Glipizide IR and ER oral tablets are generic prescription drugs. They’re FDA-approved to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Glipizide is used along with diet and exercise to help manage blood sugar levels.

This drug’s use has certain limitations. For details, see the “Glipizide oral tablets uses” section below.

Drug details

Glipizide belongs to a drug class called sulfonylureas. (A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way.) This drug class is used to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Glipizide oral tablets are tablets that you swallow. They are available in the following forms and strengths:

  • glipizide immediate-release (IR) tablets, which come in 5 milligrams (mg) and 10 mg
  • glipizide extended-release (ER) tablets, which come in 2.5 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg

Glipizide IR tablets are an immediate-release form of the drug. This means the tablets release all of the active drug into your body right away. They’re different from glipizide ER tablets, which slowly release the active drug into your body over a period of time.

Brand-name versions

Glipizide oral tablets are generic drugs. The brand-name version of glipizide IR oral tablet is Glucotrol. The brand-name version of glipizide ER oral tablet is Glucotrol XL.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of glipizide oral tablets, see the “Glipizide oral tablets uses” section below.

Glipizide oral tablets are generic drugs. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Glucotrol is the brand-name medication of glipizide IR oral tablet, and Glucotrol XL is the brand-name medication of glipizide ER oral tablet. A generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

If you’re interested in taking Glucotrol or Glucotrol XL instead of glipizide oral tablets, talk with your doctor. If you have insurance, you’ll also need to check whether your plan will cover these drugs.

To learn more about how generics compare with brand-name drugs, see this article.

Glipizide oral tablets can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking glipizide oral tablets. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of glipizide oral tablets, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with glipizide oral tablets, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of glipizide oral tablets can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

The list above is a partial list of mild side effects from glipizide oral tablets. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view the prescribing information on glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

*For more information about this side effect, see “Gastrointestinal problems” in “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from glipizide oral tablets are less common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
† This side effect was reported after the drug was released on the market.

Side effect details

See below for more detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Hypoglycemia

Glipizide oral tablets are used to manage blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. But in some cases, glipizide may cause your blood sugar to drop too low. This causes hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

The American Diabetes Association defines hypoglycemia as a blood sugar level of 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL) or lower.

In clinical studies of glipizide oral tablets, low blood sugar was more common in people with certain risk factors or in certain situations. These may include:

  • older age (65 years and older)
  • kidney, liver, or adrenal gland problems
  • use of insulin or other drugs that lower blood sugar
  • use of alcohol
  • frequently skipping meals or not eating regularly
  • participation in intense or prolonged exercise

To find out how often hypoglycemia occurred in clinical studies, see prescribing information on glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

You may notice certain symptoms when your blood sugar first begins to drop too low. These may include feeling nervous or anxious, shaking, sweating, or feeling clammy.

If your blood sugar continues to drop, severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) may occur. This is a medical emergency and requires urgent treatment. If not treated quickly, it can cause the following:

To prevent low blood sugar from becoming severe, it is important to recognize the early symptoms listed above. Before starting glipizide, you and your doctor will come up with a hypoglycemia action plan. The plan will include what you should do at the first sign of low blood sugar.

Some people may not notice the early symptoms of low blood sugar due to having other medical conditions or taking certain medications, such as beta-blockers. In this case, your doctor may recommend a different medication or prescribe a lower dose of glipizide for you. They may also suggest checking your blood sugar more often.

Before taking glipizide, talk with your doctor about your risk for low blood sugar during your treatment. It’s also important to talk with them about your health history and the medications you take.

Cardiovascular problems

In 1970, a University Group Diabetes Program (UGDP) research study showed that taking certain diabetes drugs long term may increase the risk of death due to cardiovascular (heart- or blood vessel-related) problems. However, a more recent study has not supported this finding. Also, the UGDP study didn’t specifically involve glipizide. It involved tolbutamide, another drug in the sulfonylurea drug class that is discontinued. But because glipizide is a sulfonylurea drug, it may also increase this risk.

Because of this risk, it’s important to talk with your doctor about your heart health before starting glipizide. Your doctor may look at whether you have risk factors for cardiovascular disease, such as:

The American Diabetes Association also recommends drugs other than sulfonylureas as the first treatment option for people with cardiovascular disease. So if you have cardiovascular disease, your doctor can help determine whether another treatment option is better for you.

Gastrointestinal problems

Gastrointestinal (digestive system) problems are common side effects of glipizide. These may include side effects such as:

These gastrointestinal side effects tend to improve on their own within the first few days or weeks of treatment.

However, if these side effects don’t go away, or if they bother you or become severe, talk with your doctor. They may suggest ways to relieve these side effects, or they may adjust your dosage of glipizide.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking glipizide oral tablets. Allergic skin reactions, sometimes temporary, were reported in clinical studies of the drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

For more information on study results, see prescribing information on glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to glipizide oral tablets, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The glipizide oral tablets dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • your age
  • other medical conditions you may have
  • other medications you may be taking

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it until you reach the dosage that’s right for managing your blood sugar. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug strengths

Glipizide oral tablets are tablets that you swallow. They are available in the following forms and strengths:

  • glipizide immediate-release (IR) tablets, which come in 5 milligrams (mg) and 10 mg
  • glipizide extended release (ER) tablets, which come in 2.5 mg, 5 mg, and 10 mg

Glipizide IR tablets are an immediate-release form of the drug. This means the tablets release all of the active drug into your body right away. They’re different from glipizide ER tablets, which slowly release the active drug into your body over a period of time.

Dosage for type 2 diabetes

The recommended starting dosage of glipizide oral tablet for most adults with type 2 diabetes is 5 mg per day. However, your doctor may recommend starting you with 2.5 mg if you:

  • have certain medical conditions
  • are taking certain medications
  • are 65 years or older

But be sure to take the dosage that your doctor prescribes.

You and your doctor will closely monitor your blood sugar levels after you start glipizide. If your blood sugar is still too high after a few days or weeks, your doctor will likely increase your dose.

You may take glipizide IR tablets more than once per day. It’s important that you eat a meal 30 minutes after you take a dose of glipizide IR. If your total daily dose of glipizide IR is 15 mg or more, you’ll likely take it in smaller doses throughout the day. For example, you may take one 5 mg tablet three times per day. The maximum dose of glipizide IR tablets is 40 mg total per day.

You take glipizide ER tablets once per day with breakfast or your first meal of the day. The maximum dosage for glipizide ER tablets is 20 mg per day.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss your dose of glipizide, you should take it as soon as possible, but only if you plan to eat a meal, as follows:

  • Glipizide IR tablets are meant to be taken 30 minutes before a meal. If you miss a dose, you should take it as soon as you remember, but only if you eat a meal within 30 minutes. If you can’t eat a meal within 30 minutes of the dose, you should skip the missed dose.
  • Glipizide ER tablets are meant to be taken with a meal, usually breakfast or your first meal of the day. If you miss taking it with breakfast, you can still take it later that day with a meal. If you can’t take your dose with a meal, you should skip the missed dose.

Regardless of which type of glipizide oral tablet you take (IR or ER), you should not take two doses at the same time. Taking more than one dose can increase your risk of side effects such as hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

To help make sure that you do not miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or downloading a reminder app on your phone. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to take this drug long term?

Glipizide is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that glipizide oral tablets are a safe and effective treatment for you, you’ll likely take glipizide long term.

Other drugs are available that can treat type 2 diabetes. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to glipizide oral tablets, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use means taking a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Some examples of other drugs that may treat type 2 diabetes include:

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about glipizide oral tablets.

What drug class does glipizide belong to?

Glipizide belongs to a drug class called sulfonylureas. (A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way.) This drug class is used to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes.

Does glipizide cause weight gain or weight loss?

Weight changes weren’t reported in clinical studies of glipizide oral tablets.

However, weight gain has been commonly reported by people taking glipizide after glipizide IR tablets became available on the market. To help prevent or minimize weight gain, you should take glipizide alongside diet and exercise.

Glipizide may cause more weight gain than other diabetes medications, such as metformin and sitagliptin.* (Diabetes medications are drugs used to lower blood sugar in people with diabetes).

For more information on study results, see prescribing information on glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

If you have questions about weight changes with glipizide, talk with your doctor. They can talk with you about healthy ways to manage your weight.

* Sitagliptin is the active drug in Januvia, another drug commonly used to treat type 2 diabetes.

What will happen if you take glipizide, and you don’t eat?

If you do not eat within 30 minutes of taking glipizide IR tablets or do not eat a meal with glipizide ER tablets, your blood sugar may drop too low. This increases your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). In some cases, hypoglycemia can become serious and may require urgent treatment.

You should only take your dose of glipizide oral tablet if you plan to eat a meal. If you’re temporarily ill and unable to eat a meal, you shouldn’t take your dose of glipizide.

If you can’t take your dose because you can’t eat a meal, you should check your blood sugar when you usually take your next dose. If your blood sugar reading is low (70 milligrams per deciliter or less), you should follow your hypoglycemia action plan as instructed by your doctor. If it’s higher than your goal range, it’s best to call your doctor for the next steps.

If you accidentally take glipizide but forget to eat, you should check your blood sugar. If it’s low, or if you develop symptoms of low blood sugar, you should follow your hypoglycemia action plan as instructed by your doctor.

For more information about hypoglycemia as a side effect, see “Low blood sugar” in “Side effect details” above.

How much does glipizide lower your blood sugar level?

On average, glipizide can reduce blood sugar by 1% to 2%, as measured by the A1C blood test. The A1C test measures a person’s average blood sugar over 3 months.

After about 3 months of glipizide treatment, your doctor will check your A1C. They’ll use the results to see how well the drug is working for you. You’ll also check and track your blood sugar levels according to your doctor’s recommendations. If glipizide is working the way it should, you may notice that your blood sugar readings are within or close to your goal range.

If you have questions about what to expect from your glipizide treatment, talk with your doctor. They can also give you more information about your A1C and blood sugar goal ranges.

Can glipizide cause kidney-related side effects?

No, glipizide shouldn’t cause kidney-related side effects. Kidney problems weren’t reported in people who took glipizide oral tablets in clinical studies.

However, glipizide may not be safe for some people who already have kidney problems, such as kidney disease. People with kidney problems have a higher risk of developing hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Before starting glipizide, tell your doctor if you have a history of kidney problems. They may start you on a low dosage of the drug or suggest a different medication.

For more information on possible side effects, see the prescribing information for glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

Will I have hair loss with glipizide?

Glipizide doesn’t cause hair loss. This side effect wasn’t reported in clinical studies of the drug.

However, diabetes can cause hair loss, especially if your blood sugar isn’t managed well. Taking your diabetes medications correctly and following a balanced diet and lifestyle may help manage your blood sugar. This may help prevent or reduce hair loss.

If you have questions about hair loss, talk with your doctor. They may want to do a check-up or use blood tests to look for other possible causes.

Drinking alcohol may increase your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) with glipizide. It may also increase the frequency or severity of certain side effects, such as nausea and dizziness.

There have also been rare reports of severe reactions when glipizide IR tablets were taken with alcohol. (These reactions occurred after glipizide IR tablets became available on the market.) These severe reactions are called disulfiram-like reactions. Symptoms of disulfiram-like reactions may include severe nausea and vomiting, flushing, and heart rate and blood pressure changes.

For more information on these reactions, see prescribing information on glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

Alcohol consumption may also make it harder for you to manage your blood sugar. For more information about drinking alcohol with diabetes, talk with your doctor. You can ask them how much alcohol (if any) is safe for you to drink while taking glipizide.

Glipizide oral tablets can interact with several other medications. Different interactions can lead to different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Glipizide and other medications

Before taking glipizide oral tablets, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you take. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

Below is a list of medications that can interact with glipizide oral tablets. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with glipizide.

Certain types of drugs can increase the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) or worsen hypoglycemia when taken with glipizide. Careful monitoring of blood sugar levels is needed if you take these drugs with glipizide. Examples of these drugs include:

Some medications can make the warning signs of hypoglycemia less noticeable if they’re taken with glipizide. If you take these drugs with glipizide, it’s recommended that you check your blood sugar more often. Examples of these drugs include:

  • beta-blockers, such as metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
  • clonidine (Catapres, Kapvay)

Certain drugs can affect how well glipizide manages your blood sugar. This is because they can cause hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Examples of these drugs include:

Colesevelam (WelChol) can also cause glipizide ER tablets to be less effective. Because of this risk, you should take glipizide ER tablets at least 4 hours before taking colesevelam.

Other drugs may interact with glipizide oral tablets. If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Glipizide oral tablets and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with glipizide oral tablets. However, some herbs and supplements can possibly lower your blood sugar. This may increase your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) with glipizide.

It’s best to always check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products while taking glipizide oral tablets.

Glipizide oral tablets and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with glipizide oral tablets. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Glipizide oral tablets, talk with your doctor.

Glipizide oral tablets are prescription generic drugs that you take along with diet and exercise to manage blood sugar in adults with type 2 diabetes.

Glipizide’s mechanism of action

Glipizide’s mechanism of action (the way it works in the body) is that it helps your pancreas release more insulin.

Usually, when you eat a meal, the carbohydrates (sugar) from your food gets absorbed into your bloodstream. Your pancreas then releases insulin. Insulin is a hormone that signals your body to move sugar out of your bloodstream and into your cells. But if you have type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t release or respond to insulin properly. This causes your blood sugar to stay high.

When you take glipizide with a meal, it helps decrease the level of sugar in your blood.

How long does it take to work?

How long glipizide takes to work depends on which type of tablet you take.

Glipizide IR tablets begin to lower your blood sugar 30 minutes after you take a dose. The drug reaches its full effects 1 to 3 hours after each dose.

Glipizide ER tablets begin to lower your blood sugar 2 to 3 hours after you take a dose.

You may not notice glipizide oral tablets working in your body. In most cases, the only way to determine if the drug is working is to check your blood sugar level.

Talk with your doctor about how often you should check your blood sugar. They can tell you what your goal range should be. They’ll also give you instructions for what to do if your blood sugar readings are too high or too low.

How long does it stay in your system?

The effects of glipizide IR tablets begin to wear off about 3 hours after you take your dose. But the drug may continue to help manage your blood sugar for up to 24 hours after each dose.

Glipizide ER tablets slowly release the active drug into your body. The drug reaches its full effects 6 to 12 hours after each dose. After taking glipizide ER tablets once daily for 5 days in a row, the medication reaches a steady level in your system. The drug’s effects usually last about 24 hours before they start to wear off.

You should take glipizide oral tablets according to the instructions your doctor or other healthcare professional gives you.

When to take

The timing of your dose of glipizide depends on which type of tablet you take.

If you take glipizide IR tablets, you’ll take each dose 30 minutes before you eat a meal. If you take glipizide ER tablets, you’ll take your dose once per day with breakfast or your first meal of the day.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting a timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. An alarm clock can work, too.

Taking glipizide oral tablets with food

It’s important to take glipizide oral tablets with a meal. You should take glipizide IR tablets 30 minutes before a meal. You should take glipizide ER tablets with a meal.

If you aren’t able to eat a meal, you shouldn’t take your dose of glipizide. Doing so could lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

Common questions about taking glipizide

Here are some common questions about taking glipizide.

Can glipizide oral tablets be crushed, split, or chewed?

It depends on which type of glipizide oral tablets you take.

It’s fine to crush, split, or chew glipizide IR tablets.

But you shouldn’t crush, split, or chew glipizide ER tablets. Doing so could destroy the slow-release design of these tablets. Glipizide ER tablets slowly release the active drug from a shell that doesn’t dissolve. Some people may occasionally notice this empty shell in their stool. This is normal, and your body will still absorb the medication. It’s not a cause for concern.

When should you take glipizide twice daily?

You should follow your doctor’s directions for how often you should take glipizide oral tablets.

If you take glipizide IR tablets, follow your doctor’s instructions for how many doses to take per day. If your total dose is less than 15 mg per day, you’ll likely take it once daily. If your total dose is 15 mg or more per day, you’ll likely take it in smaller doses throughout the day. For example, you may take one 5 mg tablet three times per day, 30 minutes before each meal.

If you take glipizide ER tablets, you’ll likely take one dose once per day.

For more information about dosage, see “Glipizide oral tablets dosage” above.

Is there a best time to take glipizide?

Yes, but it depends on which type of glipizide oral tablets you take.

If you take glipizide IR tablets, you should take your dose 30 minutes before a meal. If you take glipizide ER tablets, you should take your dose with breakfast or your first meal of the day.

Can you take glipizide at night?

Depending on the form of glipizide you take, you will take glipizide with your first meal of the day or 30 minutes before a meal (see above).

If you take glipizide IR tablets, you may take a dose 30 minutes before your dinner. But you wouldn’t take a dose late at night or at bedtime.

You should follow your doctor’s instructions on when to take glipizide.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs, such as glipizide oral tablets, to treat certain conditions. Glipizide oral tablets may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means taking a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Glipizide oral tablets for type 2 diabetes

Glipizide is FDA-approved to manage blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. It’s approved for use along with diet and exercise.

This drug has certain limitations of use. People with type 1 diabetes or with diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) should not take glipizide. DKA is a life threatening complication of diabetes. It can happen when the body breaks down fats too quickly.

It’s important to note that glipizide is only effective in people with diabetes whose bodies can make insulin. When type 2 diabetes progresses, your pancreas may completely stop producing insulin. Glipizide works by stimulating insulin release from the pancreas. If you have insulin-dependent type 2 diabetes, talk with your doctor about other treatment options.

About type 2 diabetes

With type 2 diabetes, you have a high level of sugar in your blood. Typically, your body uses insulin to help move sugar from your blood into your cells. Once the sugar gets inside your cells, your body can use it to make energy. But with type 2 diabetes, your body doesn’t use insulin as well as it once did. As a result, your blood sugar levels remain high. If your diabetes progresses (gets worse over time), your body may completely stop making insulin.

By managing your blood sugar levels with medications, a balanced diet, and regular exercise, you may be able to slow down the progression of type 2 diabetes.

To learn more about type 2 diabetes, check out Medical News Today’s diabetes hub.

Effectiveness for type 2 diabetes

Clinical studies showed that glipizide oral tablets effectively managed blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes. For more information on study results, see the prescribing information for glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets.

Glipizide oral tablets aren’t usually recommended as a first-choice option for everyone with type 2 diabetes. This is because other options are available, such as metformin, that don’t usually increase the frequency or severity of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). With glipizide, hypoglycemia is a more common side effect and can sometimes be more severe.

The American Diabetes Association recommends sulfonylureas (the drug class that glipizide’s belongs to) to treat type 2 diabetes in people who can’t take other medications, such as metformin. Doctors may add sulfonylureas as a second treatment when other options aren’t working well enough.

Be sure to follow your doctor’s recommendations. They can let you know the best options for you based on your individual health and medical history.

Glipizide oral tablets and children

Glipizide oral tablets are not FDA-approved for use in children. The drug is only approved for use in adults with type 2 diabetes.

As with all medications, the cost of glipizide oral tablets can vary. To find current prices for glipizide IR oral tablets and glipizide ER oral tablets in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of glipizide oral tablets. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for glipizide oral tablets, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for glipizide oral tablets, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

Financial assistance to help you pay for glipizide oral tablets may be available.

Medicine Assistance Tool and NeedyMeds are two websites offering resources that may help decrease the price you pay for glipizide oral tablets. They also offer tools to help you find low-cost healthcare, as well as educational resources. To learn more, visit their sites. You can also learn more about saving money on prescriptions here.

Mail-order pharmacies

Glipizide oral tablets may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of glipizide oral tablets, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Before taking glipizide oral tablets, talk with your doctor about your health history. Be sure to tell your doctor if you’ve had an allergic reaction to any drugs. If you can, describe what happened during your reaction.

Glipizide oral tablets have contraindications. (A contraindication is a reason that someone should not take a drug.) These include:

  • You’ve had an allergic reaction to glipizide itself or any of its ingredients.
  • You’ve had an allergic reaction to a sulfonamide.
  • You have type 1 diabetes or diabetic ketoacidosis.

If any of these contraindications apply to you, you should not take glipizide oral tablets. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.

Glipizide oral tablets may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Conditions or other factors that increase your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Glipizide oral tablets may cause hypoglycemia, a common side effect. Certain medical conditions or other factors may further increase the risk of this side effect. If you are affected by any of the following factors, it’s best to talk with your doctor before taking glipizide. If you start treatment with the drug, they’ll likely have you check your blood sugar often.
    • older age (65 years and older)
    • use of insulin or other drugs that lower blood sugar
    • use of alcohol
    • frequently skipping meals or not eating regularly
    • participation in intense or prolonged exercise
  • G6PD deficiency. People who have an enzyme deficiency known as glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) deficiency may develop hemolytic anemia with glipizide oral tablets. Be sure to talk with your doctor if you have this enzyme deficiency. They’ll likely recommend another treatment option to control your blood sugar levels.
  • Cardiovascular problems. Taking sulfonylureas (the drug class that glipizide belongs to) long term may increase the risk of death due to cardiovascular (heart- or blood vessel-related) problems. If you already have cardiovascular problems, your risk may be higher. It’s important to talk with your doctor about your heart problems. They can let you know whether another treatment may be a safer option for you.
  • Short bowel syndrome. Glipizide ER tablets may not work properly for people who have short bowel syndrome. This is because the condition may affect how well your body absorbs nutrients or drugs. If you have this condition, your doctor may suggest glipizide IR tablets or a different treatment option instead.
  • Pregnancy. Taking glipizide isn’t usually recommended during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Glipizide oral tablets and pregnancy” section below.
  • Breastfeeding. Taking glipizide isn’t usually recommended while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Glipizide oral tablets and breastfeeding” section below.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of glipizide oral tablets, see the “Glipizide oral tablets side effects” section above.

Taking more than the recommended dosage of glipizide oral tablets can lead to serious side effects.

Do not take more glipizide than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

An overdose of glipizide oral tablets can cause severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar). Symptoms may include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Taking glipizide isn’t usually recommended during pregnancy. This is because other treatment options are available to manage your blood sugar that may have fewer risks during pregnancy.

If your doctor recommends that you take glipizide during your pregnancy, they’ll likely have you stop the drug at least 2 weeks before your due date. If not, the infant could be born with hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) that could last up to 10 days.

If you become pregnant during your glipizide treatment, talk with your doctor. They’ll guide you on the safest treatment options for you during pregnancy.

Taking glipizide isn’t usually recommended during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re taking glipizide oral tablets.

For more information about taking glipizide oral tablets during pregnancy, see the “Glipizide oral tablets and pregnancy” section above.

Glipizide use isn’t recommended while breastfeeding. The drug may pass into breast milk and increase the risk of harmful effects in a breastfed child. These side effects may include:

  • trouble breathing
  • low body temperature
  • excessive sleepiness
  • trouble feeding
  • seizures

Because of these risks, it’s best to talk with your doctor before breastfeeding while taking glipizide. They may recommend other treatment or feeding options, depending on your health history and goals.

When you get glipizide oral tablets from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid taking expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store glipizide IR tablets at temperatures below 86°F (30°C). You should store glipizide ER tablets at temperatures of 68 to 77°F (20 to 25°C).

Keep both types of tablets in a tightly sealed container away from light. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take glipizide oral tablets and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.