Ciprofloxacin is a generic prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to treat the following bacterial infections in certain situations:

Ciprofloxacin is also approved to help prevent infections from inhaled anthrax. The drug is used for this purpose in adults and children of any age exposed to anthrax bacteria.

For more information, see the “Ciprofloxacin for UTIs” and “Ciprofloxacin for other uses” sections below.

Drug details

Ciprofloxacin (also called ciprofloxacin hydrochloride) belongs to a class of drugs called fluoroquinolone antibiotics.

Ciprofloxacin comes as an oral tablet in 100-milligram (mg), 250-mg, 500-mg, and 750-mg strengths. The drug also comes in other forms, but this article does not cover them. These include IV solution, ear drops for ear infections, and eye drops for eye infections. Your doctor can tell you more about these other forms, their side effects, dosages, and more.

Brand-name versions

Ciprofloxacin oral tablet is the generic version of the brand-name drug Cipro.

The other forms of ciprofloxacin have different brand-name drug versions. For information on those versions, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Ciprofloxacin is a generic drug. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Cipro is the brand-name medication that ciprofloxacin is based on. A generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

If you’re interested in using Cipro instead of ciprofloxacin, talk with your doctor. They can tell you if Cipro comes in forms and strengths suitable for your condition. If you have insurance, you’ll also need to check whether your plan will cover Cipro.

To learn more about how generics compare with brand-name drugs, see this article.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as ciprofloxacin to treat certain conditions.

Ciprofloxacin is FDA-approved to treat urinary tract infections (UTIs) caused by certain bacteria. Specifically, the drug may be used to treat the following types of UTIs:

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

UTIs explained

UTIs are a type of infection that occur in your urinary tract. The urinary tract includes your bladder, kidneys, ureters, and urethra. Ureters are tubes that bring urine from your kidneys to your bladder. The urethra is the tube that brings urine from your bladder to the outside of your body.

UTIs that affect your bladder or urethra may be called bladder infections. Symptoms of bladder infections include:

  • urine that appears bloody or cloudy
  • an urge to urinate more often than usual
  • discomfort, pain, or a burning sensation when urinating
  • feeling as though your bladder is not completely empty

UTIs that affect your kidney or ureters may be called kidney infections. In addition to the symptoms above, kidney infections can cause other symptoms. Examples include nausea and vomiting, chills, fever, and confusion.

UTIs may be classified as “uncomplicated” or “complicated,” as described below:

  • uncomplicated UTIs typically occur in females* who:
    • are not pregnant
    • do not have a condition that affects the structure or function of their urinary tract
  • complicated UTIs typically occur in people who:
    • are pregnant
    • have gone through menopause
    • have a condition that affects the structure or function of their urinary tract

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

In addition to the uses mentioned above, ciprofloxacin may be used for other purposes. Below is information on other possible uses for ciprofloxacin.

Ciprofloxacin for gonorrhea

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved ciprofloxacin to treat gonorrhea caused by a certain bacterium. Gonorrhea is a sexually transmitted infection (STI), also known as a sexually transmitted disease (STD). For this purpose, ciprofloxacin is for use in adults.

Specifically, ciprofloxacin may treat gonorrhea that:

  • Affects the cervix or urethra. The cervix is the portion of the female* body that links the uterus to the vagina. The urethra is the tube that brings urine from your bladder to the outside of your body.
  • Is uncomplicated (it has not spread to the blood).

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Gonorrhea explained

Gonorrhea is a type of STI, which is an infection that passes from one person to another during sexual activity. The bacterium that causes gonorrhea infection may grow in various parts of the body. Examples include the cervix, urethra, uterus, anus, mouth, throat, or eyes. Ciprofloxacin is approved to treat gonorrhea that affects the cervix or urethra.

Many people with gonorrhea will not have any symptoms. When symptoms do occur, they may include:

  • discharge
  • swelling of the genitals
  • pain during urination
  • bleeding between periods

You can learn more about gonorrhea and other STIs by visiting our sexual health hub.

Ciprofloxacin for sinus infections

Ciprofloxacin is FDA-approved to treat acute sinus infections caused by certain bacteria. (An acute sinus infection typically lasts for a short time.) For this purpose, ciprofloxacin is prescribed for adults.

Sinus infections explained

Sinus infections occur when the lining of the sinus cavities becomes swollen. Bacteria, fungi, viruses, or allergies may cause this swelling.

Below are possible symptoms of a sinus infection:

  • pain or pressure around your forehead, eyes, or nose
  • runny or stuffy nose
  • sore throat
  • cough

Ciprofloxacin for abdominal infections, such as diverticulitis

Ciprofloxacin is FDA-approved to treat complicated abdominal infections in adults caused by certain bacteria. For this purpose, the drug is prescribed in combination with metronidazole (Flagyl).

Abdominal infections explained

Abdominal infections occur inside the abdominal cavity. An abdominal infection is considered to be “complicated” if it spreads from its original site into other areas of the abdomen.

Examples of abdominal infections include:

Symptoms of an abdominal infection may include abdominal pain or tenderness, fever, diarrhea, and loss of appetite.

Ciprofloxacin for additional uses

Ciprofloxacin is FDA-approved for many uses in addition to those described above. These include the following when caused by certain bacteria:

Ciprofloxacin is also approved to help prevent infections from inhaled anthrax. The drug is used for this purpose in adults and children of any age who have been exposed to anthrax bacteria.

Your doctor can tell you more about these conditions and how ciprofloxacin is used for them.

Ciprofloxacin and children

Ciprofloxacin is approved for the following uses in children in certain situations:

To learn more about these conditions, see the “Ciprofloxacin for UTIs” and “Ciprofloxacin for other uses” sections above.

Ciprofloxacin can cause mild or serious side effects. (You may also hear side effects referred to as adverse effects.) The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking ciprofloxacin. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of ciprofloxacin, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with ciprofloxacin, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Below is a partial list of mild side effects of ciprofloxacin. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view ciprofloxacin’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of ciprofloxacin can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. However, if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information about allergic reaction and ciprofloxacin, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from ciprofloxacin aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects can include:

* Ciprofloxacin has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is a serious warning from the FDA. To learn more, see the “Ciprofloxacin precautions” section below.
† For details about allergic reaction and ciprofloxacin, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Side effects in children

Ciprofloxacin is approved to treat and help prevent certain infections in children. (To learn more, see the “Ciprofloxacin for UTIs” and “Ciprofloxacin for other uses” sections above.)

Children given ciprofloxacin may have an increased risk of joint pain and arthritis as side effects of the drug. This is based on animal studies, which showed an increased risk of these side effects in young animals given ciprofloxacin. However, keep in mind that animal studies don’t always predict what happens with humans.

To learn more about your child’s risk of side effects with ciprofloxacin, talk with your child’s doctor.

Side effects in older adults

The side effects of ciprofloxacin in adults ages 65 years and older are similar to those in younger people.

However, older adults may be at a higher risk of certain side effects from ciprofloxacin. These include:

  • abnormal heart rhythm
  • aortic aneurysm (bulging of an artery called the aorta)
  • aortic dissection (tear in the aorta)
  • tendon problems*

In addition, older adults may have other health conditions that affect how their bodies respond to ciprofloxacin. These include kidney and liver problems. And these conditions could increase older adults’ risk of side effects from ciprofloxacin.

If you have questions about whether age may affect your risk of side effects from ciprofloxacin, talk with your doctor.

* Ciprofloxacin has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is a serious warning from the FDA. To learn more, see the “Ciprofloxacin precautions” section below.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking ciprofloxacin. This was a rare side effect in clinical trials of this drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to ciprofloxacin, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The ciprofloxacin dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re taking ciprofloxacin for
  • your age
  • other medical conditions you may have

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug strengths

Ciprofloxacin oral tablet is available in four strengths: 100 milligrams (mg), 250 mg, 500 mg, and 750 mg.

Dosages for treating certain infections

Below are the usual dosages of ciprofloxacin for each infection the drug is used to treat in adults.

InfectionDosageLength of treatment
urinary tract infections (UTIs)250 mg to 500 mg every 12 hours7 to 14 days
gonorrhea250 mg for 1 dose1 dose
sinus infections500 mg every 12 hours10 days
abdominal infections500 mg every 12 hours7 to 14 days
chronic prostatitis caused by certain bacteria500 mg every 12 hours28 days
joint and bone infections500 mg to 750 mg every 12 hours4 to 8 weeks
lower respiratory tract infections500 mg to 750 mg every 12 hours7 to 14 days
skin infections500 mg to 750 mg every 12 hours7 to 14 days
typhoid fever500 mg every 12 hours10 days
diarrhea caused by certain bacteria500 mg every 12 hours5 to 7 days
plague500 mg to 750 mg every 12 hours14 days

Dosage for preventing infections from inhaled anthrax

When used to help prevent infections from inhaled anthrax, the usual dosage of ciprofloxacin is 500 mg every 12 hours. This dosage is typically continued for 60 days.

Children’s dosage

Below are the usual children’s dosages of ciprofloxacin. Each dosage is based on a child’s weight in kilograms (kg). One kg is about 2.2 pounds (lb).

UseDosageLength of treatment
treatment of kidney infections and complicated UTIs10 mg/kg to 20 mg/kg (up to 750 mg) every 12 hours10 to 21 days
treatment of plague15 mg/kg (up to 500 mg) every 8 to 12 hours14 days
prevention of infections from inhaled anthrax15 mg/kg (up to 500 mg) every 12 hours60 days

For example, a 55-lb child weighs about 25 kg. To treat a kidney infection, the child’s dosage would be 250 mg every 12 hours. Your child’s doctor will determine what dosage is right for your child.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of ciprofloxacin, check when your next dose is needed. If it’s at least 6 hours away, take your missed dose as soon as you remember. However, if it’s less than 6 hours away, skip your missed dose and take your next dose at its usual time.

You should not take any extra doses to make up for a missed dose. Taking extra doses can increase your risk of side effects.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Ciprofloxacin is typically used as a short-term treatment. Your doctor can tell you how long treatment with ciprofloxacin typically lasts.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about ciprofloxacin.

How does ciprofloxacin compare with other antibiotics such as ofloxacin and azithromycin?

Below are a few ways ciprofloxacin compares with the drugs ofloxacin and azithromycin.

CiprofloxacinOfloxacinAzithromycin
Drug classfluoroquinolone antibioticsfluoroquinolone antibioticsmacrolide antibiotics
Forms• oral tablet
IV solution
• eye drops
• ear drops
• oral tablet
• eye drops
• ear drops
• oral tablet
• oral suspension
• IV solution
Usescertain bacterial infectionscertain bacterial infectionscertain bacterial infections

Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about how these medications compare.

Is ciprofloxacin approved to treat tooth infections or strep throat?

No, ciprofloxacin is not approved to treat tooth infections or strep throat.

However, the drug may be used off-label for these conditions. Off-label drug use is when a drug the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved is prescribed for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

If you have a tooth infection or strep throat, talk with your dentist or doctor. They can recommend the right treatment for your condition.

Could I have side effects after stopping ciprofloxacin treatment?

Yes, certain side effects of ciprofloxacin may continue even after you stop taking the drug.

For example, certain serious side effects may not go away after you stop taking ciprofloxacin. These include tendon problems, nerve problems, and central nervous system effects. In fact, ciprofloxacin has a boxed warning for these side effects. This is a serious warning from the FDA. To learn more, see the “Ciprofloxacin precautions” section below.

If you have questions about what to expect after stopping ciprofloxacin treatment, talk with your doctor.

Does ciprofloxacin come as 1,000-mg tablets?

No, ciprofloxacin does not come as 1,000-milligram (mg) tablets. Ciprofloxacin is available in the following forms:

  • oral tablet
  • IV solution*
  • eye drops
  • ear drops

In the past, an extended-release (ER) oral tablet form of ciprofloxacin was available in two strengths: 500 mg and 1,000 mg. However, these ER forms have been discontinued.

Your doctor and pharmacist can help answer additional questions you have about the forms of ciprofloxacin and which one is right for you.

* This form of ciprofloxacin can be given by a healthcare professional in a hospital or clinic. The typical dose for IV ciprofloxacin is 400 mg.

What’s the half-life of ciprofloxacin?

The half-life of ciprofloxacin is 4 hours.

A drug’s half-life is the amount of time it takes the body to eliminate half of a drug’s dose. This means it takes about 4 hours for your body to get rid of half a dose of ciprofloxacin.

It takes about five half-lives for a drug to leave your system entirely. For ciprofloxacin, this means the drug stays in your system for about 20 hours.

If you have other questions about the half-life of ciprofloxacin, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Ciprofloxacin can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe. Drug-condition interactions can also cause certain effects. For information about these interactions, see the “Ciprofloxacin precautions” section below.

Ciprofloxacin and other medications

Before taking ciprofloxacin, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

Below is a table of medications that can interact with ciprofloxacin. This table does not contain all drugs that may interact with ciprofloxacin.

Medication type or medication nameMedication examples
nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs)meloxicam (Anjeso, Mobic)
ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin)
naproxen (Aleve, Naprosyn)
corticosteroidsprednisone (Rayos)
• methylprednisolone (Medrol)
dexamethasone (Hemady)*
tricyclic antidepressantsamitriptyline
imipramine (Tofranil)
doxepin (Silenor)
macrolide antibioticsclarithromycin
azithromycin (Zithromax)
• erythromycin (Eryc, Ery-Tab, others)
antipsychotics• aripiprazole (Abilify, Aristada, others)
• clozapine (Clozaril, Versacloz)
olanzapine (Zyprexa, Zyprexa Relprevv, Zyprexa Zydis)
sulfonylureasglyburide (Diabeta, Glynase)
• glimepiride (Amaryl)
• glipizide (Glucotrol XL)
certain abnormal heart rhythm drugs• procainamide
amiodarone (Nexterone, Pacerone)
sotalol (Betapace, Sorine, others)
certain antacids• calcium carbonate (TUMS)
• aluminum hydroxide/magnesium hydroxide (Maalox)
tizanidine (Zanaflex)
theophylline (Elixophyllin, Theo-24)
phenytoin (Dilantin, Phenytek)
cyclosporine (Gengraf, Neoral, others)
warfarin (Jantoven)
methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, others)
ropinirole
sildenafil (Viagra, Revatio)
duloxetine (Cymbalta)
zolpidem (Ambien, Ambien CR, Edluar, Zolpimist)

* The interaction pertains to dexamethasone that’s that is for systemic use. (Systemic treatments affect the whole body.) An ear drop containing ciprofloxacin/dexamethasone (Ciprodex) is also available.

Your doctor or pharmacist can provide you with more information about the interactions between these medications and ciprofloxacin. If you have questions about any drug interactions that may affect you, your doctor or pharmacist can also address those.

Other interactions

Other types of interactions, such as those with herbs, supplements, foods, lab tests, and vaccines, may also occur with ciprofloxacin. The following table lists some of these interactions.

Cause of interactionExamples
herbs and supplementscaffeine supplements
• multivitamins or supplements that contain calcium, zinc, iron, or magnesium
foods and drinks• dairy products, such as milk and yogurt
• juices that contain calcium, such as orange juice
• foods or drinks that contain caffeine, such as dark chocolate or coffee

Your doctor can provide you with details about these interactions with ciprofloxacin.

There’s no known interaction between ciprofloxacin and alcohol.

However, drinking alcohol while taking ciprofloxacin could worsen some of the drug’s side effects. Examples include digestive problems, such as nausea and vomiting.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor before taking ciprofloxacin. They can advise you on whether you should limit the amount of alcohol you consume while taking the drug.

Below is important information about taking ciprofloxacin while pregnant or breastfeeding.

Ciprofloxacin and pregnancy

It’s not known for certain whether ciprofloxacin is safe to take while pregnant. However, reports of the drug’s use in pregnancy have not shown any harm to a pregnant person or fetus.

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor before taking ciprofloxacin. They’ll recommend whether the medication is a safe treatment option for you during pregnancy.

Ciprofloxacin and breastfeeding

It may not be safe to take ciprofloxacin while breastfeeding. The drug passes into breast milk, which may lead to side effects in a child who is breastfed.

For this reason, it’s recommended to avoid breastfeeding while you’re taking ciprofloxacin and for at least 2 days after your last dose.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to do so, talk with your doctor before starting ciprofloxacin treatment. They can advise you on other ways to feed your child while you’re taking the drug.

Ciprofloxacin and birth control

It’s not known whether ciprofloxacin is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using ciprofloxacin.

For more information about taking ciprofloxacin during pregnancy, see “Ciprofloxacin and pregnancy” above.

You may wonder how ciprofloxacin compares with other medications prescribed for similar uses. Ciprofloxacin is a generic drug. It’s available as the brand-name drug Cipro. To find out how Cipro is similar to and different from levofloxacin and other drugs, see this article.

You should take ciprofloxacin according to the instructions your doctor gives you.

Ciprofloxacin comes as an oral tablet that you swallow.

When used to treat certain abdominal infections, ciprofloxacin is prescribed in combination with metronidazole (Flagyl). This is because ciprofloxacin treats certain bacteria that cause abdominal infections, while metronidazole treats different bacteria.

For ciprofloxacin’s other uses, your doctor will let you know whether you should take the drug by itself or with other treatments.

When to take

For most uses, you’ll likely take ciprofloxacin twice per day.* You should take each dose at least 12 hours apart.

Taking the medication around the same time of day helps keep a steady level of the drug in your body. This helps ciprofloxacin work effectively.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

* For gonorrhea, you’ll usually take just one dose of ciprofloxacin.

Accessible labels and containers

If your prescription label is hard to read, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Some pharmacies offer labels that have large print, braille, or a code you scan with a smartphone to convert text to speech. If your local pharmacy doesn’t have these options, your doctor or pharmacist may be able to direct you to one that does.

If you have trouble opening medication bottles, ask your pharmacist if they can put ciprofloxacin in an easy-open container. They also may be able to recommend tools that can make it simpler to open lids.

Taking ciprofloxacin with food

You can take ciprofloxacin with or without food.

Some people have digestive side effects from ciprofloxacin. Examples include nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea. If you have digestive side effects, taking the drug with food may help ease your symptoms.

Keep in mind that certain foods and drinks can reduce the level of ciprofloxacin in your body. This includes dairy products, such as milk and yogurt, and juices that contain calcium. Having a lower level of ciprofloxacin in your system could make the drug less effective than usual for helping your condition.

For this reason, you should take ciprofloxacin at least 2 hours before or 6 hours after consuming any dairy products or juices that contain calcium. Doing so should help prevent these foods and drinks from affecting the level of ciprofloxacin in your body.

Can ciprofloxacin be crushed, split, or chewed?

You should not crush, split, or chew ciprofloxacin oral tablets. You should swallow the tablets whole.

If you have trouble swallowing ciprofloxacin tablets, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

As with all medications, the cost of ciprofloxacin can vary. The actual price you’ll pay for 100-milligram (mg), 250-mg, 500-mg, and 750-mg ciprofloxacin oral tablets depends on different factors. These include your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for ciprofloxacin, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for ciprofloxacin, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

Financial assistance to help you pay for ciprofloxacin may be available.

Medicine Assistance Tool and NeedyMeds are two websites offering resources that may help decrease the price you pay for ciprofloxacin. They also offer tools to help you find low cost healthcare, as well as educational resources. To learn more, visit their sites.

Mail-order pharmacies

Ciprofloxacin may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

This drug comes with several precautions. These are considered drug-condition interactions.

FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warnings. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Worsening of myasthenia gravis. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, may worsen the rare condition myasthenia gravis in people who already have it. (Myasthenia gravis causes muscle fatigue and weakness.)

Rarely, taking fluoroquinolones can lead to the need for a ventilator and, in certain instances, be fatal for people with myasthenia gravis. Due to this risk, doctors are not likely to prescribe ciprofloxacin if you have the condition. Your doctor can recommend a different treatment option for you.

Serious side effects such as tendon problems, nerve problems, and central nervous system effects. Fluoroquinolone antibiotics, including ciprofloxacin, may cause certain serious side effects. These include:

  • Tearing or inflammation of tendons (tissues that attach your muscles to your bones). Symptoms can include bruising, swelling, or severe pain in the affected area.
  • Peripheral neuropathy (a type of nerve damage). Symptoms can include numbness, tingling, or burning in your arms, hands, legs, or feet.
  • Central nervous system (CNS) effects. The CNS controls many of the body’s functions, including movement, thinking, and memory. Below are examples of CNS effects that may occur with ciprofloxacin:
    • dizziness
    • anxiety
    • memory problems

Before taking ciprofloxacin, be sure to tell your doctor if you have tendon problems. Also, tell them if you’ve had a heart, kidney, or lung transplant, or take corticosteroids. And be sure your doctor knows whether you’re older than age 60 years. These factors can increase your risk of tendon problems with ciprofloxacin.

If you’ve had any of the above side effects while taking ciprofloxacin in the past, your doctor likely will not prescribe this drug for you. They’ll advise you on a different treatment option for your condition.

If you have the side effects above while taking ciprofloxacin, tell your doctor as soon as possible. They’ll likely recommend that you stop taking the medication. In some cases, serious side effects from ciprofloxacin may not go away after you stop taking the drug. Your doctor can advise you on how to manage these side effects if they occur.

Other precautions

In addition to the boxed warnings mentioned above, ciprofloxacin has other warnings.

If any of the following medical conditions or other health factors pertain to you, be sure to talk with your doctor before taking ciprofloxacin.

  • if you’re pregnant or thinking about becoming pregnant
  • if you’re breastfeeding or thinking about breastfeeding
  • if you have heart problems, such as an abnormal heart rhythm or heart failure
  • if you have diabetes
  • if you have seizures
  • if you have a kidney or liver problem, such as kidney failure or liver failure

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of ciprofloxacin, see the “Ciprofloxacin side effects” section above.

Suicide prevention

If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:

  • Ask the tough question: “Are you considering suicide?”
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number, or text TALK to 741741 to communicate with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Try to remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline is available 24 hours a day at 988. During a crisis, people who are hard of hearing can use their preferred relay service or dial 711 then 988.

Click here for more links and local resources.

When you get ciprofloxacin from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has passed the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you can still use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store ciprofloxacin tablets at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). You can temporarily store the tablets at a temperature of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C), such as while traveling. Be sure to store the drug in a tightly sealed container, avoiding areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take ciprofloxacin and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Do not take more ciprofloxacin than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much ciprofloxacin

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.