Lyumjev is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to help manage blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Lyumjev is called a mealtime insulin. This means it’s used to help decrease blood sugar spikes that happen after you’ve eaten.

Drug details

Lyumjev contains the active drug insulin lispro-aabc. It’s a rapid-acting analog (human-made version) of the insulin your body makes naturally. For more information about how the drug works, see the “How Lyumjev works” section below.

Lyumjev comes as a liquid solution that’s given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under the skin). The drug can also be given by your doctor as an IV infusion. This is an injection given into a vein over a period of time.

Lyumjev can be injected using:

  • a vial and insulin syringes
  • injection pens that are prefilled or filled using cartridges
  • an insulin pump, only for the U-100 strength of the drug (100 units of insulin per milliliter)

FDA approval

Lyumjev was approved by the FDA in 2020. It’s the first form of a faster-acting insulin lispro (the active drug in Humalog) to be approved by the FDA.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Lyumjev, see the “Lyumjev uses” section below.

Lyumjev is a biologic drug that contains the active drug insulin lispro-aabc. Lyumjev is only currently available as a brand-name drug. It’s not available as a biosimilar. (Biosimilars are like a generic version of a biologic medication.)

Note: The diabetes drug Humalog also contains insulin lispro-aabc, but these drugs aren’t biosimilars. They’re designed to work in slightly different ways in the body, and Lyumjev has additional ingredients that make the body absorb it more quickly than Humalog. Lyumjev is a newer formulation of Humalog. Your doctor or pharmacist can give you more information about how Lyumjev and Humalog compare.

The Lyumjev dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

Typically, your doctor will start you on the recommended dosage for treating your condition. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Lyumjev comes as a liquid solution. Its strengths and forms are described in the following table.

StrengthWays it can be injectedForm and size available
U-100 (100 units of insulin per milliliter [mL])subcutaneously
• through an IV infusion in a hospital
• through an insulin pump
• 10-mL multidose vial for use with insulin syringes or an insulin pump

• 3-mL disposable, prefilled injection pen that may be called a KwikPen (which dispenses whole units of insulin), a Junior KwikPen (which dispenses half and whole units of insulin), or a Tempo Pen (a smart pen that connects to certain devices)

3-mL cartridges for use with certain insulin pens
U-200 (200 units of insulin per mL)• subcutaneously• 3-mL disposable, prefilled injection pen called a KwikPen

Only the Lyumjev U-100 vials can be used with an insulin pump. (Insulin pumps administer insulin into your body continuously.) Ask your doctor or pharmacist or check your insulin pump user manual to find out if you can use Lyumjev with your type of pump.

For more information, see the “How to take Lyumjev” section below.

Dosage for diabetes

The dosage your doctor recommends will depend on whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Your doctor might recommend that you check your blood sugar levels more often than usual during any dosage adjustments. This helps lower your risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar). Do not adjust your dosage without your doctor’s approval.

Type 1 diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, your total daily dose of insulin is based on your body weight. The typical daily insulin dose for this condition is 0.4 units to 1.0 unit of insulin per kilogram (kg) of body weight. One kg is about 2.2 pounds (lb). For example, a doctor prescribes a dosage of 0.5 units/kg/day to a person weighing 150 lb (68 kg). Their total insulin dosage would be 34 units/day. This daily dose will then be divided during the day and at mealtimes.

Most people with type 1 diabetes use an intermediate- or long-acting insulin for half of their daily dose. They take this type of insulin once or twice per day. For the rest of their daily dose, they take a fast-acting insulin, such as Lyumjev, at mealtimes.

You typically take Lyumjev at the start of a meal or within 20 minutes after the start of a meal. The amount of Lyumjev you take with each meal will vary. Your Lyumjev dose is usually based on your blood sugar level before the meal and the amount of carbohydrates you eat.

A healthcare professional will teach you how to calculate and adjust your dose. They can also teach you how to give yourself Lyumjev injections. You’ll inject the drug under the skin of certain parts of your body, such as your abdomen.

If you’re using the U-100 strength (100 units of insulin per milliliter) you may be able to receive Lyumjev through an insulin pump. You should talk with your doctor or pharmacist to see if Lyumjev can be used with your brand and type of insulin pump.

If you need Lyumjev U-100 while in a hospital, you may receive the drug as an IV infusion. Your doctor will determine if you need this type of injection. And they’ll decide the dose that’s right for you if you receive the drug this way. (For more information on Lyumjev injections and infusions, see the “How to take Lyumjev” section below.)

Type 2 diabetes

When you first start treatment for type 2 diabetes, you’ll likely use diabetes medications other than insulin to help manage your blood sugar levels.

In time, you may begin using insulin. You’ll typically start with a long-acting insulin once or twice a day. If your blood sugar isn’t managed well enough with this treatment, then you’ll also use a fast-acting insulin, such as Lyumjev, at mealtimes.

The typical dosage of Lyumjev for type 2 diabetes is 4 units per day. You’ll usually take Lyumjev at the start of your largest meal of the day. You can also take the drug within 20 minutes after the start of this meal. You may eventually take Lyumjev with other meals as well.

A healthcare professional can teach you how to give yourself Lyumjev injections. You’ll inject the drug under the skin of certain parts of your body, such as your abdomen.

If you’re using Lyumjev U-100, you may be able to receive the drug through an insulin pump. You should talk with your doctor or pharmacist to see if Lyumjev can be used with your brand and type of insulin pump.

If you need Lyumjev U-100 while in a hospital, you may receive the drug as an IV infusion. Your doctor will determine if you need this type of injection. And they’ll decide the dose that’s right for you when the drug is given this way. (For more information on Lyumjev injections and infusions, see the “How to take Lyumjev” section below.)

What if I miss a dose?

You’ll typically take Lyumjev at the start of a meal. It’s also possible to take it within 20 minutes after the start of a meal. If you forget, you can check your blood sugar levels to decide if you need an insulin dose. Then you can either take your missed dose or wait until you would normally take the next dose.

If you aren’t sure whether to take a dose of Lyumjev or skip it, talk with your doctor. They can tell you what your blood sugar level should be after eating.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone, or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

It’s possible. Diabetes often requires long-term treatment, and Lyumjev is meant to be used long term. If you and your doctor determine that Lyumjev is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Lyumjev can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Lyumjev. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Lyumjev, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Lyumjev, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Lyumjev can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Lyumjev. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Lyumjev’s prescribing information.
† For more information on these side effects, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Lyumjev aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information on this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Hypoglycemia

The use of Lyumjev may cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). This is the most common side effect for all insulin medications, including Lyumjev. To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

You’re more likely to have hypoglycemia with Lyumjev if you have liver or kidney problems, such as liver and kidney failure. Tell your doctor about any liver or kidney problems you have before taking Lyumjev.

Symptoms of hypoglycemia

Symptoms of hypoglycemia can include:

  • confusion
  • dizziness
  • shaking
  • sweating
  • trouble concentrating

In severe cases, very low blood sugar can lead to seizures and coma.

You should never use Lyumjev while you have hypoglycemia. This could lower your blood sugar even more and make your hypoglycemia symptoms worse.

How to treat hypoglycemia

If you experience symptoms of hypoglycemia while taking Lyumjev, you should eat or drink fast-acting carbohydrates to quickly raise your blood sugar level.

Examples of fast-acting carbohydrates include:

  • juice
  • regular (not diet) soda
  • hard candy
  • glucose tablets or glucose gel

Severe hypoglycemia

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar is so low that you’ll need someone else’s help to treat it. For this reason, your doctor will likely prescribe a drug called glucagon with your insulin. Glucagon can be used to quickly raise your blood sugar if you experience severe hypoglycemia.

Glucagon comes in several different forms, such as a nasal spray (Baqsimi) and an injection (Gvoke). You may need a family member, friend, caregiver, or co-worker to give you glucagon in an emergency. Be sure they know how to use the glucagon product your doctor prescribes.

Taking glucagon isn’t a substitute for emergency treatment. Make sure you or someone else calls 911 or your local emergency number right after you take the glucagon dose.

How to prevent hypoglycemia

Be sure to monitor your blood sugar levels as recommended by your doctor. This is especially important if your insulin treatment plan changes, such as if your doctor adjusts your dosage. Your risk of hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia increases during these times.

To learn more about ways to prevent hypoglycemia, see “How can I help prevent hypoglycemia with Lyumjev?” in the “Common questions about Lyumjev” section below.

Talk with your doctor

For more information about ways to prevent or manage hypoglycemia while taking this drug, talk with your doctor.

Injection site reactions

Using Lyumjev can lead to injection site reactions. These were common side effects in clinical studies of Lyumjev. To find out how often these side effects occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

The following reactions can happen in the area of the skin where Lyumjev is injected:

Be sure not to inject Lyumjev in an area of skin that’s bruised, damaged, hard, scaly, or tender. The drug may not work as well if it’s injected into such areas.

If you’re self-injecting Lyumjev, rotate injection sites each time you use it. This helps to reduce your risk for injection site reactions. You can inject Lyumjev under the skin of your abdomen, buttocks, thigh, or upper arm. (For more information on Lyumjev injections, see the “How to take Lyumjev” section below.)

If you’re concerned about having injection site reactions while taking Lyumjev, talk with your doctor. They can suggest other ways to help relieve this side effect.

Weight gain

Lyumjev may cause weight gain. This is a common side effect of all insulin medications, including Lyumjev. To find out how often this side effect occurred in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Weight gain happens because of the way insulin works in your body. Insulin helps your cells remove sugar from your blood. Some of this sugar is stored as body fat. Over time, this may cause some weight gain.

If you’re concerned about weight gain while using Lyumjev, talk with your doctor. They can suggest tips to help you maintain a healthy weight.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Lyumjev. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, redness, or discoloration in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Lyumjev, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Lyumjev to treat certain conditions. Lyumjev may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Lyumjev for diabetes

Lyumjev is FDA-approved to help manage blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

Type 1 diabetes explained

Type 1 diabetes is a condition that happens when your pancreas doesn’t produce enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body process sugar by moving it from your blood into your body’s cells. Your cells then use the sugar for energy.

Without insulin, your blood sugar levels increase. High blood sugar levels can cause damage to your eyes, heart, kidneys, and nerves.

If you have type 1 diabetes, you need insulin to help manage your blood sugar levels.

Type 2 diabetes explained

Type 2 diabetes is a condition that happens when your body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin. (Insulin resistance means that your body still makes insulin. But the insulin doesn’t process sugar as well as it should.) When this happens, your blood sugar levels increase and cause damage to your eyes, heart, kidneys, and nerves.

If you have type 2 diabetes, you may not need insulin to help manage your blood sugar levels at first. But over time, your pancreas might stop making enough insulin. At that point, you’ll likely need insulin to help manage your blood sugar levels.

Symptoms of diabetes

Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are similar. Possible symptoms of either type of diabetes can include:

Lyumjev explained

Lyumjev contains the active drug insulin lispro-aabc. It’s a rapid-acting analog (human-made version) of the insulin your body makes naturally.

Lyumjev is called a mealtime insulin. This means the drug is used to help decrease blood sugar spikes that happen after you’ve eaten.

For more information about how the drug works, see the “How Lyumjev works” section below.

Effectiveness for diabetes

Lyumjev has been found effective for helping to manage blood sugar levels in type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends rapid-acting insulin products such as Lyumjev for use at mealtimes.

For more information on how the drug performed in clinical studies, see Lyumjev’s prescribing information.

Lyumjev and children

Lyumjev isn’t approved for use in children. It isn’t known if the drug is safe or effective for children.

Lyumjev is typically used in combination with other diabetes medications to help manage your blood sugar levels.

If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you’ll likely use Lyumjev with other types of insulin. This can help to manage your blood sugar levels between meals and at night. Examples of other insulins include:

If you have type 2 diabetes, you’ll probably also use non-insulin treatments with Lyumjev. A few examples of non-insulin drugs that may be used with Lyumjev include:

If you have questions about the drug combination that’s right for treating your diabetes, talk with your doctor.

Lyumjev contains the active drug insulin lispro-aabc. Novolog contains insulin aspart. These forms of insulin have a different chemical makeup, but both are similar to insulin made by the pancreas.

Lyumjev and Novolog are rapid-acting insulins, and both are considered effective for lowering blood sugar levels.

Novolog can be prescribed for adults and children ages 2 years and older, but Lyumjev is used only in adults.

Your doctor or pharmacist can give you more information about how Novolog and Lyumjev compare.

Lyumjev contains insulin lispro-aabc, and Fiasp contains insulin aspart.

The chemical makeup of these forms of insulin are different. But they both resemble insulin made by the pancreas.

Lyumjev and Fiasp are both rapid-acting insulins. Both are considered to be effective for lowering blood sugar levels.

Fiasp can be given to adults or to children. Lyumjev is only used in adults.

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist for more information about how these drugs compare.

Alcohol can affect how well Lyumjev works to manage your blood sugar levels. This is because drinking alcohol can change your blood sugar levels, depending on how much you drink. For this reason, you should avoid drinking alcohol while taking Lyumjev.

Some liquid medications, such as liquid NyQuil, contain small amounts of alcohol as an inactive ingredient. If possible, you should also avoid taking medications that contain alcohol while using Lyumjev.

Before starting Lyumjev, tell your doctor about all medications you’re taking. They can help you determine if those drugs contain alcohol. If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink while taking Lyumjev.

Lyumjev can interact with several other medications.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Lyumjev and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Lyumjev. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Lyumjev.

Before taking Lyumjev, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Types of drugs that can interact with Lyumjev include:

Drugs that can raise your risk for hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) while using Lyumjev. Examples of these drugs include:

Drugs that can make Lyumjev less effective for lowering your blood sugar. Examples of these drugs include:

Drugs that can affect how well Lyumjev works to manage your blood sugar levels. Examples of these drugs include:

Drugs that can mask the symptoms of low blood sugar. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Beta-blockers, such as:
    • metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
    • propranolol (Inderal)
    • bisoprolol
  • clonidine (Kapvay)
  • reserpine

Drugs that can raise your risk for side effects from Lyumjev. Examples of these drugs include:

  • Thiazolidinediones (TZDs), which are used to treat diabetes. Examples include:
  • Potassium-lowering drugs, such as diuretics. Examples include:
    • hydrochlorothiazide
    • indapamide
    • chlorthalidone

Lyumjev and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Lyumjev. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Lyumjev.

Lyumjev and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Lyumjev. However, skipped meals or not eating enough food with Lyumjev could put you at risk for hypoglycemia.

If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Lyumjev, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Lyumjev can vary. To find current prices for Lyumjev vials and injection pens in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, the form of the drug you use, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Lyumjev. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Lyumjev, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Lyumjev, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Lyumjev, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Eli Lilly and Company, the manufacturer of Lyumjev, offers a savings card that may help lower the cost of their drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, visit the drug manufacturer’s website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Lyumjev may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Lyumjev, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic or biosimilar version

Lyumjev is a biologic drug that’s currently available only as a brand-name drug. It’s not available as a biosimilar. Biosimilars are like a generic version of a biologic medication, and they tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

You should take Lyumjev according to your doctor’s or healthcare professional’s instructions.

You can take Lyumjev as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under the skin) in your abdomen (belly), buttocks, thigh, or upper arm. A healthcare professional will show you how to give these injections to yourself.

If you’re receiving the U-100 strength (100 units of insulin per milliliter) of Lyumjev while in a hospital, a healthcare professional will give you the drug as an IV infusion. This is an injection given into a vein over a period of time. Your doctor will determine if you need this type of injection.

If you’re using the U-100 strength of Lyumjev, you might be able to use it with an insulin pump. Insulin pumps administer insulin into your body continuously. Check the user manual for your insulin pump to find out if you can use Lyumjev with your pump. You can also ask your doctor or pharmacist.

If you use an insulin pump, you should have another way to inject insulin, in case the pump fails or doesn’t work correctly. Your doctor can help make sure you have another option.

It’s important that you don’t share your insulin needles with another person. And you shouldn’t share Lyumjev pens with another person, even if you’ve changed the needle. Sharing needles can increase the risk of transmitting or contracting infections.

If you use Lyumjev’s KwikPen, this video shows how to inject the medication. And you can see step-by-step instructions for using Lyumjev pens or vials here.

When to take

You’ll typically take Lyumjev at the start of a meal or within 20 minutes after the start of a meal.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone, or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Lyumjev with food

You should always take Lyumjev with food. The best time to take the drug is at the start of a meal. But you can also use it within 20 minutes after you start the meal.

Lyumjev is used to help manage blood sugar levels in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes.

What happens with diabetes

If you have type 1 diabetes, your pancreas doesn’t produce enough of a hormone called insulin. Insulin helps your body process sugar by moving it from your blood into your body’s cells.

Type 2 diabetes is a condition that happens when your body becomes resistant to the effects of insulin. (Insulin resistance means that your body still makes insulin. But the insulin doesn’t process sugar as well as it should.)

With both types of diabetes, your blood sugar levels increase. And high blood sugar levels can cause damage to your eyes, heart, kidneys, and nerves.

What Lyumjev does

Lyumjev is called a mealtime insulin. This means the drug is used to help decrease blood sugar spikes that happen after you’ve eaten.

Lyumjev contains the active drug insulin lispro-aabc. It’s a rapid-acting analog (human-made version) of the insulin your body makes naturally. It works in your body in the same way as insulin.

How long does it take to work?

Lyumjev starts to manage your blood sugar within 15 minutes of being injected.

Studies haven’t shown harmful effects from using Lyumjev during pregnancy.

The American Diabetes Association recommends that you use insulin medications, such as Lyumjev, to manage blood sugar levels while pregnant. This is because insulin is generally considered safe and effective for use during pregnancy. And diabetes that isn’t well managed during pregnancy can lead to problems during or after pregnancy. These problems can include:

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant while using Lyumjev, talk with your doctor. They can discuss the risks and benefits of Lyumjev treatment during pregnancy.

It’s not known if Lyumjev is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Lyumjev.

For more information about taking Lyumjev during pregnancy, see the “Lyumjev and pregnancy” section above.

Note: Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “female” and “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

For females using Lyumjev. For females taking hormonal birth control (such as the birth control pill), this medication can make Lyumjev less effective for lowering your blood sugar levels.

If you start or stop hormonal birth control while taking Lyumjev, your doctor may need to adjust your Lyumjev dosage. They may also have you check your blood sugar levels more often than usual. This is to make sure Lyumjev is working for you.

Be sure to tell your doctor about any birth control medications you’re taking while using Lyumjev. Also let them know if you start or stop any birth control medications while you’re taking Lyumjev. And if you have questions about using birth control with Lyumjev, talk with your doctor.

For males using Lyumjev. The manufacturer of Lyumjev hasn’t given birth control recommendations for males who use the drug. If you’re a male who’s sexually active with someone who can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while taking Lyumjev.

It isn’t known if Lyumjev is safe to take while breastfeeding or if the drug passes into breast milk. Clinical trials have shown that insulin medications (such as Lyumjev) can pass into breast milk during breastfeeding. But Lyumjev’s use while breastfeeding and its effects on breastfed children, if any, haven’t specifically been studied.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed while using Lyumjev, talk with your doctor. They can discuss the risks and benefits of using the drug.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Lyumjev.

Can Lyumjev be used for diabetic ketoacidosis?

Yes, it’s possible that Lyumjev could be used for the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). DKA is a serious complication of diabetes. It happens when your blood sugar levels are high, but your insulin levels are low. There isn’t enough insulin available to break down sugar for energy. So your body starts breaking down fat for energy instead.

Fat is broken down into ketones (a type of protein). High levels of ketones can make your blood more acidic. This can lead to serious problems, such as kidney failure, and may be fatal.

Symptoms of DKA can include:

  • excessive thirst
  • fruity-smelling breath
  • rapid breathing
  • confusion
  • nausea and vomiting

Because DKA can be life threatening, treatment of DKA typically takes place in a hospital. You’ll receive insulin to help your body break down high levels of sugar. Fast-acting insulins, such as Lyumjev, can be used as part of DKA treatment. However, Lyumjev hasn’t specifically been studied for this purpose. Whether Lyumjev is used for DKA will be up to the doctor who’s treating your condition.

If you use Lyumjev with an insulin pump, a malfunction (when the pump fails to work correctly) could lead to DKA, or to severe hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels). You should have another way to inject insulin, in case your pump fails. Your doctor can help make sure you have another option.

You shouldn’t try to treat DKA on your own. If you experience any symptoms of DKA, call 911 or your local emergency number right away.

How can I help prevent hypoglycemia with Lyumjev?

Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is the most common side effect for all insulin medications, including Lyumjev. Below are a few ways you can help prevent hypoglycemia while taking this drug.

Check your blood sugar levels, especially when your insulin treatment changes. Checking your blood sugar levels often using a home glucose monitor can be helpful for preventing hypoglycemia. Knowing your blood sugar levels can help you decide how much insulin to take and which foods to eat. And this can keep you from using too much insulin, which can cause hypoglycemia.

Some people with diabetes may not recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia. Keeping track of your blood sugar levels consistently can help you know when to take steps to prevent hypoglycemia or when to treat it.

It’s especially important to monitor your blood sugar levels any time your insulin treatment changes. This includes after a dosage adjustment, or if you change the brand or strength of insulin you use. Your doctor might recommend monitoring your blood sugar levels more often during these times. Changes to your insulin treatment can cause hyperglycemia or hypoglycemia.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about how often you should be checking your blood glucose levels.

Be regular about meals and snacks. The timing of when you eat and the amount of food you consume are important for maintaining consistent blood sugar levels.

Take your medication. It’s important to keep taking your diabetes medications exactly as your doctor recommends. You want to do so even if you don’t “feel” that your blood sugar levels are too high.

If you have questions about other ways to help prevent hypoglycemia when taking Lyumjev, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

What can I do to avoid injection site side effects with Lyumjev?

Injection site reactions are a common side effect of Lyumjev.

In the area where Lyumjev is injected, the following skin changes can appear:

If you’re self-injecting Lyumjev, rotate injection sites each time you use it. This helps to reduce your risk for injection site reactions. You can inject Lyumjev under the skin of your abdomen (belly), buttocks, thigh, or upper arm. (For more information on Lyumjev injections, see the “How to take Lyumjev” section above.)

If you’re concerned about having injection site reactions while taking Lyumjev, talk with your doctor. They can suggest other ways to help relieve this side effect.

Before taking Lyumjev, talk with your doctor about your health history. Lyumjev may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

Hypoglycemia. You should not use Lyumjev if you have hypoglycemia. If you’re having an episode of low blood sugar and you use Lyumjev, your blood sugar will decrease even more. This can cause severe hypoglycemia, which can lead to loss of consciousness or a seizure. This can be life threatening. See the “Lyumjev side effects” section above for examples of symptoms and how to treat hypoglycemia.

Heart failure. Taking Lyumjev with diabetes medications called thiazolidinediones (TZDs) can worsen heart failure. Examples of these drugs include pioglitazone (Actos) and rosiglitazone (Avandia). Before starting Lyumjev, tell your doctor if you have heart failure and about any other diabetes medications that you take.

While taking Lyumjev, be sure to tell your doctor if you have any symptoms of worsening heart failure, such as shortness of breath or swelling of your ankles or feet. Your doctor may have you stop using your TZD while you’re taking Lyumjev.

Hypokalemia. Lyumjev can cause new or worsening hypokalemia (a low level of potassium in your blood). This can lead to heart problems such as irregular heartbeat, which can be serious.

Before taking Lyumjev, tell your doctor if you use medications that lower your potassium level. Also tell them if you have health conditions that cause low potassium. They’ll likely monitor your potassium levels closely while you’re taking Lyumjev.

Liver or kidney problems. If you have liver or kidney problems, you’re more likely to have low blood sugar with Lyumjev. These problems include liver and kidney failure. Tell your doctor about any liver or kidney problems you have before taking Lyumjev. They can discuss ways to help prevent low blood sugar while you’re taking this drug.

Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) and hyperglycemia (high blood sugar level). If you’re using Lyumjev with an insulin pump and the pump fails to work correctly, your risk of severe hyperglycemia increases. This can lead to DKA, which is a serious condition that can be life threatening. You should have another option for injecting insulin in case your pump fails. Your doctor can help with this.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Lyumjev or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Lyumjev. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.

Pregnancy. It’s not known for sure if Lyumjev is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Lyumjev and pregnancy” section above.

Breastfeeding. It isn’t known if Lyumjev passes into the breast milk during breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Lyumjev and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Lyumjev, see the “Lyumjev side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Lyumjev can lead to serious side effects. Do not use more Lyumjev than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

* For specific symptoms this condition may cause, see the “Lyumjev side effects” section above.

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Lyumjev from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the medication. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the drug.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Unopened Lyumjev vials, cartridges, and injection pens can be stored at a temperature below 86°F (30°C) for up to 28 days. However, they can be stored until their expiration date if they’re kept in a refrigerator at a temperature between 36°F and 46°F (2°C to 8°C).

Once opened, you can store Lyumjev vials for up to 28 days at room temperature or in a refrigerator. But you should store opened Lyumjev injection pens and cartridges at room temperature. They can be kept for up to 28 days.

Be sure to store Lyumjev vials, cartridges, and injection pens away from light. Discard any of these items that have been open for more than 28 days.

Disposal

Right after you’ve used a syringe, needle, or autoinjector, dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needle. You can buy a sharps container online, or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.