Nexplanon is a brand-name prescription birth control device. It’s FDA-approved to help prevent pregnancy in females who can become pregnant. (Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.)

Drug details

Nexplanon is a type of hormonal birth control. It contains the active drug etonogestrel, which belongs to a drug class called progestins. Progestins are synthetic hormones that act as progesterone (a type of hormone found in your body).

You may hear Nexplanon referred to as a “birth control implant.” This is because Nexplanon comes as a thin plastic device that your doctor will implant (insert) into your arm. The implant releases etonogestrel to help prevent pregnancy. The Nexplanon implant is typically effective for up to 3 years after insertion.

Nexplanon comes in one strength: 68 milligrams (mg).

Note: Another birth control implant called Implanon used to be available but has been discontinued. Implanon had the same active drug as Nexplanon: etonogestrel.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Nexplanon, see the “Nexplanon for preventing pregnancy” section below.

The active drug of Nexplanon is etonogestrel. Nexplanon is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Nexplanon can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Nexplanon. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Nexplanon, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Nexplanon, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Nexplanon can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Nexplanon. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Nexplanon’s prescribing information.
† For more information about this side effect, see the “Nexplanon insertion and removal” section below.
‡ To learn more about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Nexplanon are not common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* To learn more about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause. To find out how often side effects occurred in clinical trials, see the prescribing information for Nexplanon.

Weight gain

Some people may experience an increase in their body weight while they are using Nexplanon. Weight gain was one of the most common side effects in clinical trials of Nexplanon.

In trials, people using Nexplanon gained about 2.8 pounds (lb) after 1 year of use. After 2 years, they gained about 3.7 lb. However, it’s not known how much of this weight gain was specifically due to Nexplanon implants.

What you can do

If you notice unexpected weight gain while using Nexplanon, talk with your doctor. They may recommend changes in exercise or diet to help manage your body weight.

Spotting and changes in period bleeding

Nexplanon use can cause changes in period bleeding, including spotting. This was a common side effect that was reported in clinical trials of Nexplanon.

In fact, soon after your doctor implants Nexplanon, you may experience changes in period bleeding, such as:

  • spotting
  • bleeding more than usual
  • bleeding less often than usual or not at all
  • having a more intense or less intense period
  • having longer or shorter periods

In clinical trials, the most common reason people stopped using Nexplanon was irregular bleeding.

What you can do

The pattern of your period in the first 3 months after you receive Nexplanon usually indicates the pattern of future periods. However, be sure to talk with your doctor if you experience unusual spotting or changes in bleeding with Nexplanon use. In rare cases, unusual bleeding can be a sign of cancer.

Your doctor can help determine if the bleeding is due to your period or another condition. If you have unusual bleeding that does not go away, they may recommend removing your Nexplanon implant.

Acne

Acne was a common side effect of Nexplanon in clinical trials. The drug affects hormone levels, which can cause acne. Because of this, Nexplanon may increase your risk of developing acne.

What you can do

If you experience severe or bothersome acne while using Nexplanon, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend acne treatments or face washes. These may help prevent acne from occurring.

Depression and other changes in mood

It’s possible to experience depression or other changes in mood (also known as “mood swings”) from Nexplanon use. Depression and mood changes were not commonly reported side effects in clinical trials. However, it’s still important that you’re aware of the risks of these side effects before you start using Nexplanon.

Symptoms of depression or other mood changes to watch out for may include:

  • feeling sad or hopeless
  • anxiety
  • restlessness
  • sleeping more or less often than usual
  • lack of interest in activities that you used to enjoy

What you can do

Tell your doctor right away if you develop any symptoms of depression or other mood changes. If you develop symptoms of depression, your doctor may recommend treating your depression right away. In some cases, they may recommend removing your Nexplanon implant.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after getting a Nexplanon implant.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your mouth, tongue, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Nexplanon, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

A doctor or another healthcare professional will implant (insert) Nexplanon into your arm. They will do this at an office visit.

How Nexplanon is inserted

Before giving you Nexplanon, your doctor will likely recommend you take a pregnancy test. This is to confirm that you are not pregnant before they insert your Nexplanon implant.

When it’s time to insert your Nexplanon device, your doctor will numb your skin. Then, they’ll use the applicator that Nexplanon comes in to insert the implant. They’ll place the Nexplanon implant into your non-dominant arm under your skin. For example, if you’re right-handed, your doctor will insert Nexplanon in your left arm. Then, they’ll check that they have implanted it correctly in your arm.

After inserting Nexplanon, your doctor will have you wear a pressure bandage for 24 hours. You’ll then wear a small bandage for 3 to 5 days.

If you cannot feel your Nexplanon implant after it’s been inserted, talk withyour doctor. They’ll want to make sure the implant is in the proper place and working correctly. You should use another form of nonhormonal birth control, such as a condom, until you can see your doctor.

How Nexplanon is removed

When you are ready to have your Nexplanon implant removed, make an appointment with your doctor. They will feel for the implant in your arm to see exactly where it is. Then, they will mark the ends of the implant on your arm with a marker. After, they will numb your arm and then make a small cut near the implant. They will remove the implant with forceps (tweezers).

The doctor will then apply a bandage or wound dressing to the site where they removed the implant. They will have you wear a pressure bandage for 24 hours. You will then wear a small bandage for 3 to 5 days.

If you’re having another Nexplanon implant inserted, your doctor can remove the old implant and put a new one in at the same time.

Side effects of Nexplanon insertion and removal

Since Nexplanon is an implant that’s placed under your skin, you may experience some side effects after the implant is inserted or removed. These side effects weren’t common in clinical trials, but they may still occur.

Some side effects from Nexplanon insertion and removal may include:

  • bruising
  • pain
  • itchiness
  • irritation
  • scarring
  • thickening of the skin at the insertion site
  • numbness near the insertion site
  • abscess (swelling and pus buildup) or infection in the insertion site

Rarely, it’s possible for your Nexplanon implant to move from your arm into other areas of your body. These may include your arteries (blood vessels) or your chest. Symptoms of your Nexplanon implant moving may include:

If you have side effects after Nexplanon insertion or removal that are severe or bothersome, tell a doctor. They can suggest ways to decrease these side effects. If you experience any symptoms of Nexplanon moving, see a doctor or go to the hospital right away. They will help determine the cause of your symptoms to see if it’s due to Nexplanon.

When to have Nexplanon inserted and removed

Below is information about when Nexplanon is inserted and removed.

When to have Nexplanon inserted

Your doctor can insert Nexplanon once they have determined that you are not pregnant. However, the appropriate time to insert Nexplanon depends on several factors. These include whether you:

Nexplanon is a form of hormonal birth control. So, your doctor will likely insert your implant at a certain time during your period. This is because the levels of certain hormones in your body change during your period. And it’s important that Nexplanon is inserted at a certain time for it to be effective.

Specifically, your doctor will insert Nexplanon during the first 5 days of your period. If the implant is inserted after the fifth day, your doctor will recommend you use a form of nonhormonal birth control for 7 days. An example of nonhormonal birth control is a condom.

When to have Nexplanon removed

Nexplanon is effective for up to 3 years of use. You should have your Nexplanon implant replaced at least once every 3 years. Your doctor can help you keep track of when your implant needs to be removed.

You’ll also receive a user card after Nexplanon is implanted. The user card will state the date you received your implant and the date it needs to be removed. You can also note these dates on a calendar or use a reminder app.

If you’d like to have your Nexplanon implant removed sooner than 3 years, talk with your doctor. They can safely remove the implant at any time.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs, such as Nexplanon, for certain uses.

Nexplanon is a birth control device. It’s FDA-approved to help prevent pregnancy in females* who can become pregnant.

To learn more about sexual health or other birth control options, see Medical News Today’s sexual health hub.

Effectiveness for preventing pregnancy

Nexplanon implants are effective in preventing pregnancy. The etonogestrel implant is considered a highly effective form of birth control in the Center for Disease Control’s (CDC) recommendations for contraceptive use. (Etonogestrel is the active drug in Nexplanon implant).

Nexplanon pregnancy rate

Nexplanon is an effective form of birth control. In fact, Nexplanon is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. To learn more about Nexplanon’s pregnancy rate, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. For more information on how Nexplanon performed in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Nexplanon and children

Nexplanon can be prescribed to females* under 18 years old who can become pregnant. Nexplanon has not been studied in females younger than 18 years old. However, Nexplanon implants are believed to be just as safe and effective in this group as it is in adults.

If you’re under 18 years old and are interested in using Nexplanon as a form of birth control, talk with your doctor.

Note: Nexplanon is not approved for use in people who have not had their periods or have not gone through puberty.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Other drugs are available that can help prevent pregnancy. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Nexplanon, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Alternatives for preventing pregnancy

Examples of other drugs that may be used to help prevent pregnancy include:

  • the birth control ring ethinyl estradiol/etonogestrel vaginal ring (NuvaRing)
  • the birth control patch ethinyl estradiol/norelgestromin patch (Xulane)
  • the birth control injection medroxyprogesterone (Depo-Provera)
  • the birth control gel citric acid/lactic acid/potassium bitartrate (Phexxi)
  • intrauterine devices (IUDs), such as:
  • birth control pills, such as:
    • combination pills that contain both estrogen and progestin, such as:
      • ethinyl estradiol/norethindrone (Junel, Loestrin Fe)
      • drospirenone/ethinyl estradiol (Yaz)
    • progestin-only pills, such as:
      • norethindrone (Camila, Errin, Nor-QD)

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Nexplanon.

Will I feel itchy and have bruising when Nexplanon is inserted or removed?

Maybe. It’s possible to have itchy skin or bruising at the site where your Nexplanon device is inserted or removed. (Nexplanon is a form of hormonal birth control that’s implanted in your arm, under the skin.)

There are also other side effects that can occur at the insertion or removal site. (For more information, see the “Nexplanon insertion and removal” section above.)

Is Nexplanon a type of hormonal birth control?

Yes, Nexplanon is a type of hormonal birth control. It contains the active drug etonogestrel, which belongs to a drug class called progestins. Progestins are synthetic hormones that act as progesterone (a type of hormone found in your body). This hormone helps prevent pregnancy. (For more information about how Nexplanon works in your body, see the “How Nexplanon works” section below.)

If you are concerned about using hormonal birth control, nonhormonal options are available. These include:

If you have questions about hormonal birth control, talk with your doctor. They’ll recommend the best birth control options for you.

Does Nexplanon cause hair loss?

Possibly. Hair loss was not a side effect reported in clinical trials of Nexplanon. However, there were reports of hair loss after the drug became available for use.

If you are concerned about hair loss occurring during Nexplanon use, talk with your doctor.

Can I take antibiotics with Nexplanon?

Yes, you can take most antibiotics with Nexplanon. Certain antibiotics or antifungal medications may interact with Nexplanon. However, most antibiotics are safe to take with Nexplanon.

If you need to take antibiotics, tell your doctor that you’re using Nexplanon. They’ll usually prescribe you an antibiotic that won’t interact with Nexplanon.

However, it’s possible you’ll need to take an antibiotic that may interact with Nexplanon. In this rare case, your doctor may recommend you use another form of birth control. This is because Nexplanon may become less effective.

For more information on the specific antibiotics and antifungals that may interact with Nexplanon, see the “Nexplanon interactions” section below.

Should I expect breast or vaginal discharge with Nexplanon?

Neither breast nor vaginal discharge were common side effects reported in clinical trials of Nexplanon. However, breast discharge was reported after the drug became available for use.

Keep in mind that breast discharge can be a symptom of breast cancer. In rare cases, hormonal birth control, such as Nexplanon, may increase the risk of breast cancer coming back in people who’ve had it in the past. (For more information, see the “Nexplanon precautions” section below.)

If you have breast discharge while using Nexplanon, talk with your doctor. Especially, tell them if you have this side effect and have had breast cancer in the past. They’ll likely check for other symptoms of breast cancer.

You’ll likely won’t experience vaginal discharge from Nexplanon use. But it’s possible to experience changes in your period. These changes may include bleeding more often or more intensely than usual. (For more information, see the “Nexplanon side effects” section above.)

If you notice any vaginal discharge while using Nexplanon, talk with your doctor. They can help you determine if this is due to using Nexplanon.

As with all medications, the cost of Nexplanon can vary. To find current prices for Nexplanon in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for Nexplanon, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Nexplanon, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Nexplanon, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Organon, the manufacturer of Nexplanon, offers information about the cost of the drug on their website. They also provide tips about insurance coverage.

To learn more about saving money on prescriptions, check out this article.

Generic version

The active drug of Nexplanon is etonogestrel. Nexplanon is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Nexplanon is a brand-name prescription birth control device. It’s approved to help prevent pregnancy in females* who can become pregnant. Nexplanon comes as a thin plastic device that your doctor will implant (insert) into your arm.

For pregnancy to occur, a sperm cell must fertilize an egg that’s been released from the ovary. The conditions in your cervix and uterus need to be ideal for the sperm to properly move through and reach the egg.

To help prevent pregnancy, Nexplanon works by:

  • helping prevent ovulation (when an ovary releases an egg)
  • increasing the thickness of cervical mucus, which makes it hard for sperm to reach the egg
  • causing changes in your uterine lining that will make it harder for pregnancy to occur

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

How long does it take to work?

How long Nexplanon takes to work depends on when it’s implanted (inserted).

If your doctor inserts Nexplanon during the first 5 days of your period, it begins working right away. In this case, you likely won’t need to use another form of birth control to help prevent pregnancy.

If your doctor inserts Nexplanon after the fifth day of your period, it can take a week for Nexplanon to be fully effective. This means that for 1 week after Nexplanon is implanted, your doctor will recommend using another form of birth control to help prevent pregnancy.

How long does it last?

Nexplanon is effective for up to 3 years of use. You should have your Nexplanon implant replaced at least once every 3 years.

When you get your Nexplanon implant, your doctor will give you a user card. This card will have the date you received your implant. It’ll also include the date it should be removed.

If you’d like to have Nexplanon removed sooner than 3 years, talk with your doctor. For more information, see “When to have Nexplanon inserted and removed” in the “Nexplanon insertion and removal” section above.

Below is information on Nexplanon dosage. Nexplanon only comes in one strength. So, everyone who’s prescribed the drug will receive the same dosage.

Drug forms and strengths

Nexplanon comes as a thin plastic implant in an applicator. Your doctor will use the applicator to insert Nexplanon into your arm.

Nexplanon comes in one strength: 68 milligrams (mg) of etonogestrel.

Dosage for preventing pregnancy

Nexplanon is inserted once every 3 years. The device is effective for up to 3 years.

If you’d like to have Nexplanon removed sooner than this, talk with your doctor.

Children’s dosage

Nexplanon can be used to help prevent pregnancy in females* under 18 years old who can become pregnant. For this use, the dosage of Nexplanon is the same for this group as it is for adults.

Nexplanon is inserted once every 3 years. The device is effective for up to 3 years.

If you’d like to have Nexplanon removed sooner than this, talk with your doctor.

Note: Nexplanon is not approved to be used in people who have not gotten their period or have not gone through puberty.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Nexplanon is meant to be used as a long-term treatment to help prevent pregnancy.

Nexplanon can work as a birth control method for up to 3 years before it needs to be replaced. However, if you’d like to remove your implant sooner than 3 years, talk with your doctor. They can remove it at any time.

Nexplanon can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements, foods, and lab blood tests.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Nexplanon and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Nexplanon. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Nexplanon.

Before taking Nexplanon, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all the prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

The types of drugs that may interact with Nexplanon include:

  • Certain HIV medications. If you’re taking certain HIV medications, they may affect how well Nexplanon helps prevent pregnancy. Examples of these drugs include:
    • efavirenz (Sustiva)
    • etravirine (Intelence)
    • nelfinavir (Viracept)
    • ritonavir (Norvir)
    • lopinavir/ritonavir (Kaletra)
    • nevirapine (Viramune)
  • Certain seizure medications. Some seizure medications may decrease the effectiveness of Nexplanon. Examples of these drugs may include:
    • felbamate (Felbatol)
  • Certain antibiotic medications.* These drugs may decrease the effectiveness of Nexplanon. Examples of these drugs may include:
    • rifampin (Rimactane)
    • rifabutin (Mycobutin)
  • Certain antifungal medications. These drugs may increase the risk of side effects from Nexplanon. Examples of these drugs may include:
    • itraconazole (Sporanox)
    • voriconazole (Vfend)
  • The pulmonary hypertension medication bosentan (Tracleer). This medication may make Nexplanon less effective.
  • The nausea and vomiting drug aprepitant (Emend). This medication may decrease how well Nexplanon works.

* For more information about antibiotics and Nexplanon, see “Can I take antibiotics with Nexplanon?” in the “Common questions about Nexplanon” section above.

Nexplanon and herbs and supplements

The herbal supplement St. John’s wort may decrease the effectiveness of Nexplanon. St. John’s wort is sometimes used to treat depression. Be sure to tell your doctor if you are taking St. John’s wort before getting your Nexplanon implant.

Nexplanon and foods

Nexplanon can interact with grapefruit or grapefruit juice. Grapefruit and grapefruit juice can increase your risk for side effects from Nexplanon. Your doctor may recommend you avoid grapefruit or grapefruit juice while you are using Nexplanon. (To learn more about side effects with Nexplanon, see the “Nexplanon side effects” section above.)

Nexplanon and lab tests

Nexplanon can interact with certain lab blood tests. These include:

  • Sex hormone-binding globulin test. This test measures the levels of certain hormones in your body. In some cases, the levels may be lower than usual for the first 6 months after you receive your Nexplanon implant. So, if you need this test, your doctor may wait 6 months after they insert Nexplanon to check the levels.
  • Thyroxine test. This test checks a thyroid hormone called thyroxine (T4). When you first receive Nexplanon, your thyroxine levels may be lower than usual. Eventually, your levels should return to normal. So, if you need a thyroxine test, your doctor may postpone it to allow your levels to return to normal.

If you need any of the above tests while you’re using Nexplanon, tell your doctor that you have the Nexplanon implant.

There are no known interactions between alcohol use and Nexplanon.

Talk with your doctor about how much, if any, alcohol may be safe for you to drink while you’re using Nexplanon.

Nexplanon is a birth control device. It’s approved to help prevent pregnancy, so you should not use it during pregnancy.

However, it’s important to note that no birth control is 100% effective at preventing pregnancy. Nexplanon is over 99% effective at preventing pregnancy. So, if you’re sexually active, there’s a very small chance that you can become pregnant while using Nexplanon.

If you find out that you’re pregnant while you’re using Nexplanon, your doctor will likely remove your implant. However, studies haven’t shown developmental problems in children who were exposed to Nexplanon during pregnancy.

If you have questions about Nexplanon and pregnancy, talk with your doctor.

Nexplanon and fertility

Nexplanon is meant to help prevent pregnancy. After your doctor removes the device, your fertility (ability to become pregnant) should return to normal.

In clinical trials, some people were able to become pregnant as early as 7 days after having their etonogestrel implant removed. (Etonogestrel is the active drug in Nexplanon.)

If you have questions about your fertility after removing Nexplanon, talk with your doctor. To learn about how Nexplanon is inserted and removed, see the “Nexplanon insertion and removal” section above.

Nexplanon is a form of hormonal birth control that’s implanted (inserted) in your arm. It’s approved to help prevent pregnancy.*

You shouldn’t need to use any other forms of birth control when you’re using Nexplanon unless:

  • it’s the first week after your doctor implants Nexplanon†
  • you need to take certain medications‡

In these cases, talk with your doctor about the best form of birth control for you.

* For more information about Nexplanon and pregnancy, see the “Nexplanon and pregnancy” section above.
† To learn more about how Nexplanon is inserted, see the “Nexplanon insertion and removal” section above.
‡ For details about these medications, see the “Nexplanon interactions” section above.

Nexplanon is likely safe to use while breastfeeding.

The active drug in Nexplanon, etonogestrel, is known to pass into breast milk. So, if you breastfeed and use Nexplanon, the child you are breastfeeding will likely have exposure to the drug. However, clinical trials have not shown developmental problems in children who were breastfed and exposed to Nexplanon.

Estonogestrel is also known to decrease breast milk production. If you’re breastfeeding or concerned about how much breast milk you’re producing, talk with your doctor before getting the Nexplanon implant. You and your doctor can decide if Nexplanon is right for you.

This drug comes with several precautions. Before taking Nexplanon, talk with your doctor about your health history. Nexplanon may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Blood clots. Nexplanon may increase the risk of developing blood clots. If you have blood clots or had them in the past, your risk of developing them may increase with Nexplanon use. In this case, your doctor may recommend a different form of birth control for you.
  • Liver problems, including liver tumors. If you have certain liver problems, including liver tumors, doctors typically will not prescribe Nexplanon. Hormonal birth control, such as Nexplanon, may increase the risk of your liver problems getting worse. So, your doctor will recommend a different birth control option for you.
  • Genital bleeding. If you have unusual genital bleeding, your doctor will not recommend Nexplanon. In rare cases, genital bleeding can be due to other conditions, such as cancer. If you have genital bleeding, your doctor will likely determine its cause before prescribing you Nexplanon. Tell your doctor about any unusual bleeding you have before you use Nexplanon.
  • Breast cancer or other types of hormone-sensitive cancer. Tell your doctor if you have or had breast cancer or other types of hormone-sensitive cancers. Nexplanon may increase the risk of hormone-sensitive cancers coming back. This includes certain types of breast cancer. In this case, your doctor will likely recommend a different birth control option for you.
  • Diabetes or prediabetes. Nexplanon may increase your blood sugar levels. If you have prediabetes or diabetes, Nexplanon use may worsen these conditions. If you use Nexplanon, your doctor may recommend monitoring your blood sugar more often. This is to be sure that your blood sugar isn’t worsening. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a different form of birth control for you.
  • High cholesterol or triglycerides. Nexplanon can increase your cholesterol or triglyceride levels. If you already have high cholesterol or high triglyceride levels, Nexplanon use can increase your levels further. In this case, your doctor may recommend monitoring your cholesterol and triglyceride levels more often. In some cases, they may recommend a different birth control option for you.
  • Gallbladder problems. You may have an increased risk of gallbladder disease if you’re using Nexplanon. If you already have gallbladder problems, Nexplanon use may worsen your condition. Your doctor can help determine if Nexplanon is a safe birth control option for you.
  • Kidney problems. Tell your doctor about any kidney problems you have before starting Nexplanon. If you have these problems, your doctor may recommend a form of nonhormonal birth control.
  • Depression. Nexplanon can increase your risk of developing depression or changes in mood. If you currently have depression or had it in the past, Nexplanon may worsen it. Your doctor may monitor you more often for depression symptoms while you’re using Nexplanon. Or they may recommend a different birth control option for you.
  • High blood pressure. Tell your doctor if you have high blood pressure before using Nexplanon. Nexplanon use can increase your blood pressure as a side effect. So, if you already have high blood pressure, Nexplanon can increase your blood pressure to an unsafe level. Your doctor may recommend monitoring your blood pressure more often while using Nexplanon. If your blood pressure increases or becomes uncontrolled, they may recommend a different birth control option.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Nexplanon or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Nexplanon. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. Since Nexplanon is used to help prevent pregnancy, you should not use it during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Nexplanon and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Nexplanon is likely safe to use while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Nexplanon and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Nexplanon, see the “Nexplanon side effects” section above.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.