Idhifa is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to treat relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults. Specifically, Idhifa is used for AML with a certain gene mutation (abnormal change).

AML is a type of blood cancer that mostly affects your white blood cells. (White blood cells are immune cells that help protect you from infection-causing germs.)

With relapsed AML, your AML has come back after being in remission (a period of time when you don’t have any AML signs or symptoms). With refractory AML, your AML isn’t responding to your current treatment plan.

For more information about AML and how Idhifa is used to treat it, see the “Idhifa for AML” section below.

Drug details

The active drug in Idhifa is enasidenib. It belongs to a class of drugs called IDH2 inhibitors. (A drug class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.)

Idhifa comes as tablets that are taken by mouth. It’s available in two strengths: 50 milligrams (mg) and 100 mg.

FDA approval

In 2017, Idhifa was approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the use described above. The drug was reviewed and approved with orphan status. Currently, it’s the only drug available in its class.

Drugs with orphan status are created to treat rare conditions that lack effective treatment options.

For these drugs, the FDA reviews their safety and effectiveness information with priority. Then, if the drug is approved, it can become available on the market more quickly than usual.

Makers of drugs with orphan status must request this status from the FDA for their medication. Then, the makers must conduct trials to prove that their medication is safe and effective, even after it receives its initial approval as an orphan drug.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Idhifa, see the “Idhifa for AML” section below.

Idhifa contains the active drug enasidenib. It’s available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Like all drugs, Idhifa may cause side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Idhifa. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Idhifa, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Idhifa, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

The mild side effects* of Idhifa, which can rarely become serious, include:

These side effects should be manageable or diminish over time while you’re taking Idhifa. But if any of your side effects become severe or don’t go away, tell your doctor right away.

Also, keep in mind that your doctor may order lab tests to check for certain side effects of Idhifa. So, be sure to keep all appointments for labs and other tests during your Idhifa treatment.

* To learn more about this drug’s side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Idhifa’s prescribing information.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects with Idhifa treatment are common. Call your doctor right away if you have new or unusual symptoms as they may be serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Tumor lysis syndrome (a condition that occurs when cancer cells release their contents into your body). Symptoms can include:
    • extreme tiredness
    • nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea
    • muscle weakness, cramps, or spasms
    • tingling in your extremities or around your mouth
  • Leukocytosis (high white blood cell count).*
  • Allergic reaction.*
  • Differentiation syndrome.†

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
† Idhifa has a boxed warning for differentiation syndrome. This is the most serious warning from the FDA. To learn more, see ”Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Differentiation syndrome

Treatment with Idhifa increases your risk for differentiation syndrome (DS). In fact, Idhifa has a boxed warning for DS. Boxed warnings are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). These warnings alert doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

DS is a common serious side effect of Idhifa. It can happen after your first dose of Idhifa or within the first 5 months of treatment.

DS affects your blood cells. And if it’s not treated, it can lead to severe symptoms including organ failure and possibly, death.

There isn’t one medical test alone that doctors can use to diagnose DS. Instead, they order certain labs tests before and during Idhifa treatment to both:

  • check on the condition you’re using Idhifa to treat
  • monitor for changes in your body that may result from serious side effects including DS

To learn more about your risk for DS with Idhifa treatment, talk with your doctor.

Possible symptoms of DS

While taking Idhifa, seek emergency medical care right away if you have any new or unusual symptoms. Possible symptoms that may occur with DS include:

In addition, DS may cause other serious symptoms or health problems, too.

Management of DS

If your doctor believes you have DS from taking Idhifa, they’ll treat your condition with a corticosteroid that’s either taken by mouth or given as an injection into your vein. An example of a corticosteroid that may be used is dexamethasone (Decadron).

Your doctor will also monitor you until your DS symptoms improve. And depending on your condition, your doctor may have you stay at a hospital or stop treatment with Idhifa.

High white blood cell count

Idhifa may cause leukocytosis (increased white blood cell count). Having an elevated white blood cell count is a possible serious side effect of Idhifa.

Specifically, the drug may cause non-infectious leukocytosis. It’s called non-infectious because it doesn’t happen in response to an infection in your body. Typically, white blood cells help protect you from infection-causing germs.

Typically, having an increased white blood cell count doesn’t cause symptoms. So, to monitor for this side effect, your doctor will order blood tests to check your blood cell counts. They’ll do this before and during your Idhifa treatment. If your white blood cell counts are too high, your doctor may prescribe a drug called hydroxyurea (Droxia, Hydra, Siklos). Hydroxyurea can help lower your white blood cell count.

If your white blood cell count doesn’t go down with hydroxyurea treatment, your doctor may have you stop taking Idhifa. And they may have you restart treatment with Idhifa once your white blood cell count is within a normal range.

Gastrointestinal side effects

While you’re taking Idhifa, you may have certain gastrointestinal (GI) side effects. (GI side effects are related to your digestive system.) These are common side effects of Idhifa.

GI side effects that may occur with Idhifa include:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • diarrhea
  • decreased appetite
  • changes in taste

If you have mild GI side effects that bother you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They may recommend prescription or over-the-counter drugs to help manage certain side effects like nausea or vomiting. Or, they may recommend non-drug treatments, such as electrolyte drinks or a bland diet. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying any medications for GI side effects.

If you have severe nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea, call your doctor right away. These side effects could be serious, and they may lead to severe dehydration or other health problems. (With dehydration, you have a low level of fluid in your body.)

Allergic reaction

Allergic reaction wasn’t reported in clinical studies of Idhifa. But it may still be possible with this drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is also possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Idhifa, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

As with all medications, the cost of Idhifa can vary. To find current prices for Idhifa tablets in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

It’s important to note that you’ll have to get Idhifa from a specialty pharmacy. This type of pharmacy is authorized to carry specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively.

Before approving coverage for Idhifa, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Idhifa, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Idhifa, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Agios Pharmaceuticals, Inc., the manufacturer of Idhifa, offers ways to save on Idhifa. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, visit its program website.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Idhifa is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

The Idhifa dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on your condition and whether you have serious side effects from treatment.

Before and during Idhifa treatment, your doctor will test your blood cell counts and other lab values. Based on these results, your doctor will adjust your Idhifa dosage if needed.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. But be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Again, your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Idhifa comes as tablets that you’ll take by mouth. It’s available in two strengths:

  • 50 milligrams (mg)
  • 100 mg

Dosage for AML

The recommended dosage of Idhifa for treating a type of relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML)* is 100 mg once daily.

You’ll take this dosage for at least 6 months, unless:

  • your AML gets worse, or
  • you have unmanageable, serious side effects from Idhifa

If you have certain side effects from Idhifa, your doctor may reduce your dosage of the drug.

* Relapsed AML means that your AML has come back after being in remission (a period of time when you don’t have any AML signs or symptoms). And refractory AML means that your AML isn’t responding to your current treatment plan. For more information on AML and how Idhifa is used for it, see the “Idhifa for AML” section below.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Idhifa or vomit shortly after taking a dose, take another dose right away. Then, take your usual dose the next day as scheduled.

If you aren’t able to take another dose on the same day, wait until the next day and take Idhifa on your normal schedule. Don’t double up on doses the next day to make up for missed doses.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

For Idhifa to work as it’s meant to, it should be taken for at least 6 months.

If you and your doctor determine that Idhifa is safe and effective for you, you may take it longer than 6 months. But how long your doctor prescribes this drug will depend on your condition, whether you have serious side effects, and other factors.

Talk with your doctor about how long you’ll need to take this drug.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Idhifa to treat certain conditions. Idhifa may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Idhifa is FDA-approved to treat relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in adults. Specifically, Idhifa is used for AML with a certain gene mutation (abnormal change).

With relapsed AML, your AML has come back after being in remission (a period of time when you don’t have any AML signs or symptoms). With refractory AML, your AML isn’t responding to your current treatment plan.

About AML

AML is a type of blood cancer that’s more common in older people. It affects how your bone marrow produces all of your blood cells, including:

  • red blood cells, which carry oxygen to your tissues
  • platelets, which help to prevent or stop bleeds
  • white blood cells, which fight off infections

With AML, your white blood cells may be affected most of all. AML can also affect your lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and other organs.

AML keeps young cells called blast cells (also called myeloid cells) from maturing into fully functioning blood cells. Over time, these immature cells gather in your bone marrow and cause problems. And without mature blood cells being made, your body doesn’t have cells that are needed to keep you healthy.

For example, without mature white blood cells, you may be more prone to infections. And without mature platelets, you may be more prone to bleeding and bruising.

About AML treatment

The goal of AML treatment is to help you reach remission. During remission, you don’t have any signs or symptoms of AML. And your blood cell counts are improved.

AML treatment usually includes:

Targeted therapy drugs for AML work by finding cells with specific traits in your body. Idhifa is a targeted therapy drug. It works by finding young blast cells (called myeloid cells) that have a certain gene mutation (abnormal change).

Effectiveness for AML

In a clinical study, Idhifa was effective in treating AML. For details on the drug’s effectiveness for this condition, visit its manufacturer’s website. Or, for more clinically described study details, read Idhifa’s prescribing information.

In addition, guidelines from the National Comprehensive Cancer Network recommend Idhifa as a treatment for relapsed or refractory AML in certain adults.

Idhifa and children

It’s not known if Idhifa is safe and effective for treating children with AML. So, Idhifa isn’t approved for use in children.

Idhifa is approved to treat refractory or relapsed acute myeloid leukemia (AML)* with a certain gene mutation (abnormal change).

* Relapsed AML means that your AML has come back after being in remission (a period of time when you don’t have any AML signs or symptoms). And refractory AML means that your AML isn’t responding to your current treatment plan.

What happens in AML

AML is a type of blood cancer that mostly affects your white blood cells. White blood cells are immune cells made in your bone marrow.

Normally, stem cells in your bone marrow mature from young blast cells (called myeloid cells) into fully functioning, healthy cells. But with AML, this process doesn’t work like usual.

AML can affect all three types of blood cells. However, it usually affects your white blood cells most of all.

What happens in AML with an IDH2 mutation

Idhifa is approved to treat AML that’s affected by a mutation in an enzyme (type of protein) called IDH2.

This mutation keeps myeloid cells from maturing into fully functioning cells. Over time, too many young cells form in your bone marrow, while too few mature, healthy cells form.

What Idhifa does for AML

Idhifa works by blocking the activity of the mutated IDH2 enzyme in myeloid cells. This allows the cells to mature into fully functional blood cells that can work normally in your body. The drug also keeps too many myeloid cells from gathering in your bone marrow.

How long does it take to work?

How long Idhifa takes to improve AML depends on many factors, including:

  • your specific condition
  • other treatments you may be taking

In a clinical study of Idhifa, some people reached remission and had improved blood cell counts after taking Idhifa for 6 months. (During remission, you don’t have any signs or symptoms of AML. And your blood cell counts are improved.)

Note: Unless your AML gets worse or you have serious side effects from it, treatment with the drug is recommended for at least 6 months.

Idhifa doesn’t interact with alcohol.

However, in general, drinking too much alcohol isn’t healthy for you. And alcohol may worsen certain side effects from Idhifa, such as nausea, vomiting, and diarrhea.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe for you to drink while you’re taking Idhifa.

Idhifa can interact with several other medications. Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Idhifa and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Idhifa. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Idhifa.

Before taking Idhifa, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Idhifa may affect how your body processes certain other drugs. And this could increase your risk for side effects, including serious ones, from the other drugs.

Examples of drugs that are processed differently when taken together with Idhifa include:

  • statin drugs such as atorvastatin (Lipitor) and rosuvastatin (Crestor)
  • methotrexate (Trexall, Rasuvo, RediTrex, Otrexup)
  • rifampin (Rifadin)
  • sulfasalazine (Mesalamine)
  • cimetidine (Tagamet)
  • leflunomide (Arava)
  • digoxin (Digitek, Lanoxin)
  • diltiazem (Cartia, Cartia XT, Tiazac)
  • indinavir (Crixivan)

Idhifa and certain birth control drugs

Idhifa may increase or decrease your levels of hormones from combined hormonal forms of birth control. (Combined hormonal birth control contains both estrogen and a progestin.)

Examples of these forms of birth control include:

This interaction isn’t fully understood. However, it could make these forms of birth control less effective in preventing pregnancy.

Ask your doctor about effective forms of birth control to use while you’re taking Idhifa. For more details about this, see the “Idhifa and pregnancy” and “Idhifa and birth control” sections below.

Idhifa and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Idhifa. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Idhifa.

Idhifa and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Idhifa. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Idhifa, talk with your doctor.

Idhifa and vaccines

Idhifa treatment doesn’t affect your ability to safely receive vaccines. However, it may be unsafe to get vaccines because of your condition or other cancer treatments you’re taking.

Talk with your doctor about which vaccines are safe for you with your condition and current treatment plan.

You should take Idhifa according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

When to take

Typically, you should take Idhifa once each day. And you should try to take your dose at the same time every day.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Idhifa with food

You can take Idhifa with or without food. Just make sure to drink at least 1 cup (8 ounces) of water with your dose.

Can Idhifa be crushed, split, or chewed?

No. For Idhifa to work as it’s meant to, you shouldn’t crush, split, or chew the tablets. Instead, you should swallow Idhifa tablets whole with at least 1 cup of water.

You shouldn’t use Idhifa during pregnancy. Doing so may cause harm to a developing fetus.

Idhifa hasn’t been studied in pregnant people. But the drug did cause harm when it was given to pregnant animals in studies. Animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in people. But to be safe, it’s recommended that you don’t take Idhifa during pregnancy.

Before starting Idhifa, talk with your doctor if you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant. Your doctor will order a pregnancy test for you before having you start treatment. In order to start taking Idhifa, you must have a negative result on your pregnancy test.

While you’re taking Idhifa, you should use effective birth control to prevent pregnancy. And you should continue using birth control for at least 2 months after your final dose of Idhifa. For more information, see the “Idhifa and birth control” section below.

If you become pregnant while taking Idhifa, tell your doctor right away.

Idhifa and fertility

Idhifa may cause fertility problems in both males and females.* This means Idhifa treatment may affect your ability to reproduce.

If you’re concerned about fertility problems with this drug, talk with your doctor.

* In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refer to a person’s sex assigned at birth.

Idhifa isn’t safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about effective birth control methods.

For more details about taking Idhifa during pregnancy, see the “Idhifa and pregnancy” section above.

For females taking Idhifa

If you’re a female* who can become pregnant, you should use birth control during Idhifa treatment. And you should continue using birth control for at least 2 months after your final dose.

Keep in mind that Idhifa may make some combined hormonal forms of birth control less effective than usual. Talk with your doctor about which contraceptives are best during this time. Also, see the “Idhifa interactions” section above for more information.

* In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refer to a person’s sex assigned at birth.

For males taking Idhifa

If you have a female* partner who can become pregnant, you should use effective birth control during treatment with Idhifa. And you should continue using birth control for at least 2 months after your final dose.

Your doctor may recommend that both you and your partner use birth control during this time. To learn which contraceptive options are best, talk with your doctor.

* In this article, use of the terms “male” and “female” refer to a person’s sex assigned at birth.

It’s not known if Idhifa is safe to take while you’re breastfeeding. So, you shouldn’t breastfeed while taking Idhifa. And you should continue to avoid breastfeeding for at least 2 months after your final dose of the drug.

Talk with your doctor about healthy ways to feed your child during times that breastfeeding isn’t recommended.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Idhifa.

Is Idhifa chemotherapy?

Idhifa is used to treat a type of cancer called acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, it’s not a traditional chemotherapy drug.

With cancer, certain cells in your body multiply and grow abnormally. (Cells that are multiplying are making more cells.)

Traditional chemotherapy drugs work to treat cancer by stopping cells from multiplying. However, this effect may damage your healthy cells, too.

Idhifa, on the other hand, is a targeted cancer treatment. Targeted treatments find and target (work on) cells with specific traits, like mutations (abnormal gene changes). In Idhifa’s case, it finds certain cells in your body that have a specific mutated enzyme (type of protein).

However, Idhifa can still affect some healthy cells, and it can cause some serious side effects. But targeted therapies, including Idhifa, tend to have fewer side effects than chemotherapy drugs do.

To learn more about how Idhifa works to treat AML, see the “How Idhifa works” section above.

Will I need to have lab tests done before or while I’m taking Idhifa?

Yes. Your doctor will order certain lab tests both before and during your Idhifa treatment.

For example, before you start taking Idhifa, your doctor may order:

  • a test to confirm you have AML with a specific mutation (abnormal gene change)
  • a pregnancy test, if you’re a female who’s able to become pregnant
  • tests that measure your complete blood cell counts and other values

And during your Idhifa treatment, your doctor may order:

  • complete blood cell counts and other lab tests at least every 2 weeks for the first 3 months of treatment
  • certain lab tests as needed after the first 3 months of treatment, depending on your condition and any side effects you’re having

If I vomit after taking Idhifa, should I take another dose?

In some cases, yes. If you vomit shortly after taking your dose of Idhifa, take another dose right away.

Then the next day, you can start back on your usual dosing schedule. So, you take your prescribed Idhifa dose at the time you usually would.

If you can’t take another Idhifa dose soon after vomiting, just wait until the next day and take your normal dose at your usual time. Don’t take two doses the next day to make up the loss of drug with vomiting.

You can also call your doctor or pharmacist if you’re unsure of when to take Idhifa after vomiting.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warning: Differentiation syndrome

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Treatment with Idhifa increases your risk for differentiation syndrome (DS). This is a serious condition that affects your blood cells. If untreated, DS can lead to severe symptoms such as organ failure or possibly, death. DS has happened as soon as 1 day and up to 5 months after starting Idhifa.

Seek emergency medical care right away if you have new or unusual symptoms, such as:

  • fever
  • cough, trouble breathing, or breathing more quickly than usual
  • feeling dizzy or faint
  • fast weight gain (more than 10 pounds within 1 week)
  • swelling in your hands, feet, ankles, or lower legs
  • bone pain
  • swollen lymph nodes

In addition to these symptoms, DS may cause other serious symptoms or health problems, too.

If you have symptoms of DS, your doctor will treat your condition with a corticosteroid that’s either taken by mouth or given as an injection into your vein. An example of a corticosteroid that may be used is dexamethasone (Decadron).

Your doctor will also monitor your health until your DS symptoms improve. Depending on your condition, your doctor may have you stay at a hospital or stop treatment with Idhifa.

Other precautions

Before taking Idhifa, talk with your doctor about your health history. Idhifa may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Idhifa or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Idhifa. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. Idhifa isn’t safe to use during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Idhifa and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Idhifa isn’t safe to use while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Idhifa and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Idhifa, see the “Idhifa side effects” section above.

Don’t use more Idhifa than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Idhifa

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Idhifa from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the container. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains useable can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Here’s how to store Idhifa tablets:

  • Store it at room temperature (68°F to 77°F/20°C to 25°C).
  • Keep it in its original container.
  • Keep the container closed tightly with the drying agent inside. This helps to protect the tablets from moisture.
  • Avoid storing the container in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Idhifa and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.