Empaveli is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat a rare blood disorder called paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH). The drug is for use in adults.

With PNH, some of the red blood cells your body makes are abnormal. They lack a particular protein on their surface that would usually protect them from your immune system. As a result, your immune system destroys these red blood cells. This leads to anemia (low red blood cell count).

Drug details

Empaveli contains the active drug pegcetacoplan, which belongs to a class of medications called complement inhibitors. Empaveli works by stopping your immune system from destroying your red blood cells.

Empaveli comes as a liquid solution in a single-dose vial. The drug is given as a subcutaneous infusion. This is an injection under the skin that’s given over a period of time using a device known as an infusion pump. A healthcare professional can teach you or your caregiver how to give infusions at home. You’ll typically have Empaveli infusions twice a week.

Empaveli comes in one strength: 1,080 milligrams (mg) of the drug in a 20 milliliter (mL) liquid solution.

FDA approval

In 2021, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Empaveli to treat PNH. Empaveli works in a different way than other complement inhibitors that are approved for PNH treatment. Empaveli targets an immune system protein called complement protein C3. Other drugs for PNH target complement protein C5. These other drugs include eculizumab (Soliris) and ravulizumab (Ultomiris).

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Empaveli, see the “Empaveli uses” section below.

Empaveli is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to use the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Empaveli comes as a liquid solution in a single-dose vial. The drug is available in one strength: 1,080 milligrams (mg) of the drug in a 20 milliliter (mL) liquid solution.

Empaveli is given as a subcutaneous infusion. This is an injection under the skin that’s given over a period of time using a device known as an infusion pump. A healthcare professional can teach you or your caregiver how to give infusions at home.

Dosage for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

Paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) is a rare blood disorder in which your immune system destroys red blood cells. This leads to anemia (low red blood cell count).

The recommended dose of Empaveli for PNH is 1,080 mg. This is given twice per week as subcutaneous infusions.

In some cases, blood tests may show that you have a high level of an enzyme called lactate dehydrogenase. In this situation, your doctor may change your dosage to 1,080 mg every 3 days.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Empaveli, you should take it as soon as possible. Then continue with your regular dosing schedule.

Do not take two doses together to make up for a missed dose.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Empaveli is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Empaveli is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely use it long term.

Empaveli can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Empaveli. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Empaveli, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you have had with Empaveli, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Empaveli can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Empaveli. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Empaveli’s medication guide.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Empaveli aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects of Empaveli can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
† Empaveli has a boxed warning from the FDA for this side effect. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Serious infections

Empaveli can weaken part of your immune system and make it harder for your body to fight infections. To be specific, the drug can increase your risk for serious infections caused by a certain type of bacteria called encapsulated bacteria. Empaveli has a boxed warning from the FDA for this side effect. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Examples of encapsulated bacteria include:

  • Streptococcus pneumoniae
  • Neisseria meningitidis types A, B, C, W, and Y
  • Haemophilus influenzae type B

These bacteria can cause serious, life threatening infections such as pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis (blood infection). If not treated quickly, these infections can, in rare cases, lead to death.

Symptoms of serious infection can include:

What you can do about serious infections

To lower your risk for these infections, you should be up to date on your vaccinations. If not, you’ll likely receive a vaccine for the bacteria mentioned before you start treatment with Empaveli. Here’s some information to keep in mind:

  • If you have not received these vaccines in the past, you should ideally get them at least 2 weeks before your first dose of Empaveli. This gives the vaccines time to work.
  • If you need urgent treatment with Empaveli, your doctor may want you to start Empaveli sooner than 2 weeks after receiving the vaccines. In this case, you’ll likely also need to take antibiotics to help prevent infections. You’ll take the antibiotics for the first 2 weeks of Empaveli treatment.
  • If you have received vaccines for these bacteria in the past, ask your doctor if you need any booster doses before you start taking Empaveli.

Although vaccination reduces the risk of serious infections, it may not prevent it completely.

Your doctor should give you a patient safety card about the risk of serious infections with Empaveli. Keep this with you while taking Empaveli and for 2 months after your last dose.

If you develop any symptoms of serious infections while taking Empaveli, see your doctor right away. They’ll typically prescribe antibiotics to treat it. You may need to be treated in a hospital. You may also need to stop taking Empaveli until the infection gets better. Call 911 or local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening.

Talk with your doctor to learn more about serious infections and Empaveli.

Due to the risk of serious infections, only doctors who are enrolled in a certain drug safety program can prescribe Empaveli. The name of the program is the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program.

Other infections

In addition to possibly causing the serious infections mentioned above, Empaveli can increase your risk for less serious infections. In fact, infections were among the most common side effects reported in clinical studies of Empaveli. To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Examples of these infections include:

Symptoms vary depending on the type of infection. But they may include:

What you can do

To help lower your risk for infections while taking Empaveli, try to avoid close contact with people who are sick or have an infection. You can also follow these tips.

If you have symptoms of an infection while taking Empaveli, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may be able to recommend a suitable over-the-counter treatment.

You can also ask your doctor for more information about how to help prevent infections while taking Empaveli.

Injection site reactions

Empaveli is given as a subcutaneous infusion. This is an injection under the skin that’s given over a period of time using an infusion pump. It’s possible to develop skin reactions around the area where the infusion is given. These injection site reactions may include:

  • redness, darkening, or discoloration
  • warmth or swelling
  • bruising
  • hardening
  • itching or pain

In studies, injection site reactions were one of the most common side effects reported with Empaveli.* The reactions were typically mild or moderate. Injection site reactions usually go away in a few days.

* To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

What you can do

To help reduce your risk for injection site reactions, follow your doctor’s instructions for taking Empaveli.

To help prevent irritation, use a different injection site each time you have an infusion. Make a note of the date and area you use, so you can use a different spot the next time. Also, avoid rubbing the injection site after you’ve had your infusion.

Keep in mind that you should not inject Empaveli into areas of skin that are tender, bruised, hard, red, or discolored. And do not inject the drug into areas with stretch marks, scars, or tattoos.

If you have an injection site reaction, applying a cold pack may help reduce pain or swelling. Tell your doctor if you have an injection site reaction that’s severe or doesn’t go away in a few days.

Digestive problems

Empaveli can sometimes cause digestive problems. These include diarrhea as well as pain, tenderness, or discomfort in your abdomen (belly). In studies, diarrhea and abdominal pain were commonly reported with Empaveli.* These side effects are usually mild.

Keep in mind that diarrhea can sometimes be a symptom of an infection in your stomach or intestines, such as stomach flu.

* To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

What you can do

If you have diarrhea while taking Empaveli, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may recommend taking medication such as loperamide (Imodium). Keep in mind that it’s also important to drink plenty of fluids when you have diarrhea. This helps prevent you from becoming dehydrated.

You should also talk with your doctor if you have abdominal pain that’s bothersome, so they can help determine if Empaveli is the cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Empaveli. Allergic reactions while taking Empaveli were rare in clinical studies of the drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Empaveli, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Empaveli to treat certain conditions.

Empaveli for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

Empaveli is FDA-approved for use in adults to treat a rare blood disorder called paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH).

With PNH, some of the red blood cells made by your body are abnormal. They lack a particular protein on their surface that would usually protect them from your immune system. As a result, your immune system destroys the red blood cells.

The destruction of red blood cells is called hemolysis, and a symptom of it is urine that’s red or dark. But not everyone with PNH has this symptom. There may be periods when hemolysis gets worse, such as when you have an infection, following an accident, or during times of stress.

PNH causes anemia and a low hemoglobin level. (Anemia is a low red blood cell count, and hemoglobin is a red pigment that carries oxygen.) This can cause mild or severe symptoms, depending on how low these levels are. Examples of these symptoms can include:

Severe hemolysis can also cause other symptoms, such as:

Some people with PNH also have problems with blood clots. These clots may block blood supply to the legs, lungs, liver, stomach, intestines, or brain. Blood clots can cause different symptoms depending on the part of the body they affect.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Effectiveness for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria

Empaveli is an effective treatment for PNH. The drug has been shown to increase your hemoglobin level and reduce the need for blood transfusions to treat anemia. To read more about how Empaveli performed in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Empaveli and children

Empaveli is approved to treat PNH only in adults. The drug hasn’t been studied in children, so it’s not known if this medication is safe or effective for them.

You’ll usually take Empaveli by itself. But when you first start treatment for paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), you might take Empaveli with other medications.

For example, you may be currently using a different drug for PNH, such as eculizumab (Soliris) or ravulizumab (Ultomiris). For information on switching to Empaveli, see the “Common questions about Empaveli” section below.

In some cases your doctor may have you start Empaveli treatment within 2 weeks of receiving certain vaccinations. In such a situation, you might need to take antibiotics in the first 2 weeks of Empaveli treatment. The antibiotics help prevent infection* while the vaccines start to work.

If you have questions about usingEmpaveli with other drugs, talk with your doctor.

* Empaveli has a boxed warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for serious infections caused by encapsulated bacteria. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. To learn more, see “Serious infections” in the “Empaveli side effects” section above.

Empaveli isn’t known to interact with alcohol. But if you have certain side effects from Empaveli, such as diarrhea, headache, or fatigue (lack of energy), drinking alcohol could make them worse.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe to drink while taking Empaveli.

Interactions between Empaveli and other medications, supplements, or foods haven’t been reported. However, this doesn’t mean that interactions won’t occur.

Before taking Empaveli, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Empaveli and lab tests

Empaveli may interfere with certain lab tests that measure activated partial thromboplastin time. These tests measure how long it takes blood to clot, which may be referred to as your international normalized ratio (INR). The tests are used to monitor treatment with blood thinning drugs such as warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). Empaveli can cause incorrect results in these tests.

If you need blood tests to check your clotting time, make sure your doctor knows that you’re taking Empaveli. Your doctor may need to tell the lab to use a different kind of test.

As with all medications, the cost of Empaveli can vary. To find current prices for Empaveli in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for Empaveli, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Empaveli, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Empaveli, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Apellis Pharmaceuticals Inc., the manufacturer of Empaveli, offers a program called Apellis Assist. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 866-MY-APL-ASSIST (866-692-7527). Or you can visit the program website.

Generic version

Empaveli is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Empaveli is given by subcutaneous infusion. This is an injection under the skin that’s given over a period of time using a device known as an infusion pump. A healthcare professional may give you the infusions at first. They can also teach you or your caregiver how to give infusions at home.

The infusion can be given into the following sites:

  • your belly, avoiding the area 2 inches (5 centimeters) around your belly button
  • your thighs
  • your hips
  • the back of your upper arms

You should use a different site each time you take a dose to help prevent irritation. Make a note of the date and site you used so you can be sure to use a different site next time. For information on how to help avoid injection site reactions, see “Side effect details” in the “Empaveli side effects” section.

You can find detailed step-by-step instructions for taking Empaveli here. An instruction video is also available on the manufacturer’s website. In addition, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist for tips on how to administer Empaveli.

When it’s given

You’ll likely have Empaveli infusions twice per week. But if blood tests show a high level of an enzyme called lactate dehydrogenase, your doctor may have you take Empaveli every 3 days.

You can have your Empaveli dose at any time of day on your scheduled days.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

Empaveli is used to treat a rare blood disorder called paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH).

With PNH, your immune system destroys your red blood cells. This leads to anemia (low red blood cell count).

What happens with PNH

Red blood cells develop in your bone marrow (a spongy material inside your bones) from immature cells called stem cells. Usually, red blood cells develop a layer of proteins on their surface that protects them from your immune system. With PNH, a genetic change in certain stem cells causes some red blood cells to develop without this protective layer. These red blood cells are vulnerable to attack from a part of your immune system called the complement system.

The complement system is a group of proteins that work together with other parts of your immune system, including white blood cells and antibodies. The system helps find and destroy foreign or abnormal material in your body.

The complement system finds the abnormal red blood cells in your blood vessels, liver, and spleen. The system destroys these red blood cells through a process called hemolysis, during which the blood cells break apart. When the red blood cells split up, they release hemoglobin (a red pigment that carries oxygen). The hemoglobin leaves your body in your urine and can make your urine red. This is called hemoglobinuria.

People with PNH have anemia. They also have low levels of hemoglobin in their blood. Anemia may need to be treated with blood transfusions.

What Empaveli does

Empaveli works by blocking the complement system part of your immune system. The drug does this by attaching to a complement protein known as complement protein C3. This stops the complement system from destroying the red blood cells in your blood vessels, liver, and spleen.

Empaveli helps increase your red blood cell count and hemoglobin level. This helps ease the symptoms of anemia. It can also reduce your need for blood transfusions.

How long does it take to work?

Empaveli starts working soon after you have your first infusion. It can take a few weeks before the drug builds up its effectiveness and you notice your symptoms ease.

It’s not known if Empaveli is safe to take during pregnancy. The drug hasn’t been studied in people who are pregnant.

In animal studies, Empaveli increased the risk of pregnancy loss when it was given to pregnant females.* But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you have paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH), it’s usually recommended that you avoid becoming pregnant. PNH can cause serious risks for you and the fetus during pregnancy. These risks include blood clots, infections,† bleeding, pregnancy loss, premature delivery, and low levels of blood cells.

If you’re able to become pregnant, your doctor will order a pregnancy test for you before you start treatment with Empaveli. This is so your doctor can be sure that you’re not pregnant before you begin taking the medication.

If you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking Empaveli.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.
† Empaveli has a boxed warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for serious infections caused by encapsulated bacteria. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. To learn more, see “Side effect details” in the “Empaveli side effects” section.

It’s not known if Empaveli is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re taking Empaveli.

For more information about using Empaveli during pregnancy, see the “Empaveli and pregnancy” section above.

For females taking Empaveli

Females* who could become pregnant should use effective birth control while taking Empaveli and for 40 days after their last dose.

For males taking Empaveli

The manufacturer of Empaveli hasn’t given birth control recommendations for males* taking this drug. If you’re a male and your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while taking Empaveli.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

You shouldn’t breastfeed while taking Empaveli or for 40 days after your last dose.

It’s not known if Empaveli passes into breast milk or if it can affect a child who’s breastfed. If Empaveli does pass into breast milk, it could possibly cause serious side effects in a child who is breastfed.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to, talk with your doctor. They can advise you on healthy ways to feed your child and whether Empaveli is right for you.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Empaveli.

Will I have to be monitored after stopping Empaveli treatment?

Yes, you will need to be monitored after you end Empaveli treatment. After you stop taking Empaveli, your immune system may start to destroy your red blood cells again. This could cause the symptoms of paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria (PNH) to come back.

Your doctor will monitor your condition for at least 8 weeks after you end Empaveli treatment. You’ll likely have blood tests to check your:

After you stop taking Empaveli, tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of PNH. See the “Empaveli uses” section above for details.

If your condition gets worse after you stop taking Empaveli, your doctor may recommend that you restart the treatment. Talk with your doctor if you have other questions about monitoring that you may need.

If needed, how will my doctor switch my treatment from either eculizumab or ravulizumab to Empaveli?

Eculizumab (Soliris) and ravulizumab (Ultomiris) are two other medications that may be used to treat PNH. You may be taking one of these before you start taking Empaveli.

If your doctor has you switch from eculizumab to Empaveli, you’ll likely start taking Empaveli while you’re still using eculizumab. After 4 weeks, you’ll stop using eculizumab and continue to use Empaveli alone.

If your doctor has you switch from ravulizumab to Empaveli, you’ll likely start taking Empaveli within 4 weeks of stopping ravulizumab treatment. Talk with your doctor if you have any questions about switching or which PNH treatment may be right for you.

The timing involved in switching drugs helps prevent a condition called hemolysis, which is the destruction of red blood cells.

Does Empaveli cure paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria?

No, Empaveli doesn’t cure PNH. The drug works to stop your immune system from destroying your abnormal red blood cells. Empaveli also helps correct anemia and low hemoglobin level. But the medication doesn’t stop your bone marrow (the spongy tissue inside your bones) from making abnormal red blood cells. If you stop treatment with Empaveli, your immune system will typically start to destroy your abnormal red blood cells again.

The only cure for PNH is to have a bone marrow transplant.

To find out more, talk with your doctor. They can tell you what to expect from taking Empaveli. They can also advise you on whether you could be a candidate for a bone marrow transplant.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warning: Serious infections

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Empaveli may increase your risk for serious infections caused by certain bacteria, especially a type called encapsulated bacteria. The infections can include pneumonia, meningitis, and sepsis (blood infection). If not treated quickly, these infections can, in rare cases, lead to death.

To reduce your risk for these infections, you should be up to date on your vaccinations. If not, you’ll likely need to be vaccinated against the bacteria before you start treatment with Empaveli.

If you have not had these vaccines in the past, you should ideally get them at least 2 weeks before your first dose of Empaveli. This gives the vaccines time to work. If your doctor wants you to start Empaveli sooner than this, you’ll also need to take antibiotics for the first 2 weeks of Empaveli treatment. If you have had vaccines against these bacteria in the past, ask your doctor if you need any booster doses before you start Empaveli.

Although vaccination reduces the risk of these serious infections, it may not prevent them completely. See your doctor right away if you have symptoms of serious infections while taking Empaveli, such as:

Due to the risk of serious infections, only doctors who are enrolled in a certain drug safety program can prescribe Empaveli. The name of the program is the Risk Evaluation and Mitigation Strategy (REMS) program.

Other precautions

Before taking Empaveli, talk with your doctor about your health history. Empaveli may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reaction. If you have had an allergic reaction to Empaveli or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Empaveli. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Empaveli is safe to use during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Empaveli and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. You shouldn’t breastfeed while taking Empaveli or for 40 days after stopping treatment. For more information, see the “Empaveli and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Empaveli, see the “Empaveli side effects” section above.

Do not use more Empaveli than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you use too much Empaveli

If you think you have taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Empaveli from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the packaging. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store Empaveli vials in a refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Be sure to keep the vials in their original carton to protect them from light.

Before you take Empaveli, it will need to come to room temperature. If you don’t use a vial after it has warmed up, you should dispose of it. You shouldn’t put it back in the refrigerator.

Disposal

Right after you have an Empaveli infusion, dispose of the needles, syringes, and infusion tubing in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from using the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needles. You can buy a sharps container online, or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.