, your body makes a large amount of abnormal plasma cells, known as multiple myeloma cells. These abnormal plasma cells can overcrowd your bone marrow. This can lead to lower levels of other cells, such as white blood cells, red blood cells, and platelets. Multiple myeloma can also increase your risk for developing an infection. For more information about this condition, see the “Blenrep uses” section below.

What does Blenrep do?

Blenrep contains the active ingredient belantamab mafodotin-blmf. It’s a type of drug called an antibody-drug conjugate. This means that it contains an active drug that’s connected to an antibody (a type of protein used by your immune system).

Blenrep works by targeting the myeloma cells in your blood. It does this by attaching to cells and causing them to die.

One part of Blenrep attaches to a protein found on myeloma cells. The protein is called B cell maturation antigen. After this, a different part of Blenrep enters the myeloma cell and destroys it.

The way the drug works to cause an effect in your body is called its “mechanism of action.”

How long does it take to work?

Blenrep starts working right after your first dose. But you probably won’t notice the drug working in your body. Your doctor will likely give you blood tests to see if Blenrep is effectively treating your multiple myeloma.

If you have questions about what to expect from Blenrep treatment, talk with your doctor.

The Blenrep dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • your body weight in kilograms (kg)
  • any side effects you may have while taking the drug

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. But be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Blenrep comes as a powder that’s mixed with sterile water to form a liquid solution. The drug is given by a healthcare provider as an intravenous (IV) infusion. This is an injection into a vein over a period of time. Infusions typically last for about 30 minutes.

Blenrep is available in one strength: 100 milligrams (mg).

Dosage for multiple myeloma

Blenrep is approved to treat multiple myeloma in adults in certain situations. For this use, Blenrep is given to adults whose multiple myeloma came back or didn’t get better after using at least four other treatments in the past.*

For this purpose, the multiple myeloma must be either relapsed or refractory. “Relapsed” means that the cancer came back. “Refractory” refers to cancer that didn’t get better after using certain treatments in the past. Another condition must also be met to use Blenrep. For more information, see the “Blenrep uses” section below.

The typical dosage of Blenrep is 2.5 mg per kilogram (mg/kg) of body weight every 3 weeks. For example, a 175-pound (lb) male weighs about 80 kg.† This means that their recommended Blenrep dose would be about 200 mg per infusion.

Your doctor may give you a different dosage depending on any side effects you have while taking Blenrep. If you have questions about the dosage that’s right for you, talk with your doctor.

* For more information about how Blenrep is used, see the “Blenrep uses” section below.
† One kg is equal to about 2.2 lb.

Dosage questions

Below are answers to some questions you may have about taking Blenrep

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss an appointment for a dose of Blenrep, call your doctor’s office as soon as possible to reschedule.

To help make sure that you don’t miss an infusion appointment, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Blenrep may be used as a long-term treatment as long as the drug is effective and you don’t have bothersome side effects. If you and your doctor determine that Blenrep is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Blenrep to treat certain conditions. Blenrep may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Blenrep for multiple myeloma

Blenrep is FDA-approved to treat multiple myeloma in adults in certain situations.

For this purpose, the multiple myeloma must be either relapsed or refractory. “Relapsed” means that the cancer came back. “Refractory” refers to cancer that didn’t get better after using certain treatments in the past. Another condition must also be met to use Blenrep.

Also, you must have received at least four other treatments for multiple myeloma, including an immunomodulator, an anti-CD38 monoclonal antibody, and a proteasome inhibitor. The list below gives some examples of these:

  • Immunomodulators. Examples include lenalidomide (Revlimid) and pomalidomide (Pomalyst).
  • Anti-CD38 monoclonal antibodies. Examples include daratumumab (Darzalex) and isatuximab (Sarclisa).
  • Proteasome inhibitors. Examples include bortezomib (Velcade) and carfilzomib (Kyprolis).

About multiple myeloma

Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer that affects plasma cells (a type of white blood cell). Plasma cells are found in your bone marrow, which is the spongy tissue inside your bones. The cells help your immune system fight infection.

With multiple myeloma, your body makes a large amount of abnormal plasma cells, known as multiple myeloma cells. These abnormal plasma cells can overcrowd your bone marrow. This can lead to lower levels of other important cells that are also in your bone marrow, such as red blood cells and platelets. Having a low platelet level can cause you to bruise or bleed more easily than usual.

Abnormal plasma cells aren’t able to fight infection. Multiple myeloma can also cause low levels of other white blood cells that help prevent infection. So, if you have multiple myeloma, you’re at very high risk for infection.

Symptoms of multiple myeloma

Some people who have multiple myeloma won’t have any symptoms of the condition. But if you do have symptoms, they can include:

The exact cause of multiple myeloma isn’t known. Your age, sex, and race may affect your risk.

Effectiveness for multiple myeloma

A clinical study has found Blenrep to be effective for treating multiple myeloma.

Researchers looked at Blenrep for treating multiple myeloma. For this purpose, the multiple myeloma must be either relapsed or refractory. “Relapsed” means that the cancer came back. “Refractory” refers to cancer that didn’t get better after using certain treatments in the past. Another condition must also be met to use Blenrep.

People were given Blenrep until their condition improved or until they couldn’t tolerate the drug’s side effects. Blenrep wasn’t compared with any other treatments in this study.

The researchers found the following:

  • The test results of people who took Blenrep showed that 31% had a response* in their multiple myeloma. A response can be a partial or a complete response. Of those who had a response, 73% of people had their multiple myeloma maintain the response for at least 6 months.
  • Half of the responders had tests that showed the response 1.4 months after starting treatment.

* In this situation, a response was how much a treatment changed the level of multiple myeloma cells. When the treatment decreased the level of multiple myeloma cells to an extent, that was called a partial response. When the treatment decreased the level of cells to a degree that they couldn’t be detected in tests, that was called a complete response.

Blenrep and children

Blenrep isn’t approved for use in children. It isn’t known if the drug is safe or effective for use in children.

Taking Blenrep can cause serious eye problems,* such as corneal ulcers and loss of vision. For this reason, it’s recommended that you use lubricating eye drops while taking Blenrep. Using lubricating eye drops may help prevent your eyes from becoming itchy and dry. The eye drops should also be preservative-free. It’s important to use preservative-free eye drops to decrease the amount of irritation to your eyes.

Examples of preservative-free lubricating eye drops include those that contain:

  • polyethylene glycol/propylene glycol, such as Systane Ultra
  • sodium carboxymethylcellulose, such as TheraTears

If you have questions about using eye drops with Blenrep, talk with your doctor.

Blenrep has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “Eye problems” in the “Blenrep side effects” section above.

There are no known interactions between Blenrep and alcohol.

But the American Cancer Society warns that the risks of drinking alcohol while taking cancer treatments, such as Blenrep, aren’t fully known.

If you drink alcohol, it’s important to talk with your doctor about the amount that’s safe for you to drink while taking Blenrep.

Blenrep isn’t known to interact with other medications, herbs, supplements, or foods. The manufacturer of Blenrep didn’t study drug interactions with Blenrep. But this doesn’t mean that drug interactions with Blenrep can’t happen.

Before taking Blenrep, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Blenrep and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Blenrep. But you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Blenrep.

Blenrep and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Blenrep. If you have any questions about eating certain foods while taking Blenrep, talk with your doctor.

Blenrep and vaccines

There aren’t any known interactions between Blenrep and vaccines.

But the American Cancer Society recommends that you avoid getting certain vaccines while receiving cancer treatments, such as Blenrep. This is because vaccines generally require a person to have a healthy immune system to be effective. Because cancer can weaken your immune system, getting vaccines during cancer treatment can make the vaccines less effective.

If you have questions about receiving specific vaccines while taking Blenrep, talk with your doctor.

Other drugs are available that can treat multiple myeloma.* Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Blenrep, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Other drugs may be used to treat multiple myeloma. For this purpose, the multiple myeloma must be either relapsed or refractory. “Relapsed” means that the cancer came back. “Refractory” refers to cancer that didn’t get better after using certain treatments in the past. Another condition must also be met to use Blenrep.

Examples of these drugs include:

For more information, see the “Blenrep uses” section above.

* Multiple myeloma is a type of blood cancer that affects plasma cells (a type of white blood cell).

You should use Blenrep according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Blenrep is given by a healthcare provider as an intravenous (IV) infusion. An IV infusion is an injection into a vein over a period of time. The drug is usually given in a doctor’s office or clinic.

Each infusion typically lasts for about 30 minutes.

When it’s given

Blenrep infusions are usually given once every 3 weeks.

To help make sure that you don’t miss an infusion appointment, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

It isn’t safe to use Blenrep during pregnancy. There haven’t been human or animal studies of the drug during pregnancy. But it’s known that Blenrep can cause harm to a fetus. This is based on the way the drug works in the body.

If you can become pregnant, you’ll likely be given a pregnancy test before you can start treatment with Blenrep. This is done to make sure that you aren’t pregnant before you start taking the drug.

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor. They can recommend medications other than Blenrep.

If you become pregnant while using Blenrep, talk with your doctor right away. They’ll typically have you stop taking the drug. They can also suggest a different treatment for your condition.

Blenrep and fertility

It isn’t known whether Blenrep can affect your fertility (the ability to become pregnant or make someone pregnant).

Blenrep’s effect on fertility in humans hasn’t been studied. But animal studies have shown that Blenrep may impact fertility in both males and females. Keep in mind that animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you and your partner are planning a pregnancy or have concerns about fertility, talk with your doctor before starting Blenrep treatment.

It isn’t safe to take Blenrep during pregnancy.* If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Blenrep.

For more information about taking Blenrep during pregnancy, see the “Blenrep and pregnancy” section above.

* Use of the terms “female” or “male” within this article refers to a person’s gender assigned at birth.

For females using Blenrep

If you can become pregnant, you should use an effective form of birth control during Blenrep treatment. You should also continue to use birth control for at least 4 months after your last dose of the drug.

For males using Blenrep

If you’re male and your partner can become pregnant, you should use birth control (such as condoms) while taking Blenrep. You should also continue to use birth control for another 6 months after you complete treatment.

You shouldn’t breastfeed while using Blenrep and for 3 months after your last dose. It’s not known if Blenrep can pass into breast milk during breastfeeding.

If you’re currently breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed while using Blenrep, talk with your doctor about treatment options other than Blenrep.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Blenrep.

Is Blenrep a chemotherapy drug?

No, Blenrep isn’t a chemotherapy drug. Chemotherapy drugs work by killing cells that grow rapidly. Cancer cells tend to grow faster than normal cells. But chemotherapy drugs can’t tell the difference between healthy cells and cancer cells. Therefore, healthy cells can be damaged by chemotherapy, which can lead to side effects from the drug.

Blenrep is a type of medication called an antibody-drug conjugate. This means that it contains an active drug that’s connected to an antibody (a type of protein used by your immune system). Blenrep works by targeting myeloma cells in your blood and causing them to die. The medication can identify myeloma cells more effectively than chemotherapy drugs can. Therefore, Blenrep tends to damage fewer healthy cells than chemotherapy drugs.

For more information on Blenrep, see the “How Blenrep works” section above. You can also talk with your doctor if you have other questions about Blenrep or chemotherapy.

Will Blenrep cure my multiple myeloma?

No, Blenrep won’t cure your multiple myeloma, which is a type of cancer. There’s no known cure for cancer at this time.

But in clinical studies, Blenrep was shown to be effective for treating multiple myeloma in certain situations. To learn about Blenrep’s effectiveness, see the “Blenrep uses” section above.

If you have more questions about what to expect with Blenrep treatment, talk with your doctor.

Do I need to have blood tests done while I’m using Blenrep?

Yes, you’ll probably have blood tests while using Blenrep.

Taking Blenrep may cause you to develop a low platelet level. (Platelets are blood cells that help your blood clot.) Your doctor will typically check your platelet level before you start taking Blenrep and continue to monitor it during treatment.

For more information about blood tests you may need to have during Blenrep treatment, talk with your doctor.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warning: Eye problems

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Taking Blenrep may cause changes to your cornea (the outer layer of your eye). This can lead to serious eye problems, including corneal ulcers (open sores on the cornea) and loss of vision. The changes can also cause dry eyes or blurry vision. Your doctor will typically check your vision before you start taking Blenrep and before you receive each dose. They’ll also check to see if you develop symptoms of any eye problems.

If you do have eye problems while taking Blenrep, your doctor may lower your dosage. Or, they may prescribe a different drug for your condition.

Because of this risk of eye problems, you’ll need to enroll in the Blenrep Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program. Your healthcare provider can help you complete the enrollment form. This program helps you and your doctor manage the risk of possible eye problems with the drug. You can only receive Blenrep if you’re enrolled in the Blenrep REMS program.

For more information, see “Side effect details” in the “Side effects” section above.

Other precautions

Before taking Blenrep, talk with your doctor about your health history. Blenrep may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Bleeding problems. Before taking Blenrep, tell your doctor if you have any bleeding problems. This is because taking Blenrep may result in a low platelet level, which can cause you to bruise or bleed more easily than usual. So, if you already have bleeding problems, taking Blenrep can raise your risk for bleeding even more. For more information, see the “Blenrep side effects” section above.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Blenrep or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take this drug. Ask your doctor about which other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It isn’t safe to use Blenrep during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Blenrep and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. You shouldn’t breastfeed while using Blenrep and for 3 months after your last dose. For more information, see the “Blenrep and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Blenrep, see the “Blenrep side effects” section above.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.