Remicade (inflixmab) is a prescription brand-name medication. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved it to treat the following conditions:

Remicade comes as a powder that’s mixed with a liquid solution. This is then given by a healthcare professional as an intravenous infusion. The drug is typically used as a long-term treatment.

Remicade is classified as a tumor necrosis factor blocker. It contains the active drug infliximab, which is a biologic. Remicade is available only as a brand-name drug.

For information on the dosage of Remicade, including its form, strength, and how to take the drug, keep reading. For a comprehensive look at Remicade, see this article.

Below is some information on Remicade dosages for the conditions it’s approved to treat.

Remicade form

Remicade comes as a vial of powder that’s mixed with a liquid solution. It’s then given by a healthcare professional as an intravenous infusion. Remicade infusions usually last at least 2 hours.

Remicade strength

Remicade comes in one strength: 100 milligrams (mg).

Typical dosages

Remicade is typically dosed in two stages:

  • The induction stage (also known as a loading dose or starting dose). This stage lasts for 6 weeks. During this time, you’ll get a Remicade infusion at week 0, week 2, and week 6.
  • The maintenance stage. During this stage, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion every 6 weeks or every 8 weeks. You may need an increasing dosage to manage your symptoms, depending on the condition you’re taking the drug to treat.

Remicade injections are given in a clinic or a doctor’s office. The drug can’t be self-administered.

Remicade dosages are determined by weight, and are given as milligrams per kilogram (kg). One kilogram is equal to about 2.2 pounds (lb). Your doctor may use a dosing calculator to help determine what a good level of Remicade is for you. For example, an adult who weighs 80 kg (about 176 lb) may receive 400 mg of Remicade per infusion.

Dosage for psoriatic arthritis

For psoriatic arthritis in adults, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6. Then you’ll get maintenance infusions of 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Dosage for ankylosing spondylitis

For ankylosing spondylitis in adults, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6. Then you’ll get maintenance infusions of 5 mg/kg every 6 weeks.

Dosage for rheumatoid arthritis

For rheumatoid arthritis in adults, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion of 3 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6. Then you’ll get maintenance infusions of 3 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Remicade’s maximum dose for treating rheumatoid arthritis is 10 mg/kg.

Dosage for Crohn’s disease

For Crohn’s disease, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6. Then you’ll get maintenance infusions of 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Remicade’s maximum dose for treating Crohn’s disease is 10 mg/kg.

Dosage for plaque psoriasis

For plaque psoriasis in adults, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6. Then you’ll get maintenance infusions of 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Dosage for ulcerative colitis

For ulcerative colitis, you’ll receive a Remicade infusion of 5 mg/kg at weeks 0, 2, and 6. Then you’ll get maintenance infusions of 5 mg/kg every 8 weeks.

Long-term use

Remicade is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Remicade is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term. But if you’re an adult taking the drug for Crohn’s disease, your doctor may switch you to a different medication if your condition doesn’t respond to Remicade after 14 weeks.

Children’s dosage

Remicade is approved to treat Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis in children ages 6 years and older. The pediatric dosages are the same as the dosages used in adults with these conditions. See the “Typical dosages” section above for details.

Remicade comes as a powder that’s mixed with a liquid solution. This is then given by intravenous infusion. A healthcare professional will give your infusions at your doctor’s office or at an infusion clinic.

Your doctor will go over the infusion protocol (things to do or not to do on the day of your infusion) for Remicade. This may be different depending on where you receive your infusions. The drug’s manufacturer has some general advice for preparing for your infusion and what to expect on the day of your appointment. This includes making sure you’re well-hydrated and dressing in layers in case you get too hot or too cold. Talk with your doctor if you have questions about the Remicade infusion process.

Before your infusion, your doctor may give you medications to reduce your risk for infusion reactions. These are side effects that typically show up within 2 hours of an infusion, such as:

To help prevent infusion reactions, you may be given drugs such as Tylenol (acetaminophen) or a corticosteroid.

Remicade infusions usually last about 2 hours. Infusions are given at the same rate regardless of the condition you’re taking the drug to treat. But your doctor may slow down your infusion if you develop infusion reactions. They may also temporarily stop your infusion to treat your symptoms. If you have a severe reaction, your doctor may have you stop taking Remicade.

The Remicade dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Remicade to treat
  • your body weight
  • how effective Remicade is at treating your condition
  • other medications you take

Other medical conditions you have can also affect your Remicade dosage.

Dosage adjustments

If you have moderate or severe heart failure, your maximum dose of Remicade is lower than usual. (Specifically, 5 milligrams per kilogram of body weight.)

Also, your doctor may slow down your Remicade infusion if you have an infusion reaction. This refers to side effects that can develop during or after an infusion. (See “How Remicade is given” just above for details.)

If you miss an appointment for a Remicade injection, call your doctor’s office or clinic right away to reschedule. Your doctor can also help readjust your infusion schedule for future doses, if necessary.

It’s important to attend all your infusion appointments. Regularly missing doses can cause the drug to be less effective than usual. This may cause the symptoms of the condition you’re taking the drug for to come back or get worse.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

It’s important that you don’t take more Remicade than your doctor prescribes. For some medications, taking more than the recommended amount may lead to side effects or overdose.

If you take more than the recommended amount of Remicade

Call your doctor right away if you believe you’ve received too much Remicade. Another option is to call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. If you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room.

The dosages in this article are typical dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Remicade for you, they will prescribe the dosage that’s right for you. If you have questions about your dosage, talk with your doctor.

Besides learning about dosage, you may want other information about Remicade. These additional articles might be helpful to you:

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.