Izervay is a brand-name injectable solution for the eye. It’s prescribed for geographic atrophy caused by age-related macular degeneration in adults. Izervay contains the active drug avacincaptad pegol.

Drug details

You’ll find key information about Izervay below.

  • Drug class: complement inhibitor
  • Drug form: solution given as an injection into the eye
  • Generic available? no
  • Prescription required? yes
  • Controlled substance? no
  • Year of FDA approval: 2023

Izervay is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics typically cost less than brand-name drugs.

The following information describes the dosage of Izervay that’s commonly prescribed or recommended. However, your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Izervay comes as a solution in a single-use vial. It’s available in one strength of 2 milligrams (mg) per 0.1 milliliter (mL) of solution (2 mg/0.1 mL).

Izervay is given as an injection into your eye. An eye specialist will give your injections at their office or clinic. To learn more about what to expect with Izervay treatment, visit the drug manufacturer’s website.

Dosage for geographic atrophy

Izervay is prescribed for geographic atrophy caused by age-related macular degeneration.

The typical dosage for this purpose is one injection (2 mg/0.1 mL) in the affected eye. Each injection is given once per month.

About receiving Izervay

Below you’ll find information about key dosage issues.

  • If you miss a dose. If you miss an appointment to receive your Izervay injection, call your eye specialist as soon as possible. They’ll help you reschedule the appointment.
  • Length of treatment. Izervay is meant to be a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Izervay is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely receive it for up to 12 months.
  • Length of time to work. Izervay starts working after your first injection. In clinical trials, Izervay was shown to be effective in slowing down the worsening of geographic atrophy over a 12-month period. Keep in mind that the drug is prescribed to help slow vision loss that occurs with geographic atrophy, so you might not notice if your vision stops getting worse. Your eye doctor will perform eye exams regularly to determine how well Izervay is working for you.

For general information, you can read about what to expect with .

Izervay can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while receiving Izervay. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Izervay, talk with your doctor. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Izervay, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Below is a partial list of mild side effects of Izervay. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or view Izervay’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of Izervay can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. However, if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor.

* For more information about allergic reaction and Izervay, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Izervay aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Endophthalmitis (a type of serious eye infection). Symptoms can include:
    • yellow or white eye discharge
  • Detached retina (separation of the retina from the back of the eye). Symptoms can include:
    • darkness that spreads across your vision
    • increased number of eye floaters
    • sudden, brief flashes of light in your outer vision
  • Increased risk of wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD).* Symptoms can include:
    • eye sensitivity to light
    • difficulty seeing fine details or colors
    • blurry spots in your central vision
    • seeing straight lines as crooked
  • Temporary increase in eye pressure after an Izervay injection. Symptoms can include:
    • eye pain or irritation
    • blurred vision
    • headache
  • Severe allergic reaction.†

* Wet AMD is a type of AMD that can cause rapid vision loss. Izervay is approved to help slow vision loss caused by dry AMD. To learn more about wet vs. dry AMD, see this article.
For details about allergic reaction and Izervay, see “Allergic reaction” just below.

ALLERGIC REACTION

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after receiving Izervay. This side effect wasn’t reported in clinical trials of this drug but can still occur.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Izervay, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Izervay to treat certain conditions.

Izervay for geographic atrophy

Izervay is FDA-approved to treat geographic atrophy caused by age-related macular degeneration (AMD) in adults.

AMD is an eye condition that occurs when aging damages the center of your retina. Your retina senses different types of light and is required for you to see. Damage to the center of your retina leads to loss of central vision that typically worsens over time.

Geographic atrophy is the last stage of AMD. With geographic atrophy, some areas of your retina waste away. This condition may lead to permanent loss of central vision in one or both of your eyes.

Izervay and children

Izervay is not FDA-approved for use in children. It isn’t known for sure whether the drug is effective or safe for children.

Izervay is not known to interact with other medications, herbs, supplements, foods, or alcohol. The manufacturer of Izervay didn’t list any interactions in the drug’s prescribing information.

However, this doesn’t mean that interactions won’t be recognized in the future. For example, new drugs could be approved that interact with Izervay.

Before starting Izervay treatment, talk with your doctor. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you take. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Izervay can vary. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan and your location.

Financial and insurance assistance. If you need financial support to pay for Izervay, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

A program called IZERVAY My Way is available for Izervay. For more information and to find out whether you’re eligible for support, visit the program website.

To learn more about saving money on prescriptions, check out this article.

Generic version. Izervay isn’t available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

If you have questions about the price of Izervay, talk with your doctor or insurance plan provider.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Izervay, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

For example, pegcetacoplan (Syfovre) is another drug prescribed for geographic atrophy.

If you can become pregnant, consider the following information about pregnancy, birth control, and breastfeeding.

Izervay and pregnancy

It’s not known whether Izervay should be received during pregnancy. If you’re planning a pregnancy or can become pregnant, talk with your doctor before receiving this medication.

Izervay and birth control

It’s not known whether Izervay is safe to receive during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re receiving Izervay.

Izervay and breastfeeding

It’s not known whether Izervay should be received while breastfeeding. If you’re currently breastfeeding or planning to do so, talk with your doctor before receiving this medication.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Izervay.

How does Izervay work?

Izervay treats geographic atrophy, the last stage of age-related macular degeneration (AMD). With AMD, the aging process damages the center of your retina. With geographic atrophy, some areas of your retina waste away. Over time, this leads to loss of central vision.

Having an overactive immune system is thought to play a role in the retina damage that occurs with AMD. Izervay works by blocking the activity of certain proteins involved in the immune system. By doing this, Izervay can slow the worsening of retina damage with geographic atrophy. As a result, the drug can help slow the loss of vision that occurs with this condition.

To learn more about how Izervay works, talk with your eye specialist.

Does Izervay cause long-term side effects?

It’s possible. Izervay may cause certain side effects that lead to vision loss, which may be permanent. These side effects could start during treatment and continue for a long time, even after treatment with Izervay ends.

Specifically, Izervay may cause:

If you have questions or concerns about long-term side effects of Izervay, talk with your eye specialist.

* Wet AMD is a type of AMD that can cause rapid vision loss. Izervay is approved to help slow vision loss caused by dry AMD. To learn more about wet vs. dry AMD, see this article.

Will Izervay cure my geographic atrophy?

No, Izervay will not cure geographic atrophy. At this time, there isn’t a cure for this condition.

Izervay is prescribed to help slow vision loss caused by geographic atrophy. However, the drug won’t reverse any eye damage or vision loss that’s already occurred.

If you have questions about what to expect from Izervay treatment, talk with your eye specialist.

This drug comes with several precautions.

Before starting Izervay, discuss your health history with your doctor. Izervay may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. Be sure to talk with your doctor if any of the following apply to you:

  • active infection in the eye or eye area
  • inflammation (swelling) inside the eye
  • past allergic reaction to this or a similar drug
  • pregnancy
  • breastfeeding

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Izervay, see the “Izervay side effects” section above.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.