Jatenzo is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for use in adult males* who have testosterone deficiency (low testosterone levels) caused by certain medical conditions.

Testosterone deficiency is also called male hypogonadism. This can be caused by a testicular problem or by another condition that affects how much testosterone your body makes. For more information about the causes of low testosterone, see the “Jatenzo uses” section below.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Drug details

Jatenzo contains the active drug testosterone undecanoate. It’s a type of testosterone replacement therapy and belongs to a group of medications called androgens. You may also hear Jatenzo referred to as a “testosterone booster.”

Jatenzo comes as capsules that you swallow. It’s available in three strengths: 158 milligrams (mg), 198 mg, and 237 mg.

Is Jatenzo a controlled substance?

Yes. Jatenzo contains the active drug testosterone undecanoate, which is a Schedule III controlled substance. This means that it has an accepted medical use, but it may cause physical or psychological dependence and may be misused. It also means that selling or giving this drug away to others is against the law, even if they have the same condition as you do.

The government has created special rules for how Schedule III drugs can be prescribed by a doctor and dispensed by a pharmacist. If you have questions, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Jatenzo, see the “Jatenzo uses” section below.

Jatenzo is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

As with all medications, the cost of Jatenzo can vary. To find current prices for Jatenzo capsules in your area, go to GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Jatenzo. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, talk with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Jatenzo, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Jatenzo, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Jatenzo, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Clarus Therapeutics, the manufacturer of Jatenzo, offers a program called Jatenzo Go, which may help lower the cost of the drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-269-2795 or visit the program website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Jatenzo may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Jatenzo, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Jatenzo is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Jatenzo can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Jatenzo. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Jatenzo, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Jatenzo, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Jatenzo can include:

  • diarrhea
  • heartburn
  • burping
  • swelling in your ankles, feet, or legs
  • nausea
  • headache

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Jatenzo. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Jatenzo’s medication guide.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Jatenzo aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
Jatenzo has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). To learn more, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here are some details on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Increased blood pressure

Some people taking Jatenzo may experience an increase in blood pressure. Jatenzo has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Increased blood pressure was a common side effect reported in people who took Jatenzo in clinical studies. Most people who experienced this side effect only had small blood pressure increases. However, a few people had to either start taking new medications for high blood pressure or had the dose of their current blood pressure medications increased.

However, even small increases in blood pressure can raise your risk for having a heart attack or stroke. In rare cases, a heart attack or stroke can be fatal.

Before you start taking Jatenzo, your doctor should check your heart health and blood pressure to make sure Jatenzo is safe for you. They should check your blood pressure again in 3 weeks and anytime your Jatenzo dose changes.

If you develop high blood pressure while taking Jatenzo, your doctor may prescribe new medications to treat it. If you already take blood pressure medication, your dose may need to be increased during your Jatenzo treatment.

If your blood pressure gets too high, or if you develop other heart problems while taking Jatenzo, your doctor will likely have you stop taking the drug. They may suggest another treatment for your condition.

Blood clots

Taking Jatenzo may cause blood clots in some people. Although this side effect wasn’t reported in clinical studies, it has been reported since the drug was approved.

Some people taking Jatenzo have developed blood clots in their legs or lungs. Symptoms of a blood clot in your leg may include swelling, pain, and redness or discoloration. Symptoms of a blood clot in the lung may include chest pain and shortness of breath.

Before prescribing Jatenzo, your doctor will review your health history to assess your risk for blood clots. Be sure to tell them about any medical conditions you currently have or have had in the past. If you develop symptoms of a blood clot while taking Jatenzo, call your doctor right away. Your doctor will have you stop taking Jatenzo and will treat your blood clot.

Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Once the blood clot has been treated, you and your doctor can discuss the risks and benefits of treatments for your low testosterone levels.

Lowered sperm count

It’s possible that taking Jatenzo could lower sperm count. This wasn’t reported in clinical studies of people using Jatenzo. However, lower sperm count has been reported in people using other testosterone replacement treatments. Based on how Jatenzo works, it could also cause lowered sperm count.

People using testosterone replacement treatments have also experienced a reduction in fertility (the natural ability to have a child). This may also happen with Jatenzo. You and your doctor should discuss this risk before you start taking Jatenzo. Depending on your situation, your doctor may recommend a different treatment for your condition.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Jatenzo.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Jatenzo, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Jatenzo dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • how well Jatenzo works at increasing your testosterone levels
  • side effects you may have from taking Jatenzo

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Jatenzo comes as capsules that you swallow. It’s available in three strengths:

  • 158 (milligrams) mg
  • 198 mg
  • 237 mg

Dosage for testosterone replacement therapy

As testosterone replacement therapy, the recommended starting dose of Jatenzo is 237 mg taken twice per day. You’ll take one dose in the morning and one in the evening.

Your doctor will wait at least 7 days after your first dose of Jatenzo before checking your testosterone levels again. They’ll also periodically check these levels while you’re taking Jatenzo.

The minimum Jatenzo dose is 158 mg taken twice a day, and the maximum dose is 396 mg taken twice a day.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss your Jatenzo dose, take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next dose, just skip the missed dose and take your next dose at the scheduled time. You should not take two doses of Jatenzo at once to make up for a missed dose. Doing so can raise your risk for side effects from the medication.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Yes, Jatenzo is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor decide that Jatenzo is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Jatenzo to treat certain conditions. Jatenzo may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Jatenzo for testosterone replacement therapy

Jatenzo is FDA-approved for use in adult males* with testosterone deficiency (low testosterone levels) caused by certain medical conditions.

Testosterone deficiency is also referred to as male hypogonadism. This can be caused by primary hypogonadism (a testicular problem) or by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (another condition that affects how much testosterone your body makes). Both of these types of hypogonadism may be present from birth, or they may be conditions you develop over time.

For more information on low testosterone, including causes and treatments, see Medical News Today’s men’s health hub.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Effectiveness for testosterone replacement therapy

Clinical studies showed that Jatenzo is effective at raising testosterone levels to a normal range in males* when used as testosterone replacement therapy (TRT). For more information on how Jatenzo performed in these studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Guidelines by the American Urological Association recommend testosterone undecanoate, the active drug in Jatenzo, as a treatment option for testosterone deficiency.

If you have questions about how well Jatenzo works as TRT, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Jatenzo and children

Jatenzo is only approved for use in adults. The drug is not approved for use in people ages 18 years and younger, and the drug hasn’t been studied in this population. So it is not known whether Jatenzo is safe or effective in children.

There are no known interactions between alcohol and Jatenzo.

However, alcohol is known to decrease testosterone levels. Although alcohol won’t directly interact with Jatenzo, consuming alcohol may cause your testosterone levels to remain low.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much may be safe for you to drink while taking Jatenzo.

Jatenzo can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Jatenzo and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Jatenzo. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Jatenzo.

Before taking Jatenzo, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Types of medications that may interact with Jatenzo include:

  • Insulin. Testosterone replacement therapies (TRTs), including Jatenzo, may change how your body responds to insulin. Jatenzo could also cause changes in your blood sugar. You may need a lower dose of insulin while taking Jatenzo to avoid hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
  • Warfarin. Using TRTs, including Jatenzo, can affect how well warfarin (Coumadin) works to prevent blood clots. The risk for this interaction may be higher when you first start taking or stop using Jatenzo, but it can happen anytime while you’re using the drug. Your doctor may want to monitor your international normalized ratio (INR) more often if you’re taking warfarin and Jatenzo together. (An INR level is a calculated number that estimates your risk for bleeding or clotting.)
  • Corticosteroids. Using Jatenzo with corticosteroids such as prednisone or dexamethasone may raise your risk for fluid retention (swelling). People with liver, heart, or kidney problems may have a higher risk for this side effect. If you need to use a corticosteroid medication with Jatenzo, your doctor will closely monitor you for fluid retention during your treatment.
  • Medications that may raise your blood pressure. Certain medications, including some over-the-counter cold and pain medications, can raise your blood pressure. Jatenzo can also raise your blood pressure, so taking it with these other drugs may increase your risk for high blood pressure. Be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you take before you begin using Jatenzo. Examples of other medications than can raise your blood pressure include:
    • pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)
    • tacrolimus (Prograf, Astagraf XL)
    • phentermine (Adipex-P, Lomaira)

Jatenzo and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Jatenzo. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Jatenzo.

Jatenzo and foods or beverages

Caffeine, which is found in coffee as well as other foods and supplements, may cause small increases in blood pressure. It isn’t known what effect, if any, this could have in someone taking Jatenzo. If you consume caffeine in any way, talk with your doctor about how much may be safe for you to have while taking Jatenzo.

If you have any questions about consuming certain foods or beverages with Jatenzo, talk with your doctor.

You should take Jatenzo according to your doctor’s or healthcare professional’s instructions.

Jatenzo comes as capsules that you swallow.

When to take

You’ll likely take Jatenzo twice a day: once in the morning and once in the evening.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Jatenzo with food

You should take Jatenzo with food. This helps your body absorb Jatenzo.

Can Jatenzo be crushed, split, or chewed?

No, Jatenzo capsules should not be crushed, split, or chewed. This could affect how your body absorbs the medication, and it may increase your risk for side effects. It could also make Jatenzo less effective.

If you have trouble swallowing Jatenzo capsules, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. There are other types of testosterone replacement therapy that come in forms other than capsules.

Jatenzo is used in adult males* who have testosterone deficiency (low testosterone levels) caused by certain medical conditions.

Testosterone deficiency is also referred to as male hypogonadism. This can be caused by primary hypogonadism (a testicular problem) or by hypogonadotropic hypogonadism (another condition that affects how much testosterone your body makes). Both of these types of hypogonadism may be present from birth, or they may be conditions you develop over time.

Jatenzo contains the active drug testosterone undecanoate. Jatenzo treats testosterone deficiency by replacing the testosterone that your body isn’t making naturally.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

How long does it take to work?

Jatenzo begins working as soon as you take your first dose. However, it can take some time before your testosterone levels start to rise.

Your doctor will wait at least 7 days after your first dose before checking your testosterone levels again. Some people may see an increase after only a few days or weeks. But for other people, it could take up to 4 months before testosterone levels are in a range considered normal. How long Jatenzo takes to work may depend on your testosterone levels when you start using the drug.

If you have questions about whether Jatenzo is working for you, talk with your doctor. They can review your lab test results with you and discuss when you should start seeing a difference.

Jatenzo is not approved for use in females* and is not safe to take during pregnancy. This is because testosterone undecanoate (the active drug in Jatenzo) has the potential to harm a fetus.

Jatenzo and fertility

Some males* taking testosterone replacement therapy have experienced a reduction in fertility (the natural ability to have a child). Reduced fertility is also possible with Jatenzo treatment. You and your doctor should discuss this risk before you start taking Jatenzo. Depending on your situation, your doctor may recommend a different treatment for your condition.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Jatenzo is not approved for use in females,* and it should not be used while breastfeeding. If you have questions, talk with your doctor.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Jatenzo.

Will I need to have lab tests done while I’m taking Jatenzo?

Yes, there are lab tests you’ll need to have done during your Jatenzo treatment. See the chart below for details.

Lab testWhy it’s doneHow often you’ll have it done
HematocritJatenzo may increase your red blood cell count, which can raise your risk for certain side effects, such as heart attack or stroke.Every 3 months
Lipid profileTestosterone therapy, including Jatenzo, may affect your lipid (fat) blood levels, including total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL, or “bad”) cholesterol.Periodically
Testosterone blood levelsTo check how well Jatenzo is working to raise your testosterone levels.Periodically. You may need more testing when you first start taking Jatenzo, until you and your doctor find the dose that works best for you.
Prostate-specific antigen (PSA)Although rare, Jatenzo can increase your risk for prostate cancer. Watching your PSA level helps your doctor monitor for this side effect.Periodically. Your doctor will determine the best testing schedule for you.

In addition to the tests above, people who have cancer and are at risk for hypercalcemia (high calcium levels) will have their blood calcium measured periodically.

If you have questions about lab tests you’ll need while taking Jatenzo, talk with your doctor.

Can Jatenzo be used by older people?

It isn’t known whether Jatenzo is safe or effective for older people to use. No one ages 65 years and older was included in the drug’s clinical studies.

It’s important to note that Jatenzo can cause some side effects that older adults may have a higher risk for. These side effects can include:

  • increased risk for prostate cancer
  • cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems
  • new cases of enlarged prostate
  • worsening symptoms of benign prostatic hypertrophy in people who already have this condition

For these reasons, it’s important that older people discuss the risks and benefits of using Jatenzo with their doctor before starting treatment. Your doctor can help determine whether Jatenzo is a safe option for you.

Is Jatenzo used for bodybuilding?

No, Jatenzo is not approved for use in bodybuilding. However, some people may misuse drugs containing testosterone, such as Jatenzo, for this purpose.

Misuse of medications containing testosterone, including Jatenzo, may lead to serious side effects. Examples of these side effects include:

Some people may misuse testosterone drugs such as Jatenzo by taking higher doses than those recommended by their doctor. Doing so can lead to physical dependence and withdrawal symptoms if you stop taking the drug. For more information, see the “Withdrawal and dependence” section below.

Remember that Jatenzo is a controlled substance, which means its use is closely regulated by the federal government to prevent possible misuse. It also means that selling or giving this drug away to others is against the law, even if they have the same condition as you.

You should not take Jatenzo for anything other than the condition your doctor prescribes it to treat. Take the drug exactly as your doctor prescribes, at only the dose they recommend.

If you have questions or concerns about Jatenzo misuse, talk with your doctor.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warning: Increased blood pressure

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Jatenzo may raise your blood pressure. This can increase your risk for serious cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems, including stroke or heart attack that doesn’t lead to death. In rare cases, it could also lead to cardiovascular death (death due to a heart or blood vessel problem). People with a history of heart attack or stroke, or who have a high risk for heart attack or stroke, may be more likely to experience these side effects from Jatenzo.

Your doctor will monitor your blood pressure while you’re taking Jatenzo. You may need to use blood pressure medications if your blood pressure increases during your treatment. If you’re already being treated for high blood pressure, you may need new medications or higher doses of your current medications. If the drug can’t keep your blood pressure from rising during your Jatenzo treatment, your doctor may have you stop taking it.

Other precautions

Before taking Jatenzo, talk with your doctor about your health history. Jatenzo may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Heart condition. Jatenzo can raise your risk for cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems, such as hypertension, stroke, and heart attack. People who already have a heart condition, such as a previous heart attack, may be at higher risk for cardiovascular problems from Jatenzo. It’s important to talk with your doctor about your heart health, and any heart conditions you may have, before you take this medication. They can help determine if Jatenzo is a safe treatment for you.
  • High red blood cell count. Taking Jatenzo may cause your red blood cell count to increase. A high red blood cell count may raise your risk for blood clots during your Jatenzo treatment. People who already have high red blood cell counts may have a higher risk for blood clots. Before you use Jatenzo, talk with your doctor if you have a high red blood cell count.
  • Urinary problems caused by an enlarged prostate. Testosterone replacement therapies such as Jatenzo can worsen an enlarged prostate in people who already have this condition. If you have an enlarged prostate, such as that caused by benign prostatic hypertrophy, taking Jatenzo may worsen symptoms of this condition. If you have urinary problems caused by an enlarged prostate, talk with your doctor about whether Jatenzo is safe for you to take.
  • Liver or kidney problems. Jatenzo can cause certain side effects, such as hepatitis or edema. People with liver or kidney problems, such as hepatitis or chronic kidney disease, may have a higher risk for these side effects. If you have any liver or kidney problems, talk with your doctor before you begin using Jatenzo.
  • Mental health conditions. Although not common, taking Jatenzo may cause depression or suicidal thoughts or behaviors. If you have existing mental health conditions, you may have a higher risk for this side effect. So before you start taking Jatenzo, it’s important to talk with your doctor about any mental health conditions you have, such as anxiety or depression.
  • Sleep apnea, obesity, or lung problems. Treatment with Jatenzo may raise your risk for sleep apnea. People with a higher risk for sleep apnea while using Jatenzo include those who already have sleep apnea, people with lung problems such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or asthma, or people with a weight that classifies them as obese. If any of these factors apply to you, ask your doctor about your risk for sleep apnea and whether Jatenzo is safe for you.
  • Age-related hypogonadism (low testosterone). Jatenzo should not be prescribed to treat low testosterone caused by aging rather than a genetic cause or other health condition. This is because Jatenzo hasn’t been studied for treating testosterone deficiency due to aging. Using Jatenzo to treat age-related low testosterone can raise your risk for cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems, including heart attack or stroke. If you have low testosterone caused by aging, talk with your doctor about possible treatment options.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Jatenzo or any of its ingredients, you should not take Jatenzo. Ask your doctor about other medications that might be better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. You should not use Jatenzo while pregnant. For more information, see the “Jatenzo and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Jatenzo should not be used while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Jatenzo and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Jatenzo, see the “Jatenzo side effects” section above.

Do not use more Jatenzo than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Jatenzo

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When used for approved conditions at approved doses, testosterone drugs such as Jatenzo have not been shown to cause dependence. With dependence, your body needs the drug to function properly.

If you take more than the recommended maximum dose of Jatenzo, you could experience withdrawal symptoms. These symptoms can occur if you stop taking the drug or if your dose is lowered. Examples of withdrawal symptoms can include:

It’s important that you only use Jatenzo as directed by your doctor. Never take more than the dose prescribed for you. If you have questions about your dose or whether the drug is working for you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

When you get Jatenzo from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Jatenzo capsules should be stored at room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C) in a tightly sealed container away from light. For short periods of time, such as when traveling, you may store Jatenzo at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C). You should return the medication to room temperature as soon as possible. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Jatenzo and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.