Neupro (rotigotine) is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat Parkinson’s disease in adults. Parkinson’s disease is a movement disorder that becomes worse over time.

Neupro is also approved to treat moderate or severe restless legs syndrome (RLS) in adults. RLS causes twitchiness and discomfort in your legs, usually after going to bed.

Drug details

Neupro contains the active drug rotigotine. Rotigotine belongs to a class of medications called dopamine agonists. (A medication class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.)

Neupro comes as patches that you apply to your skin every day. Neupro patches are available in the following strengths, which are given as milligrams (mg) per 24 hours:

  • 1 mg/24 hours
  • 2 mg/24 hours
  • 3 mg/24 hours
  • 4 mg/24 hours
  • 6 mg/24 hours
  • 8 mg/24 hours

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Neupro, see “Neupro for restless legs syndrome” and “Neupro for Parkinson’s disease” below.

Neupro is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Neupro can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Neupro. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Neupro, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Neupro, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Neupro when used to treat restless legs syndrome (RLS) can include:

  • nausea
  • trouble falling or staying asleep
  • sleepiness
  • headache

Mild side effects of Neupro when prescribed for Parkinson’s disease can include:

  • nausea
  • trouble falling or staying asleep
  • sleepiness
  • dizziness
  • excessive sweating
  • loss of appetite
  • swelling in your hands, ankles, or feet
  • vision problems
  • vomiting

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Neupro. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or see Neupro’s patient information.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Neupro aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Changes in blood pressure. Symptoms can include:
    • feeling dizzy, sweaty, or nauseous when standing up
    • fainting when standing up
  • Elevated heart rate. Symptoms can include:
    • fast pulse
    • lightheadedness
    • shortness of breath
  • Severe weight gain or fluid retention. Symptoms can include:
    • swelling, especially in your ankles or legs
    • sudden increases in weight
  • Augmentation (worsening of symptoms during treatment), or rebound (worsening of symptoms when stopping treatment), in people with RLS. Symptoms can include:
    • worsening severity of RLS symptoms
    • RLS symptoms occurring earlier in the day than before you started taking Neupro
  • Worsening dyskinesia (involuntary movements) in people with Parkinson’s disease. Symptoms can include:
    • uncontrolled or sudden movements, which may be new movements
    • worsening of existing abnormal movements
  • High fever and confusion in people with Parkinson’s disease who suddenly stop taking Neupro. Symptoms can include:
    • elevated body temperature
    • changes in consciousness
  • Allergic reaction, especially if you have a sulfite sensitivity or allergy.*
  • Changes in mental health or behaviors.*
  • Application site reactions.*
  • Sleep problems.*

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here are some details on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Skin irritation and reactions at the application site

It’s possible for Neupro patches to cause skin irritation and reactions at the site where the patch is applied. This may cause symptoms such as:

  • redness
  • swelling
  • itchiness

These symptoms are usually mild and go away after a few days. Applying Neupro patches to a different site each day can reduce your risk for skin irritation and reactions at the application site.

Although rare, application site reactions can be more severe. This may cause symptoms that get worse over time, spread beyond the application site, or don’t go away after a few days. If you experience severe symptoms, talk with your doctor right away. They may suggest stopping Neupro and trying a different medication.

Exposure to MRI or conversion procedures

It’s important to note that the back layer of Neupro patches contains aluminum. This may burn your skin if left on during a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) procedure, or a cardioversion procedure for heart rhythm problems. (Cardioversion refers to having electrical shocks applied to the chest to reset your heart rhythm.)

If you’re scheduled to have an MRI or cardioversion procedure, remove your patch before your procedure. And make sure your doctor is aware that you use Neupro patches.

Exposure to heat sources

You should avoid exposing your Neupro patch to direct heat sources, including:

  • prolonged direct sun exposure
  • heating pads or heat lamps
  • hot tubs or saunas
  • electric blankets
  • heated water beds

The effect of heat on Neupro patches specifically hasn’t been studied. However, clinical studies have shown that heat causes the drugs in similar medicated patches to be absorbed into your body more quickly than usual. This can increase the risk of side effects from the drug.

Sleep problems

Using Neupro may cause sleep problems. These may include somnolence (excessive sleepiness), or problems falling or staying asleep.

Sleep problems caused by Neupro can lead to suddenly falling asleep during a daily activity. This may be referred to as a “sleep attack.” A sleep attack can occur without any warning symptoms, or you may feel drowsy before it happens.

Somnolence was a common side effect in people using Neupro patches in clinical studies. Although not as common, some people reported falling asleep during daily activities (including driving) up to 1 year after starting treatment. This sometimes resulted in accidents.

Before you start taking Neupro, be sure to tell your doctor about all the medications you take. Taking other drugs that cause sleepiness or drowsiness may increase your risk for sleep problems while using Neupro.

If you experience sleep problems while taking Neupro, especially if you fall asleep while you’re doing something, talk with your doctor right away. They’ll re-evaluate the risks and benefits of using Neupro for your condition.

Changes in mental health or behaviors

Neupro may cause changes in mental health or behaviors, although this is uncommon. These changes can include:

  • hallucinations (seeing or hearing things that aren’t actually there)
  • feeling excessively suspicious
  • acting unusually aggressive or agitated
  • delusions (believing things that aren’t true)
  • problems with impulse control or compulsive behaviors, specifically new or increased urges such as to gamble, have sex, or spend money
  • disorganized thinking

You may be at higher risk for changes in mental health or behaviors while using Neupro if you:

While taking Neupro, your doctor will ask about whether you’re experiencing symptoms such as new urges or problems with impulse control. If you have changes in your mental health or behaviors while taking Neupro, talk with your doctor right away. They may lower your Neupro dosage. Or, they may have you stop taking Neupro and try a different treatment.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Neupro. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

It’s important to note that Neupro patches contain sulfite. If you have a sulfite sensitivity or allergy, Neupro may cause a severe, life-threatening allergic reaction. (A sulfite allergy is different from a sulfa allergy.) People with asthma are more likely to have a sulfite allergy.

Remove your patch right away and call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Neupro, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Neupro to treat certain conditions. Neupro may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Neupro is approved to treat moderate to severe restless legs syndrome (RLS) and Parkinson’s disease. For more information about how it’s used for Parkinson’s disease, see the “Neupro for Parkinson’s disease” section below.

People with RLS have discomfort and twitchiness in their legs. Sometimes, these symptoms can occur in other parts of the body, including the arms. This usually happens after going to bed, which may lead to sleep problems, including insomnia. For this reason, RLS is considered a sleep disorder.

RLS may be classified as mild, moderate, or severe, depending on:

  • how severe your symptoms are
  • how often your symptoms occur
  • how much your symptoms affect your life
  • whether movement relieves your symptoms

Effectiveness for restless legs syndrome

In clinical trials, Neupro improved RLS symptoms according to two different rating scales. These included:

  • The International Restless Legs Syndrome (IRLS) rating scale, which rates the following factors:
    • impact of symptoms on mood and daily living
  • The Clinical Global Impression – Improvement (CGI-I) assessment, which scores how RLS progresses during treatment on a seven-point scale

Neupro belongs to a class of medications called dopamine agonists. (A medication class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.) Treatment guidelines endorsed by the American Academy of Neurology recommend dopamine agonists, including Neupro, as a treatment option for RLS.

Neupro and children

Neupro is not approved to treat RLS in children. This is because the drug hasn’t been studied in people younger than 18 years.

If you have questions about treatment options for your child’s RLS, talk with your child’s doctor.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Neupro to treat certain conditions. Neupro may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Neupro is approved to treat Parkinson’s disease and restless legs syndrome (RLS). For more information about how it’s used for RLS, see the “Neupro for restless legs syndrome” section above.

Parkinson’s disease is a movement disorder that affects your nervous system. Most symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are caused by decreasing levels of a chemical called dopamine in your brain.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease get worse over time, and can include:

  • tremors (uncontrolled shaking) while at rest, particularly in your finger, hand, thumb, or chin
  • loss of smell
  • trouble sleeping
  • trouble with walking or moving
  • constipation
  • a voice that’s soft or low
  • dizziness or fainting

Effectiveness for Parkinson’s disease

In clinical trials, people with Parkinson’s disease who used Neupro experienced improvements in their symptoms, according to the Unified Parkinson’s Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS). The UPDRS rates factors such as:

  • severity of motor (movement) symptoms
  • quality of thinking and cognition
  • side effects from treatment
  • impact of symptoms on mood and daily living

Neupro belongs to a class of medications called dopamine agonists. (A medication class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.) Treatment guidelines by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) recommend dopamine agonists, including Neupro, as a treatment option for reducing motor symptoms in adults with Parkinson’s disease.

Neupro and children

Neupro is not approved to treat Parkinson’s disease in children. This is because the drug hasn’t been studied in people younger than 18 years.

Parkinson’s disease symptoms usually don’t affect people ages 50 years and younger. Although rare, Parkinson’s-like symptoms can occur in children and teenagers. This is known as juvenile Parkinsonism, which your child’s doctor can tell you more about.

As with all medications, the cost of Neupro can vary. To find current prices for Neupro in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Neupro. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Neupro, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Neupro, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Neupro, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

UCB, the manufacturer of Neupro, offers a savings card that may help lower the cost of their drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 855-841-0263. Or, you can visit the program website for people with restless legs syndrome or people with Parkinson’s disease.

Additionally, you can find financial assistance options through UCB Patient Support Services.

Mail-order pharmacies

Neupro may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Neupro, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Neupro is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

The Neupro dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on the type and severity of the condition you’re using Neupro to treat.

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Neupro comes as patches that you apply to your skin every 24 hours. The patch may be put on your:

  • belly
  • flank (the side of your body, between your ribs and pelvis)
  • hip
  • shoulder
  • thigh
  • upper arm

Neupro patches are available in the following strengths, which are given as milligrams (mg) per 24 hours:

  • 1 mg/24 hours
  • 2 mg/24 hours
  • 3 mg/24 hours
  • 4 mg/24 hours
  • 6 mg/24 hours
  • 8 mg/24 hours

Dosage for restless legs syndrome

For treating moderate to severe restless legs syndrome, the recommended starting dosage of Neupro is a 1-mg/24-hour patch, once per day. Your doctor may increase your dosage by 1 mg/24 hours each week, up to a maximum recommended dosage of a 3-mg/24-hour patch, once per day.

The patch should be applied at about the same time each day.

Dosage for Parkinson’s disease

For treating Parkinson’s disease, the recommended starting dosage of Neupro is a 2-mg/24-hour patch, once per day. Your doctor may increase your dosage by 2 mg/24 hours each week, up to a maximum recommended dosage of an 8-mg/24-hour patch, once per day.

The patch should be applied at about the same time each day.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Neupro, apply your patch as soon as you remember. Replace the patch at your normal time the next day, even if it hasn’t been a full 24 hours.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Neupro is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Neupro is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Other drugs are available that can treat restless legs syndrome (RLS) or Parkinson’s disease. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Neupro, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Alternatives for restless legs syndrome

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat RLS include:

Alternatives for Parkinson’s disease

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat Parkinson’s disease include:

  • levodopa/carbidopa (Sinemet)
  • levodopa inhalation powder (Inbrija)
  • other dopamine agonists,* such as:
    • pramipexole (Mirapex)
    • ropinirole (Requip)
  • apomorphine (Apokyn, Kynmobi)
  • MAO-B inhibitors, such as:
    • selegiline (Zelapar, Emsam)
    • safinamide (Xadago)
  • COMT-inhibitors, including:
    • entacapone (Comtan)
  • amantadine (Gocovri)
  • istradefylline (Nourianz)
  • levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone (Stalevo)

* Neupro belongs to a class of medications called dopamine agonists. A medication class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.

Neupro (rotigotine) is approved to treat adults with Parkinson’s disease, and adults with moderate or severe restless legs syndrome (RLS). Below are details about how the drug works to treat these conditions.

Neupro for Parkinson’s disease

Parkinson’s disease is a movement disorder that affects your nervous system. Most symptoms of Parkinson’s disease are caused by decreasing levels of a chemical called dopamine in your brain. This condition is progressive, which means it gets worse over time.

The active drug in Neupro, rotigotine, is a type of drug called a dopamine agonist. It’s thought that rotigotine works to treat Parkinson’s disease by increasing amounts of dopamine in certain areas of your brain. This may reduce symptoms of Parkinson’s disease. However, the exact way the drug works for this condition isn’t fully understood.

Neupro for restless legs syndrome

RLS is a condition that causes twitchiness and discomfort in the legs, usually after going to bed. Symptoms may come and go, but tend to get worse over time. Although some people experience RLS as a side effect of a drug or due to another medical condition, it isn’t known what causes RLS in most people.

It isn’t known exactly how Neupro works to treat RLS. It’s thought that the drug works to stimulate (attach to) dopamine receptors (a type of protein) in the brain. This increases dopamine levels in your body, which may help reduce RLS symptoms.

How long does it take to work?

Neupro may take some time to work, since the drug isn’t immediately absorbed by your skin. The drug usually won’t show up on blood tests until at least 3 hours after applying a patch. It can take up to just over 24 hours for your body to fully absorb the drug, especially after your first dose.

It’s possible to have withdrawal symptoms if you stop using Neupro patches to treat either Parkinson’s disease or restless legs syndrome (RLS).

With withdrawal, you have unpleasant symptoms when you stop taking a drug that your body has become dependent on. Symptoms of Neupro withdrawal can include:

If you have additional questions about tapering off or stopping Neupro, talk with your doctor. And if you have thoughts about harming yourself, call 911 or your local emergency number right away.

Tapering off Neupro for Parkinson’s disease

If you’re going to stop Neupro treatment for Parkinson’s disease, your doctor will have you taper (gradually decrease) your dosage. Neupro’s manufacturer recommends lowering your dosage by 2 milligrams (mg) per 24 hours, preferably every other day. This should be repeated until your doctor says it’s safe for you to stop taking Neupro.

It’s important to follow your doctor’s instructions for tapering off Neupro for Parkinson’s disease. Suddenly stopping Neupro when used for Parkinson’s disease can cause additional withdrawal symptoms, including:

  • high fever
  • rigid muscles
  • altered consciousness (changes in thinking)
  • rhabdomyolysis (a condition in which muscle tissue breaks down, which can lead to kidney failure)

Tapering off Neupro for restless legs syndrome

If you’re going to stop Neupro treatment for RLS, your doctor will have you taper (gradually decrease) your dosage. Neupro’s manufacturer recommends lowering your dosage by 1 mg/24 hours, preferably every other day. This should be repeated until your doctor says it’s safe for you to stop taking Neupro.

It’s important to follow your doctor’s instructions for tapering off Neupro for RLS. Doing this can help you avoid withdrawal symptoms.

You should take Neupro according to your doctor’s or healthcare professional’s instructions.

Neupro comes as patches that you apply to the skin of your:

  • belly
  • flank (the side of your body, between your ribs and pelvis)
  • hip
  • shoulder
  • thigh
  • upper arm

You should wear your Neupro patch for 24 hours, and then remove it and apply a new patch. Neupro patches should be applied to a different area of skin each day. And you shouldn’t use the same application site more than once every 14 days. This can help prevent application site reactions. For example, if you apply a patch to your belly, use a different area of the body or a different place on your belly when you apply your next patch.

If you need to apply Neupro to an area that has body hair, you should shave the area at least 3 days before applying a Neupro patch.

Avoid placing Neupro patches on skin that’s damaged, irritated, or oily. You should also avoid wearing tight clothing over your patch. Doing this could cause the patch to come off or tear.

When to take

You should apply Neupro patches once a day, at about the same time each day. There’s no best time to apply the patches, but make sure to apply them at the same time each day.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Neupro with food

You can use Neupro patches regardless of whether or not you’ve eaten. Unlike some other routes of administration, medicated patches usually aren’t affected by food.

Can Neupro patches be cut?

You shouldn’t cut or tear Neupro patches. Doing so may affect how the drug is released and how well it works. It may also increase your risk for side effects.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Neupro.

Is there anything to know about stopping Neupro treatment?

You should not stop using Neupro unless your doctor tells you it’s safe to do so. They’ll likely have you taper (gradually decrease) your Neupro dosage. This can help prevent withdrawal symptoms after stopping the drug. Withdrawal refers to unpleasant symptoms that can occur when you stop taking a drug that your body is dependent on.

For more information, see the “Neupro withdrawal and dependence” section above.

Is Neupro a controlled substance?

No, Neupro isn’t a controlled substance. Controlled substances have the potential to be misused (used in a way other than they’re prescribed), so their use is controlled by the federal government.

Even though it isn’t a controlled substance, Neupro can cause unpleasant symptoms if you suddenly stop using it. For more information, see the “Neupro withdrawal and dependence” section above.

Can I wear Neupro patches in a pool or hot tub?

You can wear Neupro patches in a pool, but not in a hot tub.

You may bathe, shower, or swim in a pool while wearing your Neupro patch. However, avoid exposing your Neupro patch to heat sources, including hot tubs, saunas, and direct sunlight. Heat can increase the amount of Neupro your body absorbs, which can increase your risk for side effects.

It’s important to be aware that water may cause your Neupro patch to loosen and become unattached. If this happens, apply a new patch for the rest of the day. The next day, replace the patch at your usual time.

If you have more questions about what to do and avoid while using Neupro patches, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about alcohol use before you start using Neupro patches.

Drinking alcohol could increase your risk for certain side effects from Neupro patches. These may include drowsiness or excessive sleepiness. Your doctor can recommend whether it’s safe for you to drink alcohol while using Neupro.

Neupro can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Neupro and other medications

Neupro belongs to a class of medications called dopamine agonists. (A medication class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.) Drugs called dopamine antagonists work in the opposite way to dopamine agonists. Taking these types of drugs while you’re using Neupro patches may cause Neupro to be less effective.

Examples of dopamine antagonists to avoid while using Neupro include:

Before taking Neupro, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

This article does not contain all drugs that may interact with Neupro. If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Neupro and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Neupro. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Neupro.

Neupro and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Neupro. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Neupro, talk with your doctor.

It’s not known if it’s safe to use Neupro during pregnancy. This is because the drug’s use during pregnancy hasn’t been studied.

In animal studies, the drug led to birth defects and loss of pregnancy when given to pregnant females. But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in people.

If you have more questions about treating your condition while pregnant, talk with your doctor.

It’s not known if Neupro is safe to use during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Neupro.

For more information about taking Neupro during pregnancy, see the “Neupro and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if it’s safe to use Neupro while breastfeeding. Specifically, it isn’t known whether the drug passes into human breast milk or how it could affect a breastfed child.

The active drug in Neupro, rotigotine, may decrease levels of a hormone called prolactin in the body, which may decrease milk production. But there isn’t enough data to determine for certain whether this is the case.

In animal studies, the drug passed into the milk of lactating females. But animal studies don’t always predict how the drug will work in people.

If you have questions about treatments for your condition and breastfeeding, talk with your doctor.

Before taking Neupro, talk with your doctor about your health history. Neupro may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Daytime sleepiness due to a sleep disorder or unpredictable periods of sleep. Neupro can cause sleep problems, including daytime sleepiness and unpredictable “sleep attacks.” (A sleep attack refers to falling asleep suddenly during a daily activity.) Before you start treatment with Neupro, your doctor will review your risk factors for sleep problems. If you already have sleep problems, they may have you try a different medication for your condition.
  • Mental health conditions, including bipolar disorder or schizophrenia. Neupro can cause mental health conditions, including schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. If you already have a mental health condition, Neupro may make it worse. Be sure to tell your doctor about any problems with mental health that you have before you start taking Neupro.
  • High or low blood pressure. Neupro can cause high or low blood pressure. Although rare, these changes can be serious. If you already have high or low blood pressure, be sure to tell your doctor before you take Neupro.
  • Heart problems. Although rare, Neupro can cause an elevated heart rate and changes in blood pressure. If you have heart problems, you may be at higher risk for these side effects. Be sure your doctor is aware of any heart problems you may have before you use Neupro patches.
  • Orthostatic hypotension. Neupro may cause orthostatic hypotension. If you already have this condition, Neupro might make it worse. Talk with your doctor if you have orthostatic hypotension before taking Neupro.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Neupro or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Neupro. Ask your doctor about other medications that might be better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It is not known if it’s safe to use Neupro while pregnant. For more information, see the “Neupro and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It is not known if it’s safe to use Neupro while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Neupro and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Neupro, see the “Neupro side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Neupro can lead to serious side effects. Do not use more Neupro than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Neupro from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the box. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Neupro patches should be stored at room temperature (68°F to 77°F or 20°C to 25°C) in its original carton. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

After you remove a Neupro patch, immediately dispose of it in the trash. Keep used patches away from children, animals, and other people.

If you no longer need to take Neupro and have leftover patches, it’s important to dispose of the drug safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking it by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

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