Fabrazyme (agalsidase beta) is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat Fabry disease in adults, as well as in children ages 2 years and older.

Fabry disease is a rare condition that’s inherited (passed down genetically through families). With this disease, a gene abnormality causes a type of fat to build up in your body. This can lead to symptoms that vary from mild to severe and life threatening. See the “Fabrazyme uses” section below for details.

Drug details

Fabrazyme is an enzyme replacement therapy. Its active ingredient is an enzyme (a type of protein) called agalsidase beta. The drug works by replacing a certain enzyme that either isn’t produced by your body, or that doesn’t work correctly.

Fabrazyme comes as a powder that’s mixed with liquid to form a solution. The solution is then given by a healthcare professional as an intravenous (IV) infusion.* The drug comes in two strengths: 5 milligrams (mg) and 35 mg.

Typically, you’ll receive a Fabrazyme infusion every 2 weeks. At first, you’ll receive infusions at your doctor’s office or a clinic. You may eventually be able to receive infusions from a healthcare professional who visits your home. See the “How Fabrazyme is administered” section below for details.

* IV Infusions are injections given slowly into your vein.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Fabrazyme, see the “Fabrazyme uses” section below.

Fabrazyme’s active ingredient is an enzyme (a type of protein) called agalsidase beta. Fabrazyme is a biologic medication that’s only available in brand-name form.

Instead of generic forms, biologic drugs may have approved biosimilar forms. But Fabrazyme doesn’t have an approved biosimilar at this time.

Biosimilar drugs are considered as safe and effective as brand-name biologics (their parent drug). But unlike generics, which are made from chemicals, biosimilars aren’t exact copies of their parent drug. This is because biosimilars are made using live cells. This process creates small differences between the biosimilar and the parent drug.

As with all medications, the cost of Fabrazyme can vary. To find current prices for Fabrazyme in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

It’s important to note that you may need to get Fabrazyme through a specialty pharmacy, which will send the drug to a healthcare facility or healthcare professional on your behalf. A specialty pharmacy is authorized to dispense specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively. In some cases, you may get the drug directly from the healthcare facility or healthcare professional.

Before approving coverage for Fabrazyme, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Fabrazyme, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Fabrazyme, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Genzyme Corporation, the manufacturer of Fabrazyme, offers the CareConnectPSS Copay Assistance Program. Through this program, the cost of Fabrazyme may be lowered. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 800-745-4447 or visit the program website.

The manufacturer also offers other financial assistance to people who qualify. For information about this assistance program, visit its website.

If you don’t have insurance, ask your doctor or pharmacist about other financial support options.

Generic or biosimilar version

Fabrazyme is only available as a brand-name, biologic medication.

Biologic drugs don’t have generic forms. Instead, they may have approved biosimilar* forms. But Fabrazyme doesn’t currently have an approved biosimilar.

* Biosimilar drugs are considered as safe and effective as brand-name biologics (their parent drug). But unlike generics, which are made from chemicals, biosimilars aren’t exact copies of their parent drug. This is because biosimilars are made using live cells. This process creates small differences between the biosimilar and the parent drug.

The dosage of Fabrazyme your doctor prescribes depends on your weight and whether you experience certain serious side effects from the drug. The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to follow the Fabrazyme treatment plan your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Fabrazyme comes as a powder inside single-dose vials. The powder comes in two strengths: 5 milligrams (mg) and 35 mg. The powder will be mixed with liquid to form a solution. Then, the solution is given by a healthcare professional as an intravenous (IV) infusion. IV infusions are injections given slowly into your vein.

Dosage for Fabry disease

You’ll receive a Fabrazyme infusion every 2 weeks to treat Fabry disease.

Fabrazyme infusions typically last for several hours. Your infusion rate (how quickly the drug is injected into your body)* and your dosage will be based on:

  • your body weight in kilograms (one kilogram equals about 2.2 pounds [lbs])
  • whether you’ve had a serious infusion-related reaction or serious allergic reaction to Fabrazyme†

The table below lists the recommended doses for Fabrazyme infusions. These are given as milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of body weight. But make sure to always follow the treatment plan prescribed by your doctor.

Dose typeDose amount
Usual dose1 mg/kg
Rechallenge dose0.5 mg/kg

For example, the usual dosage for an adult who weighs 70 kg (about 154 lbs) would be 70 mg, given every 2 weeks.

A rechallenge dosage is recommended if you have a known allergy to Fabrazyme, or if you’ve formed antibodies to the drug. (Antibodies are proteins made by your immune system in response to foreign substances.) Having antibodies may increase your risk for infusion-related reactions and allergic reactions to Fabrazyme.†

With a rechallenge dosage, you’ll be given a smaller first dose of Fabrazyme, at a slower infusion rate than usual. Then, your doctor or healthcare professional will gradually increase your dosage and your infusion rate up to the usual levels, based on how well your body tolerates this.

* See the “How Fabrazyme is administered” section below for details about how long your infusions might take.
† See the “Fabrazyme side effects” section below for details about these reactions.

Children’s dosage

Fabrazyme is approved to treat Fabry disease in children ages 2 years and older, as well as in adults.

Fabrazyme dosages for children are the same as the dosages for adults. See the “Dosage for Fabry disease” section above for details.

What if I miss an infusion?

For Fabrazyme to work effectively, you should receive the drug as prescribed by your doctor. If you need to reschedule an appointment for an infusion, or if you miss an appointment, call your doctor or clinic right away to reschedule.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Fabry disease is a lifelong health condition. The severity and symptoms of Fabry disease can vary, but most people will need treatment to manage the condition or its symptoms throughout their life. If you and your doctor find that Fabrazyme is safe and effective, you’ll likely use it long term.

Fabrazyme can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur with Fabrazyme. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Fabrazyme, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Fabrazyme, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Fabrazyme can include:

  • cough, stuffy nose, or sore throat
  • dizziness
  • headache
  • rash or itching
  • swelling in your lower legs, feet, or hands
  • tingling or prickly feeling in your hands, feet, or other body parts
  • tiredness
  • muscle pain or muscle spasm (involuntary muscle tightening)
  • tinnitus (ringing in your ears)
  • generalized pain, back pain, or pain in your hands or feet
  • chills or feeling cold†
  • fever, feeling hot, or flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)†
  • upper respiratory infection

Most of these side effects tend to be manageable. They may go away as you continue Fabrazyme treatment. But some mild side effects can be signs of more serious side effects. For example, a rash or itching can be signs of an infusion-related reaction or allergic reaction. Also, other mild side effects can be symptoms of Fabry disease, such as tinnitus and feeling cold or hot.

If you have new or worsening symptoms, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. If your symptoms become severe or seem life threatening, seek emergency medical care, or call 911 right away.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Fabrazyme. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Fabrazyme’s prescribing information.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Fabrazyme can cause serious side effects, some of which are common. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Or, call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

For more information about these serious side effects, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effects in children

Fabrazyme is approved for use in children ages 2 and older, as well as adults. In clinical studies of Fabrazyme use in both children and adults, the side effects were generally the same in both age groups. For lists of possible side effects, see “Mild side effects” and “Serious side effects” above.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Infusion-related reactions

Reactions to intravenous (IV) infusions of Fabrazyme are a common side effect of the drug.

IV infusions are injections given slowly into your vein. Infusion-related reactions to Fabrazyme may cause mild or serious symptoms, such as:

  • hives (itchy welts on your skin)
  • itching
  • low or high blood pressure
  • fast heart rate
  • trouble breathing
  • chills, feeling cold, or shivering
  • fever, feeling hot, or flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)
  • swelling in your lower legs, hands, or feet
  • pain in your hands or feet
  • chest pain or a tight throat
  • headache
  • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
  • tingling in your hands or feet
  • abdominal (belly) pain
  • stuffy nose
  • tiredness

Fabrazyme infusions are given by a healthcare professional, and they typically last from 1.5 hours to several hours. You’ll be monitored during and after your infusion for symptoms of a reaction. Symptoms may occur at any time during an infusion. Symptoms can also occur after an infusion is over, including later in the day.

As you continue Fabrazyme treatment, you may experience fewer infusion-related reactions. But it’s also possible for these reactions to keep occurring during treatment.

You may be more likely to experience infusion-related reactions if your body has certain antibodies to Fabrazyme. Antibodies are proteins that your immune system makes in response to foreign substances. Your doctor may order certain tests to check for these antibodies.

Also, if you have heart disease, you may be at increased risk for serious infusion-related reactions. Before starting Fabrazyme, tell your doctor if you have heart problems.

Management of infusion reactions

Tell a healthcare professional if you have any new or unusual symptoms during or after Fabrazyme infusions.

To help prevent and manage reactions, your doctor or healthcare professional may:

  • give you premedications (medications to take before starting your Fabrazyme infusion) to help prevent certain serious reactions to the drug*
  • give you medications during your infusion
  • infuse Fabrazyme at a slower rate than usual, or stop your infusion for a short time

But if you have a serious infusion reaction with Fabrazyme, your doctor may stop your treatment and give you emergency medical care, such as oxygen. In some cases after a serious reaction, your doctor may decide to have you receive Fabrazyme again, but at a lower dosage and slower rate than usual. This is called a rechallenge dosage. For more details, see the “Fabrazyme dosage” section above.

* For more information about premedications that may be used with Fabrazyme, see the “Fabrazyme use with other drugs” section below.

Upper respiratory infections

During Fabrazyme treatment, you may be more likely to get upper respiratory infections (such as sinus infections) or symptoms of these infections. Symptoms may include a cough, stuffy nose, chest congestion, or a sore throat. These are common side effects of the drug.

While using Fabrazyme, tell your doctor if you have mild symptoms that bother you. They may suggest an over-the-counter treatment, such as a cough suppressant or nasal decongestant. If you develop a bacterial infection, you may need a prescription antibiotic to treat it.

If you have severe symptoms, or if your symptoms get worse or don’t go away, talk with your doctor right away. A stuffy nose and chest congestion could be symptoms of Fabry disease, or they could be signs of an infusion-related reaction, which can be serious (see “Infusion-related reactions” above). Your doctor can help determine how serious your symptoms are and what treatments are needed.

Changes in body temperature

Fabrazyme may cause changes in your body temperature. This may include chills, feeling cold, and fever. These are common side effects of Fabrazyme.

Also, infusion-related reactions are common with Fabrazyme. And changes in your body temperature during or after an infusion can be symptoms of these reactions. (See “Infusion-related reactions” above for details.)

Some symptoms of Fabry disease can also affect your body temperature. These symptoms may include an inability to produce sweat or to cope with hot or cold temperatures. Overheating with activity and feelings of being hot or cold (such as a fever) can also be signs of Fabry disease.

If you have any of the above symptoms or changes in your body temperature, talk with your doctor right away. They can determine the cause and suggest the right treatments for you.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction with Fabrazyme. To manage this side effect, you’ll only receive the drug from a healthcare professional who has access to emergency medical care. During a Fabrazyme infusion, tell your doctor right away if you have any of the symptoms below.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

Severe allergic reactions, such as anaphylaxis, are rare but possible. Anaphylaxis is a life threatening allergic reaction. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

After a Fabrazyme infusion or between appointments, call your doctor right away if you have any symptoms of an allergic reaction. This is important, because the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Keep in mind that you may be more likely to have an allergic reaction if you have certain antibodies to Fabrazyme. Antibodies are proteins that your immune system makes in response to foreign substances. In some cases, your doctor may order certain tests to check for antibodies to the drug.

Other drugs are available that can treat Fabry disease. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Fabrazyme, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat Fabry disease include:

  • migalastat (Galafold)
  • agalsidase alfa (Replagal)

Note: Replagal isn’t approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in the United States. Currently, this drug is only available as an enzyme replacement therapy for treating Fabry disease in Europe and certain other countries.

Below is some information on how Fabrazyme is administered. Make sure to follow the Fabrazyme treatment instructions given to you by your doctor or other healthcare professional. You can also find more details about starting Fabrazyme and other resources on the drug’s website.

About Fabrazyme infusions

Fabrazyme is given as an intravenous (IV) infusion, which is an injection given slowly into your vein.

You may receive Fabrazyme infusions through a vein in your arm or through a port. Ports are small devices that are placed under your skin for a period of time. They create an opening on the outside of your body that connects to a vein. This can make it more convenient for you to receive regular IV infusions.

Before starting each Fabrazyme infusion, you may be given premedications. These are medications to help prevent infusion-related reactions and allergic reactions to Fabrazyme. See the “Fabrazyme use with other drugs” section below for more details and examples of these drugs.

At first, you’ll receive Fabrazyme infusions at your doctor’s office, a hospital, or an infusion center. In time, you may be able to receive infusions from a healthcare professional who visits your home. But this depends on certain factors, including whether you’ve had serious side effects with the drug.

No matter where you get your infusions, you’ll be closely monitored for side effects. And emergency medical care will be available to treat serious reactions, such as anaphylaxis (a life threatening allergic reaction). See “Fabrazyme side effects” above for more details about this and other side effects.

Infusion time

Fabrazyme infusions typically last for several hours. The minimum amount of time needed for an infusion is 1.5 hours.

Your doctor or healthcare professional will adjust your infusion rate (how quickly the drug is injected into your body) based on:

  • your weight,
  • whether it’s your first Fabrazyme infusion, and
  • whether you’ve had an infusion-related reaction or allergic reaction to the drug*

In general, your infusion rate will be slower the less you weigh. It’ll also be slower if you experience side effects from the drug. If you don’t experience infusion side effects and you weigh more than 30 kilograms (about 14 pounds), your infusion rate may be increased gradually as you continue treatment.

* See “Fabrazyme side effects ” above for details about these side effects.

When it’s administered

Typically, you’ll receive a Fabrazyme infusion every 2 weeks.

To help make sure that you don’t miss an infusion appointment, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

Fabrazyme treatment with food

You can receive Fabrazyme infusions on a full or empty stomach. Eating food doesn’t affect how the medication works in your body.

You may want to consider bringing a snack or beverage to your appointment, since Fabrazyme infusions can last several hours. Your doctor or healthcare professional may advise you to avoid certain foods or drinks on the day of your infusion. For example, if you’ve felt hot or flushed with past infusions, it may be recommended that you avoid hot, caffeinated drinks for the entire day of your appointment.

But depending on where you receive your infusions, you may need to avoid eating or drinking during Fabrazyme infusions. Before starting your treatment, talk with your doctor or healthcare professional about any food restrictions.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Fabrazyme to treat certain conditions. Fabrazyme is approved to treat Fabry disease that’s been diagnosed in adults, as well as in children ages 2 years and older.

About Fabry disease

Fabry disease is a rare, serious condition that’s inherited. This means it’s passed down genetically through families. This condition is more likely to cause symptoms in males, but may also affect females.*

With Fabry disease, the gene that usually causes your body to make an enzyme called alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) is abnormal. An enzyme is a type of protein. Your body needs the GLA enzyme to break down a type of fat that exists in most of your cells. When GLA is not produced by your body or doesn’t work correctly, a type of fat called globotriaosylceramide (GL3) builds up in certain tissues and organs.

Without treatment, Fabry disease can lead to health problems that get worse over time. These problems may be mild or life threatening, such as:

Enzyme replacement therapy, such as Fabrazyme, is the primary treatment for Fabry disease. Fabrazyme acts like the GLA enzyme in your body. The drug helps to break down GL3 fat and keep this fat from building up in your body. This may help prevent lasting damage to your tissues or organs.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Effectiveness for Fabry disease

In clinical studies, Fabrazyme was effective for treating Fabry disease in adults. For details on how the drug performed in studies, visit the drug’s website or see its prescribing information.

Note: In clinical studies, Fabrazyme cleared GL3 from certain cells in people’s hearts, kidneys, and skin. But it’s unknown how lowering GL3 buildup in these organs may affect certain symptoms of Fabry disease. Make sure to talk with your doctor about whether Fabrazyme treatment may be effective for you.

Fabrazyme and children

Fabrazyme has been found effective for treating Fabry disease in children ages 2 years and older. Clinical studies of the drug included children as well as adults.

Fabrazyme is approved to treat Fabry disease that’s been diagnosed in adults as well as children ages 2 years and older. While you’re receiving Fabrazyme treatment, your doctor may also prescribe other medications to help prevent or manage serious side effects of the drug.

For example, your doctor may prescribe premedications for you to take before each Fabrazyme infusion. These are drugs that help prevent or treat infusion-related reactions and allergic reactions with Fabrazyme. Infusion-related reactions are common side effects of Fabrazyme, which is given as an IV infusion.*

Examples of premedications that you may be prescribed include:

If you develop symptoms of a reaction during or after an infusion, your doctor may prescribe more doses of your premedication. But if you have serious symptoms (such as trouble breathing or severe swelling), they may stop your infusion and give you emergency treatments. These treatments may include oxygen, bronchodilators, or epinephrine.

* An IV infusion is an injection given into your vein over time. For details on infusion-related reactions and allergic reactions, see the “Fabrazyme side effects” section above.
† Hives are raised, itchy welts on your skin.
‡ Flushing refers to temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color.

Your doctor may advise you to avoid alcohol while receiving Fabrazyme treatment. Although Fabrazyme doesn’t interact with alcohol, alcohol may worsen some side effects of Fabrazyme. These can include headache, tiredness, and dizziness.

Also, you may be prescribed premedications to take before or during Fabrazyme infusions, to help prevent or treat serious reactions. Alcohol may not be safe to use with some of these drugs, such as acetaminophen (Tylenol) and diphenhydramine (Benadryl). See the “Fabrazyme use with other drugs” section just above for more examples of these medications.

Lastly, Fabry disease can lead to tissue and organ damage throughout your body. Avoiding alcohol can help you stay as healthy as possible during treatment for this condition.

If you have questions about drinking alcohol during your Fabrazyme treatment, talk with your doctor. They can advise you on how much, if any, alcohol is safe to drink while your condition is being treated with Fabrazyme.

Many drugs can interact with other medications. And different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can affect how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

But Fabrazyme doesn’t have any known drug interactions. And it isn’t known to interact with any herbs, supplements, or foods.

Fabrazyme and medications

Fabrazyme generally doesn’t interact with other drugs. But you should always talk with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any prescription or over-the-counter medications with Fabrazyme.

Fabrazyme and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any vitamins, herbs, or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Fabrazyme. But you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products during Fabrazyme treatment.

Fabrazyme and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Fabrazyme. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Fabrazyme, talk with your doctor. There’s also more information about this in the “How Fabrazyme is administered” section above.

Fabrazyme is approved to treat Fabry disease that’s been diagnosed in adults as well as children ages 2 years and older.

What happens with Fabry disease

With Fabry disease, the gene that usually causes your body to make an enzyme called alpha-galactosidase A (GLA) is abnormal. An enzyme is a type of protein. GLA normally helps break down a type of fat called globotriaosylceramide (GL3), which is present in most of your body’s cells.

When you have Fabry disease, GLA is not produced by your body or doesn’t work correctly. This leads to GL3 building up in your cells. Without treatment, this can lead to mild or serious health problems, including organ damage.

What Fabrazyme does

Fabrazyme is an enzyme replacement therapy that contains the active ingredient agalsidase beta. Agalsidase beta is an enzyme that acts like GLA in your body. This means Fabrazyme works in place of GLA that’s not produced by your body, or that doesn’t work correctly.

Specifically, Fabrazyme helps break down GL3 fat in your body. This allows your body to clear the fat from your system and keep it from building up. This may help prevent lasting damage to your tissues or organs.

Note: In clinical studies, Fabrazyme cleared GL3 from certain cells in people’s hearts, kidneys, and skin. But it’s unknown how lowering GL3 buildup in these organs may affect certain symptoms of Fabry disease.

How long does it take to work?

How long it takes for Fabrazyme to bring your GL3 levels down to normal may depend on factors such as:

  • the amount of GL3 in your body before starting the drug
  • your Fabrazyme dosage
  • whether you miss any doses

In a clinical study, some people’s kidney, heart, or skin tissues were fully cleared of GL3 after 5 months of Fabrazyme treatment.

To learn more about how long it may take Fabrazyme to lower GL3 in your body, talk with your doctor.

It’s unclear if Fabrazyme is safe to use during pregnancy. The drug’s use during pregnancy hasn’t been studied clinically in humans. But people have used Fabrazyme during pregnancy since the drug was released onto the market, and no negative effects have been reported.

In animal studies, the drug didn’t cause harm to offspring when it was given to pregnant animals. But animal studies don’t always predict human outcomes.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the right Fabry disease treatment plan for you.

Fabry disease patient registry

If you decide to use Fabrazyme during pregnancy, talk with your doctor about joining the patient registry for Fabry disease.

This registry tracks the health of people with Fabry disease, including the effects of using Fabrazyme during pregnancy. This information can help doctors and their patients make better choices about treating Fabry disease during pregnancy. To join, ask your doctor about the Sanofi Genzyme Rare Disease Registries.

Fabrazyme and fertility

It’s not known if Fabrazyme treatment affects fertility (the ability to have children). There aren’t any studies of how the drug may affect fertility in humans.

In an animal study, Fabrazyme didn’t affect fertility. But animal studies don’t always predict what may happen in humans.

If you’re concerned about your fertility while using Fabrazyme, talk with your doctor.

It’s unclear if Fabrazyme is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Fabrazyme.

For more information about using this drug during pregnancy, see the “Fabrazyme and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Fabrazyme treatment is safe for use while breastfeeding. Specifically, it’s not known if the drug passes into breast milk or affects milk production.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before receiving Fabrazyme. They can review the drug’s risks and benefits with you. Also, your doctor can suggest healthy ways to feed your child.

Fabry disease patient registry

If you decide to breastfeed while receiving Fabrazyme, talk with your doctor about joining the patient registry for Fabry disease.

This registry tracks the health of people with Fabry disease, including the effects of using Fabrazyme while breastfeeding. These details can help doctors and their patients make better choices about treating Fabry disease. To join, ask your doctor about the Sanofi Genzyme Rare Disease Registries.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Fabrazyme.

Can older adults take Fabrazyme?

Fabrazyme can be prescribed for older adults, including people ages 65 years and older. But clinical studies of the drug’s safety and effectiveness didn’t include many people ages 65 years and older. So it’s unclear whether Fabrazyme may affect older adults differently than younger adults.

If you’re an older adult with Fabry disease, talk with your doctor about the best treatment plan for you.

What’s the patient registry for Fabrazyme?

The patient registry collects information about Fabry disease, such as:

  • people’s symptoms and how they change over time
  • how the disease affects females*
  • long-term effects of various treatments, such as Fabrazyme
  • any effects that treatments such as Fabrazyme cause during pregnancy or while breastfeeding

This information is then used to help doctors, healthcare professionals, and researchers improve medical care for all people with Fabry disease.

If you’d like to join the registry, ask your doctor to visit the Sanofi Genzyme Rare Disease Registries.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Does Fabrazyme cure Fabry disease?

No, Fabrazyme isn’t a cure for Fabry disease. Typically, Fabrazyme is taken as a long-term treatment for this condition.

Currently there isn’t a cure for Fabry disease. But researchers are studying new potential treatments for this condition, including gene therapies. If you’re wondering about these treatments, talk with your doctor.

Before taking Fabrazyme, talk with your doctor about your health history. Fabrazyme may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • A history of infusion-related reactions with Fabrazyme. If you’ve had a reaction to receiving Fabrazyme by intravenous (IV) infusion, tell your doctor before starting the drug again. (IV infusions are injections given slowly into your vein.)
  • Heart problems. Advanced Fabry disease can cause heart problems as a complication. You may have an increased risk for certain serious infusion-related reactions if you have heart problems. Talk with your doctor about your heart health before starting Fabrazyme.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Fabrazyme or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Fabrazyme. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s unclear if Fabrazyme treatment is safe during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Fabrazyme and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Fabrazyme treatment is safe while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Fabrazyme and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Fabrazyme, see the “Fabrazyme side effects” section above.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.