Klonopin is a prescription brand-name medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat the following conditions:

  • Certain seizure disorders in adults and children of all ages. A seizure disorder is a condition in which you have several seizures. Klonopin treats:
  • Panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in adults. Panic disorder is a type of mental health condition that causes repeated panic attacks. Agoraphobia is a fear of being in places from which it may be hard to leave.

Drug details

Klonopin contains the active drug clonazepam. Klonopin belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines.

Klonopin comes as oral tablets. They’re available in three strengths: 0.5 milligrams (mg), 1 mg, and 2 mg.

Is Klonopin a controlled substance?

Yes, Klonopin is a controlled substance. A controlled substance is a drug that’s regulated by the government because it can lead to misuse or addiction.

Klonopin contains the active drug clonazepam, which is classified as a Schedule IV (four) drug by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This means that the drug has acceptable medical uses, but it has the risks mentioned above.

For more information, see the “Klonopin withdrawal and dependence” section below.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Klonopin, see the “Klonopin uses” section below.

Klonopin is a brand-name drug that contains the active drug clonazepam. This active drug is also available as a generic medication. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication.

The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

If you’re interested in taking the generic form of Klonopin, talk with your doctor. They can tell you if it comes in forms and strengths that can be used for your condition.

The Klonopin dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • your age
  • weight (for children)
  • the type and severity of the condition you’re taking Klonopin to treat
  • other medical conditions you may have

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. They may adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. They’ll ultimately prescribe the lowest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Klonopin comes as oral tablets. They’re available in three strengths: 0.5 milligrams (mg), 1.0 mg, and 2.0 mg.

Be sure to take only the dosage of Klonopin that your doctor prescribes.

Dosage for seizure disorders

To treat certain seizure disorders in adults, you’ll likely take a 0.5-mg dose of Klonopin three times per day. If your seizures are not well managed after 3 days, your doctor may increase your dose by 0.5 mg to 1 mg. They’ll continue adjusting your dose every 3 days or so until your seizures are well managed.

The maximum dosage (highest dose) of Klonopin for seizure disorders in adults is a total of 20 mg per day. The drug is divided into doses throughout the day. Be sure to follow your doctor’s instructions about how many hours between doses are safe for you.

Dosage for panic disorder

To treat panic disorder, you’ll likely take 0.25 mg of Klonopin two times per day. If your panic disorder is not well managed after 3 days, your doctor may increase your dosage to 0.5 mg two times per day. Most people find that their panic disorder is well managed with this dosage.

However, your doctor may continue to make dosage adjustments until they find what works for you. The maximum dosage of Klonopin for panic disorder is 4 mg per day.

Children’s dosage

To treat seizures in children, the dosage of Klonopin depends on your child’s age and weight:

  • For children ages 11 to 17 years, the recommended dosage is the same as for adults. See “Dosage for seizure disorders” above.
  • For children ages 10 years and younger or children who weigh 30 kilograms (about 66 pounds) or less, the dosage is based on their weight. The typical starting dosage is 0.01 to 0.03 milligrams per kilogram (mg/kg) of body weight per day. This is divided into two or three doses per day. Your child’s doctor can determine the right dosage.

Your child’s doctor may continue to adjust the dose until the seizure disorder is well managed.

Klonopin is not approved to treat panic disorder in children. So there is no approved children’s dosage for this use.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Klonopin, you should take it as soon as possible. But if it’s almost time for your next scheduled dose, you should skip the missed dose and take your next dose as usual. You should not take extra doses to make up for a missed dose. Taking extra doses may increase your risk for side effects.*

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

* For more information about side effects, see the “Klonopin side effects” section above.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

When you’re considering Klonopin as a treatment option, you may be wondering whether you’ll need to take Klonopin for life.

Klonopin can be a short-term or long-term treatment. Keep in mind that the long-term effectiveness of Klonopin hasn’t been studied for longer than 9 weeks.

Because of this, it’s important that you and your doctor discuss from time to time whether you need to continue Klonopin treatment. They may suggest slowly reducing your dosage to see if your seizures or panic attacks can be managed with less medication. Or your doctor may recommend you take a different drug that allows your condition to be treated without Klonopin.

How long Klonopin is used varies. Some people find that long-term use of low-dose Klonopin is safe and effective for their condition. If you and your doctor determine that there are no other effective treatment options available, it’s likely you’ll take Klonopin long term.

Klonopin can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking the drug. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Klonopin, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Klonopin, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Klonopin can include:

Some of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Klonopin. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or see Klonopin’s medication guide.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Klonopin aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Side effect details” section below.
Klonopin has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. The warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.
‡ For more information about this side effect, , see the “Klonopin withdrawal and dependence” section below.
§ For more information about this side effect, see the “Klonopin interactions” section below.

Side effects in children

Klonopin may cause side effects in children similar to those in adults.

However, it’s possible for children to develop paradoxical reactions while taking Klonopin. The term “paradoxical” means opposite. So instead of causing drowsiness and fatigue (as in adults), Klonopin may cause increased excitement in children. This may include being more talkative or emotional than usual and having more energy.

If you have any questions about Klonopin’s side effects in your child, talk with their doctor.

Side effect details

Here are some details on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Risk of misuse and addiction

Taking Klonopin may cause an addiction to the drug, even if it’s taken as prescribed. Taking Klonopin can also lead to misuse, which may increase the risk of overdose and, in some cases, death. Klonopin has a boxed warning for these risks. A boxed warning is the most serious type of warning from the FDA. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Misuse means a drug is used in a way other than how it’s prescribed. Some examples of misusing Klonopin include crushing and snorting the tablets or mixing them with other drugs in an effort to feel “high.”

Misuse side effects from Klonopin can include:

To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see Klonopin’s prescribing information.

If you’ve had problems with drug misuse or addiction in the past, it’s important to talk with your doctor about it. They can work with you to find a treatment that’s best for you.

Sexual side effects

Sexual side effects from Klonopin aren’t common, but they can occur. Sexual side effects can include:

Sexual problems were reported in people who took Klonopin in clinical studies. These side effects may be more likely in people taking high doses of Klonopin.

To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see Klonopin’s prescribing information.

If you have sexual side effects with Klonopin, talk with your doctor. They may adjust your dosage or suggest other treatments, such as sildenafil (Viagra).

Low blood pressure

When hypotension (low blood pressure) occurred with Klonopin in clinical studies, it was usually due to a condition called orthostatic hypotension. With orthostatic hypotension, your blood pressure drops quickly when you stand up, which may cause you to feel dizzy. The condition wasn’t commonly reported.

Hypotension can also be a symptom of overdose. To learn more, see the “Klonopin overdose” section below.

To find out how often orthostatic hypotension occurred in clinical studies, see Klonopin’s prescribing information.

Symptoms of orthostatic hypotension can include:

  • fainting
  • lightheadedness or feeling dizzy
  • nausea
  • fatigue (lack of energy)

If you have any of these symptoms while taking Klonopin, talk with your doctor. They may want to see whether Klonopin or something else is the cause. If the orthostatic hypotension is due to the drug, your doctor may adjust your dosage or treatment plan.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Klonopin.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Klonopin, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Klonopin.

Can Klonopin be used to treat anxiety? If so, what’s the dosage for anxiety?

Klonopin isn’t specifically approved to treat anxiety. But the drug is approved to treat panic disorder, which is a type of anxiety disorder.

With panic disorder, the thought of having a panic attack may increase anxiety. Klonopin may help ease anxiety that’s related to panic disorder.

How long Klonopin works for anxiety related to panic disorder depends on several factors, including how severe your symptoms are. To learn more, including information about dosage, talk with your doctor.

What is Klonopin’s dosage for sleep?

Klonopin is not approved to treat sleep problems such as insomnia (trouble falling asleep or staying asleep). But the drug may be used off-label for sleep problems. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Also, sleepiness is a common side effect of Klonopin, especially when you first start treatment.

If you’d like to learn more about taking Klonopin for sleep problems, including what the dosage would be, talk with your doctor.

Is Klonopin a narcotic? Will it make you ‘high’?

No, Klonopin is not a narcotic (a powerful pain reliever also known as an opioid). And misusing the drug may make you feel “high.”

Narcotics are opioid analgesic (painkiller) drugs used to relieve severe pain. Examples include:

Benzodiazepines, such as Klonopin, are not used to treat pain.

Klonopin contains the drug clonazepam, which is a Schedule IV controlled substance. A controlled substance is a drug that’s regulated by the government because it can lead to misuse or addiction.

Some people may confuse the term “narcotic” with “controlled substance.” But they are not the same, and not all controlled substances are narcotics.

If you have other questions about Klonopin, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Is Klonopin used for depression or alcohol withdrawal?

Klonopin is not approved to treat alcohol withdrawal or depression. But the drug may be used off-label to treat alcohol withdrawal. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Klonopin is a type of drug called a benzodiazepine. Other benzodiazepines are more commonly used to treat alcohol withdrawal syndrome. Examples of these drugs include chlordiazepoxide (Librium), diazepam (Valium), and lorazepam (Ativan).

To learn more about Klonopin’s uses as well as treatments for alcohol withdrawal and depression, talk with your doctor.

How long does Klonopin stay in your urine?

Klonopin may stay in your urine for about 1 month after your last dose.

In one study, traces of clonazepam (the active drug in Klonopin) were detected in urine tests for 3 to 4 weeks after a single dose.

Klonopin contains the drug clonazepam, which belongs to a class of drugs called benzodiazepines.

Clonazepam and other benzodiazepines work by increasing the levels of a chemical called gamma-aminobutyric acid. This chemical sends signals between brain cells. These drugs are thought to make brain cells less sensitive to stimulation, producing a calming effect.

This calming action makes clonazepam an effective option for preventing and treating seizures or panic attacks.

How long does it take to work?

Klonopin typically produces a calming effect within 1 to 4 hours. Klonopin’s effects last longer than some other benzodiazepines. The half-life of Klonopin is 30 to 40 hours. A drug’s half-life is the amount of time that it takes for the body to get rid of half a dose.

It may take a few days or weeks for you and your doctor to find the dosage that works for you.

How long does it stay in your system?

Klonopin’s effects start to wear off after a few hours, but the drug stays in your body for 6 to 9 days. Keep in mind that traces of the drug can be detected in certain urine tests for up to 1 month after your last dose.

Other drugs are available that can treat seizure disorders or panic disorder. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Klonopin, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Alternatives for seizure disorders

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat seizure disorders include:

  • other benzodiazepines, such as:
  • seizure drugs, such as:
    • carbamazepine (Tegretol)
    • gabapentin (Neurontin)
    • lamotrigine (Lamictal)
    • levetiracetam (Keppra)
    • oxcarbazepine (Trileptal, Oxtellar XR)

Alternatives for panic disorder

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat panic disorder include:

Klonopin can cause withdrawal and physical dependence. In fact, the drug has a boxed warning for these risks. A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Taking Klonopin can lead to physical dependence. Klonopin treatment can also lead to withdrawal if you stop taking the drug suddenly. These effects can happen especially if you take the drug often, long term, or in high dosages before stopping treatment.

To help prevent withdrawal, your doctor will typically taper off (gradually reduce) your Klonopin dosage very slowly, usually over several weeks or months. For example, you doctor may reduce your dosage by 0.25 milligrams (mg) each week before having you stop Klonopin treatment completely.

Withdrawal symptoms

Even short-term use of Klonopin (as little as 3 to 6 weeks) at prescribed dosages can cause physical dependence and withdrawal.

The withdrawal timeline for Klonopin isn’t the same for everyone. The severity of the withdrawal can also vary. But it’s common to experience withdrawal in phases.

The first phase is acute (short-term) withdrawal. Symptoms may start within 1 to 3 days of your last dose. Acute withdrawal from Klonopin may last for a few weeks.

Acute withdrawal symptoms can range from mild to severe and may include:

After acute withdrawal, it’s common to develop a protracted (lengthened) phase of withdrawal. This second phase can last for weeks or months. Some symptoms may happen for more than 12 months.

Protracted withdrawal symptoms can include:

  • anxiety
  • problems with thinking and memory
  • changes in mood, such as depression
  • insomnia
  • numbness, prickling, or the feeling of something crawling on your skin
  • muscle weakness or twitching
  • tinnitus (ringing in your ears)

You should not suddenly stop taking Klonopin. If you’re thinking about stopping treatment with the drug, talk with your doctor first.

You may wonder how Klonopin compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. To find out how clonazepam (the active drug in Klonopin) compares with Xanax (alprazolam), see this article.

Taking Klonopin and drinking alcohol can increase your risk for dangerous side effects. These include excessive sleepiness, respiratory depression (slowed, shallow breathing), coma, and in some cases, death.

The use of drugs called benzodiazepines, including Klonopin, can lead to misuse and physical dependence.* Consuming alcohol with benzodiazepines increases these risks.

The safest option is to avoid drinking alcohol while taking Klonopin. Another option is to talk with your doctor. They can advise you on whether it’s safe to consume any alcohol during your Klonopin treatment.

* Klonopin has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. The warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous. For more information, see the “Klonopin withdrawal and dependence” section below.

Klonopin can interact with several other medications.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase the number of side effects or make them more severe.

Klonopin and other medications

Below is a list of some medications that can interact with Klonopin. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Klonopin.

Before taking Klonopin, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

Some drugs in this list are commonly prescribed to treat the same conditions as Klonopin. If your doctor prescribes a drug that may interact with Klonopin, they’ll typically adjust your dosage to reduce the risk of harmful effects. They may also monitor you more closely during your treatment.

Central nervous system (CNS) depressants. Klonopin, which is a type of drug called a benzodiazepine, can cause CNS depression. So it’s known as a CNS depressant.

CNS depressants can cause sleepiness and can impair your ability to think, react, and move quickly. Less commonly, CNS depressants can cause respiratory depression (slowed, shallow breathing).

Taking Klonopin with other CNS depressants raises your risk for these serious side effects. You and your doctor should discuss the risks and review your treatment plan. If your doctor prescribes more than one CNS depressant for you, they’ll monitor you more closely than usual.

Examples of CNS depressant drugs include:

  • Opioids. Klonopin has a boxed warning* for the risk of serious injury or death if taken with opioids. These risks can include severe drowsiness, respiratory depression (slowed, shallow breathing), and coma. You should not take Klonopin with an opioid unless you and your doctor have discussed the risks and there are no other available treatment options. If your doctor prescribes Klonopin with an opioid, they will monitor you closely. Some examples of opioids include:
    • codeine
  • Sleep aids. Drugs used to treat insomnia (trouble falling asleep or staying asleep) can increase your risk of CNS depression with Klonopin. Examples of sleep aids include:
    • eszopiclone (Lunesta)
    • suvorexant (Belsomra)
    • zolpidem (Ambien)
  • Barbiturates. These drugs are used to treat seizure disorders or migraine. Barbiturates can raise your risk of CNS depression with Klonopin. Examples of barbiturates include:
    • butalbital (Fioricet)
    • phenobarbital (Luminal)
  • Certain antidepressants. The combination of certain antidepressants with Klonopin may increase your risk of CNS and respiratory depression. Some antidepressants may also raise your risk of seizures. Examples of these antidepressants include:
  • Seizure drugs. These drugs may increase the risk of CNS and respiratory depression when used in combination with Klonopin. Antiepileptic drugs can also raise your risk of impaired thinking and movement. Examples of these drugs include:
    • carbamazepine (Tegretol)
    • lamotrigine (Lamictal)
    • levetiracetam (Keppra)
    • oxcarbazepine (Trileptal, Oxtellar XR)

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* Klonopin has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. The warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Klonopin and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Klonopin. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Klonopin.

Klonopin and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Klonopin. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Klonopin, talk with your doctor.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Klonopin to treat certain conditions. Klonopin may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means taking a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Klonopin for seizure disorders

Klonopin is FDA-approved to treat certain seizure disorders in adults and children of all ages. A seizure disorder is a condition in which you have several seizures. Klonopin treats:

If you have absence seizures and seizure drugs called succinimides, such as ethosuximide, haven’t worked for you, Klonopin may help.

Seizures explained

Seizure disorders are also known as epilepsy. Seizures are the result of disturbances in the brain’s electrical activity.

Symptoms of atonic seizures may include:

  • eyelid drooping
  • head nodding
  • sudden limpness in one or more parts of the body

Symptoms of myoclonic seizures may include:

  • unusual clumsiness
  • rhythmic movements
  • quick jerking, often after waking up

Symptoms of absence seizures may include:

  • fluttering eyelids
  • leaning forward or backward
  • stopping speech in the middle of a sentence

Effectiveness for seizure disorders

Klonopin has been shown to be an effective treatment for certain seizure disorders. For information on how the drug performed in clinical studies, see Klonopin’s prescribing information.

Klonopin for panic disorder

Klonopin is FDA-approved to treat panic disorder with or without agoraphobia in adults.

Panic disorder is a type of mental health condition. Specifically, it’s a kind of anxiety disorder. With panic disorder, you have repeating panic attacks.

Panic attacks are sudden episodes of intense fear that can cause physical symptoms. Panic attack symptoms can start suddenly and may become more intense over 10 minutes or so. These symptoms can include:

People with panic disorder sometimes develop agoraphobia, which is a fear of public places or situations from which it may be hard to leave. For example, if you have agoraphobia, you may not be able to leave your home without having a panic attack.

Effectiveness for panic disorder

Klonopin has been shown to be an effective treatment for panic disorder. For information on how the drug performed in clinical studies, see Klonopin’s prescribing information.

Klonopin and children

Klonopin is FDA-approved to treat certain seizure disorders in children of all ages. For details on this use, see “Klonopin for seizure disorders” above. The drug is not approved to treat panic disorder in children.

Your doctor may prescribe Klonopin as part of a treatment plan that includes other medications for your condition.

If you have a seizure disorder, your doctor may recommend that you take a seizure drug with Klonopin. If you have panic disorder, they may advise you to take an antidepressant or an antipsychotic drug with Klonopin.

Klonopin is typically known as an add-on medication, which increases the ability of all the drugs to manage your seizures or panic disorder.

If you have questions about the use of other drugs with Klonopin, talk with your doctor.

* For more information about side effects, see the “Klonopin side effects” section above.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warnings. These are the most serious warnings from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

  • Taking Klonopin with opioid drugs can cause dangerous side effects. These can include severe drowsiness, respiratory depression (slowed, shallow breathing), coma, and death. If your doctor prescribes Klonopin with an opioid, they will monitor you closely. Examples of opioids include codeine, oxycodone, and tramadol.
  • Misuse and addiction. Taking this drug can lead to misuse or addiction. Misuse of Klonopin increases your risk of overdose and, in some cases, death. An example of drug misuse is crushing and snorting Klonopin tablets.
  • Dependence and withdrawal. Taking Klonopin, even as prescribed, can lead to physical dependence and withdrawal if you stop taking the drug suddenly. Withdrawal can cause harmful effects and can be life threatening.

For more information on these warnings, see “Side effect details” in the “Klonopin side effects” section above.

Other precautions

Before taking Klonopin, talk with your doctor about your health history. Klonopin may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Liver or kidney problems. If you have liver or kidney problems, tell your doctor before you start taking Klonopin. Your body may not be able to metabolize (break down) Klonopin properly. If the drug stays in your system longer than usual, it could lead to increases in the number and severity of side effects. Your doctor may recommend that you take a decreased dose of Klonopin or suggest a different treatment option that’s safe for you.
  • Breathing problems. Klonopin can cause respiratory depression (slowed, shallow breathing) as a rare but serious side effect. If you already have breathing problems, such as asthma or sleep apnea, you may have an increased risk for this side effect. Before starting Klonopin treatment, be sure to talk with your doctor about any lung or breathing problems that you have.
  • Glaucoma. If you have acute narrow angle glaucoma, you should not take Klonopin. However, the drug may be used in people with open angle glaucoma as long as it’s currently being managed. Talk with your doctor about whether Klonopin is right for you.
  • Ages 65 years or older. Certain side effects of Klonopin can be more severe in older adults than in younger people. These side effects may include sleepiness, dizziness, trouble walking, lack of coordination, and thinking and memory problems. If your doctor prescribes Klonopin for you, it’ll likely be a low dosage, and they’ll monitor you closely for side effects.
  • Depression. Rarely, Klonopin can increase your risk of worsening depression or suicidal thoughts or actions. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have or had depression. They’ll monitor you more carefully than usual if you take Klonopin.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Klonopin or any of its ingredients, you should not take Klonopin. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. Klonopin is not recommended during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Klonopin and pregnancy” section below.
  • Breastfeeding. Klonopin is not recommended while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Klonopin and breastfeeding” section below.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Klonopin, see the “Klonopin side effects” section above.

Taking more than the recommended dosage of Klonopin can lead to serious side effects.

Do not take more Klonopin than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

  • excessive sleepiness
  • confusion
  • reduced reflexes
  • low blood pressure
  • coma

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

As with all medications, the cost of Klonopin can vary. To find current prices for Klonopin tablets in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Klonopin. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Klonopin, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure whether you’ll need to get prior authorization for Klonopin, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Klonopin, help may be available.

For more information about possible cost assistance for Klonopin, visit Medicine Assistance Tool’s website. Also, check with your doctor or pharmacist about ways to save on this medication.

Mail-order pharmacies

Klonopin may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Klonopin, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Klonopin is available in a generic form called clonazepam. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. And generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs. To find out how the cost of clonazepam compares with the cost of Klonopin, visit GoodRx.com.

If your doctor has prescribed Klonopin and you’re interested in taking clonazepam instead, talk with your doctor. They may have a preference for one version or the other. You’ll also need to check your insurance plan, as it may only cover one or the other.

You should take Klonopin according to the instructions from your doctor or other healthcare professional.

Klonopin comes as oral tablets that you swallow with water.

When to take

If you take one dose of Klonopin per day, it’s best to take it at bedtime.

Klonopin is usually taken in divided doses. This means that you’ll likely take two, three, or more doses, spaced throughout the day. Be sure to take Klonopin according to your doctor’s instructions.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Klonopin with food

You may take this drug with or without food.

Can Klonopin be crushed, split, or chewed?

Maybe. The manufacturer of Klonopin tablets recommends that you swallow them whole with water. If you have trouble swallowing Klonopin, talk with your pharmacist. They may be able to split the tablets or suggest an alternative medication available in a liquid form.

Klonopin use is not recommended during pregnancy. Harmful effects can occur if the drug is taken while pregnant.

In clinical studies, pregnant females* who took drugs called benzodiazepines during pregnancy had children who experienced various side effects, such as trouble feeding. The children also experienced drug dependence and withdrawal. (Klonopin is a type of benzodiazepine.)

Pregnancy registry

A pregnancy registry is available for females* with epilepsy who use Klonopin while pregnant. This registry collects information on the safety of taking Klonopin during pregnancy. If you’d like more information on the registry, talk with your doctor. You can also call 888-233-2334 or visit the registry website.

Talking with your doctor

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor before you take Klonopin. They can advise you on the pros and cons of the medication.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Klonopin can cause harmful effects during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re taking Klonopin.

For more information about taking Klonopin during pregnancy, see the “Klonopin and pregnancy” section above.

Klonopin use is not recommended while breastfeeding. The drug is known to pass into breast milk. Klonopin may cause harmful effects in children who are breastfed.

If you’re breastfeeding or thinking about it, talk with your doctor before you take Klonopin. They can advise you on healthy ways to feed your child and possible treatment options.

When you get Klonopin from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store Klonopin tablets at a room temperature of 77°F (25°C) in a tightly sealed container away from light. If needed, you can keep Klonopin at 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) for short periods. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Klonopin and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.