Tagrisso is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat certain types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in adults.

Specifically, Tagrisso is approved to treat NSCLC that’s EGFR-positive (has abnormal epidermal growth factor receptors).* EGFRs are proteins that can be affected by gene mutations (abnormal changes), helping cancer cells grow.

To treat certain types of EGFR-positive NSCLC, Tagrisso is used as:

  • an adjuvant therapy
  • a first treatment for metastatic cancer (cancer that has spread to other parts of the body)
  • a therapy for metastatic cancer that’s gotten worse during or after treatment with other similar drugs

For more details about the conditions that Tagrisso is approved to treat, see “Tagrisso uses” below.

* For this use, EGFR-positive NSCLC is detected using tests approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).
† An adjuvant therapy is a treatment that helps prevent cancer from returning. It’s usually given after surgery that’s meant to remove tumors.

Drug details

Tagrisso contains the active drug osimertinib. It‘s a targeted therapy for EGFR-positive NSCLC. Targeted therapies block specific proteins that help cancer cells grow and spread. Tagrisso belongs to a group of drugs called EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

Tagrisso comes as an oral tablet. It’s available in two strengths: 40 milligrams (mg) and 80 mg.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Tagrisso, see the “Tagrisso uses” section below.

Tagrisso’s active ingredient is osimertinib. The drug is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Tagrisso can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Tagrisso. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Tagrisso, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Tagrisso, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Tagrisso can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. However, if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Tagrisso. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Tagrisso’s prescribing information.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Tagrisso can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Skin rash and other skin problems

Some people may develop a mild or serious skin rash while taking Tagrisso. It can also cause other skin problems listed below.

In clinical trials, mild skin problems were common with Tagrisso. Serious skin rashes were less commonly reported. To learn more about how often this side effect occurred in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Examples of mild skin problems reported with Tagrisso include:

Examples of serious skin rashes that have been reported with Tagrisso and their symptoms include:

  • Stevens-Johnson syndrome (widespread painful rash affecting the skin and mucous membranes [moist tissue lining your mouth, throat, eyes, nose, and genitals]). Symptoms can include:
    • severe blisters followed by peeling of the skin and mucous membranes
    • fever
  • Erythema multiforme (skin reaction caused by an immune response to a viral infection). Symptoms can include:
    • raised red, purple, or discolored rash affecting the skin and mucous membranes
    • ring-shaped spots that look like targets
    • fever
    • sore mouth, throat, and eyes
  • Cutaneous vasculitis (inflammation of the blood vessels in your skin). Symptoms can include:
    • red, purple, or dark spots on your forearms, lower legs, or buttocks that last over 24 hours
    • large hives or bruises on your body that last over 24 hours

If you have a mild but troublesome skin problem while taking Tagrisso, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to treat the problem.

Some serious skin rashes can be life threatening and may need treatment in the hospital. If you have symptoms of a serious skin rash while taking Tagrisso, contact your doctor right away. Your doctor may recommend you stop taking Tagrisso while they check to see what’s causing the rash. If your doctor confirms you have a serious rash, they’ll have you stop taking Tagrisso permanently.

Lung problems, such as pneumonitis

Tagrisso can sometimes cause serious lung problems, such as pneumonitis and interstitial lung disease (ILD). Pneumonitis is inflammation (irritation and swelling) in the air sacs of your lungs. ILD is inflammation that causes scar tissue to form in your lungs.

In clinical trials, serious lung problems weren’t a common side effect of Tagrisso treatment. To learn more about how often this side effect occurred in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Symptoms of serious lung problems can be similar to symptoms of lung cancer. (Tagrisso is taken to treat certain types* of non-small cell lung cancer). Symptoms may include:

Serious lung problems can be life threatening.If you have any new or worsening lung symptoms while taking Tagrisso, contact your doctor right away. Your doctor may recommend you stop taking Tagrisso while they check to see what’s causing your symptoms. If your doctor confirms you have pneumonitis or ILD, they’ll have you stop taking Tagrisso permanently.

* For more information on the conditions that Tagrisso is taken to treat, see “Tagrisso uses” below.

Hair loss

Some people may have some hair loss or hair thinning while taking Tagrisso. However, hair loss wasn’t a common side effect reported in clinical trials of Tagrisso. To learn more about how often this side effect occurred in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

It’s important to note that hair loss is a common side effect of other cancer treatments. These include chemotherapy and radiation therapy. Your doctor may prescribe these therapies to treat your lung cancer.

If you have hair loss that’s bothersome to you, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to help manage this side effect.

Ocular (eye) side effects

Tagrisso can cause an ocular (eye) side effect called keratitis. Keratitis is inflammation (irritation and swelling) of the cornea (clear front layer of your eye).

Keratitis was a rare side effect in clinical trials of Tagrisso. To learn more about how often this side effect occurred in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Symptoms of keratitis may include:

If not treated, keratitis can lead to the formation of ulcers (sores) or scars on your cornea. This could cause blindness in rare cases.

If you have symptoms of keratitis while taking Tagrisso, contact your doctor right away. They’ll likely refer you to an eye specialist. They may recommend that you stop taking Tagrisso while the condition is treated.

ALLERGIC REACTION

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Tagrisso.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Tagrisso, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

As with all medications, the cost of Tagrisso can vary. To find current prices for Tagrisso tablets in your area, check out GoodRx.com. Tagrisso comes in two strengths: 40 milligrams (mg) and 80 mg. The 80 mg price is generally the same as the 40 mg price.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The cost with insurance depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use. Your insurance company can tell you more about Tagrisso’s cost per month.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Tagrisso. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor, pharmacist, or insurance company.

It’s important to note that you’ll have to get Tagrisso at a specialty pharmacy. This type of pharmacy is authorized to carry specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively.

Before approving coverage for Tagrisso, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Tagrisso, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Tagrisso, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

AstraZeneca, the manufacturer of Tagrisso, offers a program called Access360. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-ASK-A360 (844-275-2360). Or visit the program website.

To learn more about saving money on prescriptions, check out this article.

Generic version

Tagrisso’s active ingredient is osimertinib. The drug is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in a generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Tagrisso.

What is Tagrisso’s effect on life expectancy?

Tagrisso can significantly increase how long people live with certain types* of lung cancer. This is in comparison with a placebo. (A placebo is a treatment containing no active drug.)

For information about how Tagrisso performed in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Keep in mind that results from clinical trials may not predict how you will respond to Tagrisso. The results you have with Tagrisso treatment may depend on:

  • the stage of your lung cancer
  • whether you have other conditions
  • If you take other treatments
  • whether you experience any side effects with Tagrisso treatment

To find out more about what you can expect from Tagrisso treatment, talk with your doctor.

* For more information on the conditions that Tagrisso is approved to treat, see “Tagrisso uses” below.

Are there foods I should avoid while taking Tagrisso?

Certain foods can interact with certain medications. However, this isn’t the case with Tagrisso. There aren’t any foods you need to avoid while taking Tagrisso.

For more information, see the “Tagrisso interactions” section below. If you’re concerned about the foods you eat while taking Tagrisso, talk with your doctor.

Is Tagrisso a type of chemotherapy? Or is it a type of immunotherapy?

No, Tagrisso is not a type of chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Instead, Tagrisso is a targeted therapy for certain types of non-small cell lung cancer. (For more information about this condition, see “Tagrisso uses” below.)

Chemotherapy drugs treat cancer by killing cells that grow quickly in the body. This includes many healthy cells as well as cancer cells. As a result, chemotherapy commonly causes side effects in many parts of the body.

Immunotherapy drugs treat cancer by helping your immune system find and kill cancer cells. Your immune system is your body’s natural defense against disease.

Targeted therapies treat cancer by blocking specific proteins that typically help cancer cells grow and spread. Targeted therapies may have less effect on healthy cells than chemotherapy. However, serious side effects are possible with these treatments. (For more information, see “Tagrisso side effects” above.)

Can Tagrisso cure lung cancer?

No, Tagrisso can’t cure lung cancer. Currently, there aren’t any treatments that cure cancer. Even after successful treatment, it’s possible for cancer to come back.

However, clinical trials showed that Tagrisso can improve survival rates in people with certain types* of lung cancer. These results were in comparison with treatment with a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

In people who took Tagrisso after surgery for lung cancer, Tagrisso was found to increase disease-free survival. (Disease-free survival is the length of time you live without your cancer coming back.)

In people who took Tagrisso for metastatic lung cancer (cancer that’s spread to other parts of the body), Tagrisso was found to increase progression-free survival and overall survival. (Progression-free survival is the length of time you live without your cancer getting worse. And overall survival is the total length of time you live after starting treatment.)

To find out more about what you can expect from Tagrisso treatment, talk with your doctor. For information about how Tagrisso performed in clinical trials, see the drug’s prescribing information.

* For more information on the conditions that Tagrisso is approved to treat, see “Tagrisso uses” below.

What can I expect after stopping Tagrisso treatment?

After you stop taking Tagrisso, the medication will no longer have any effect on cancer cells that may still be in your body. So it’s possible that your cancer could come back or get worse after you stop treatment.

To learn more about what happens after stopping Tagrisso treatment, talk with your doctor.

Note: You should not stop taking Tagrisso without your doctor’s recommendation.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Tagrisso to treat certain conditions.

Tagrisso for non-small cell lung cancer

Tagrisso is approved by the FDA to treat certain types of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in adults.

Specifically, Tagrisso is approved to treat NSCLC that’s EGFR-positive (has abnormal epidermal growth factor receptors).* EGFRs are proteins that can be affected by gene mutations (abnormal changes), helping cancer cells grow.

Typically, the EGFR protein helps healthy cells grow and multiply (make more cells). However, cells with certain mutations in the EGFR gene can create proteins that don’t work correctly. This causes cells to grow and multiply faster than usual, leading to cancer.

Tagrisso is approved as a treatment for NSCLC with specific mutations in the EGFR gene. The drug is approved as:

  • An adjuvant therapy in people whose tumors have specific mutations called exon 19 deletions or exon 21 L858R mutations. An adjuvant therapy is a treatment that helps prevent cancer from returning. It’s usually given after surgery that’s meant to remove tumors.
  • A first treatment for metastatic cancer in people whose tumors have specific mutations called exon 19 deletions or exon 21 L858R mutations. Metastatic cancer is cancer that has spread to other parts of the body, such as the bones, brain, or liver.
  • A therapy for people whose NSCLC tumors have specific mutations called T790M mutations. For this use, Tagrisso is taken to treat cancer that’s gotten worse during or after treatment with other similar drugs.

To find out more about lung cancer and its treatment, visit our MNT lung cancer hub. You can also talk with your doctor.

* For this use, EGFR-positive NSCLC is detected using tests approved by the FDA.

Effectiveness for NSCLC

Tagrisso is an effective treatment for the types of NSCLC described above. It’s recommended in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines to treat early,* locally advanced,† and metastatic NSCLC.

* Early lung cancer is cancer that is only present in the lungs.
† Locally advanced cancer is cancer that has spread into nearby areas, such as the lymph nodes. However, the cancer hasn’t spread to other parts of the body, such as the bones or liver.

Tagrisso and children

Tagrisso isn’t approved for use in children. It’s not known if it’s safe or effective for use in children.

Tagrisso can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Tagrisso and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Tagrisso. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Tagrisso.

Before taking Tagrisso, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you take. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Below are the types of drugs that can interact with Tagrisso.

Drugs that can cause long QT syndrome

Certain drugs can cause long QT syndrome (a type of abnormal heart rhythm). Taking Tagrisso with these drugs can increase the risk of this side effect.* Examples of these drugs include:

Drugs that make Tagrisso less effective

Certain drugs make Tagrisso less effective.Due to this interaction, doctors typically will not prescribe Tagrisso with these drugs. However, if you need to take Tagrisso with one of these drugs, your doctor may prescribe a dose of Tagrisso that’s higher than usual. Examples of these drugs include:

* For more information about this side effect, see the “Tagrisso side effects” section above.

Tagrisso and herbs and supplements

The herbal supplement St. John’s wort can increase the breakdown of Tagrisso in your body. This could make Tagrisso less effective. Due to this interaction, doctors typically will not prescribe Tagrisso with St. John’s wort.

If you need to take Tagrisso with St. John’s wort, your doctor will likely prescribe a dose of Tagrisso that’s higher than usual.

There aren’t any other herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Tagrisso. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products while taking Tagrisso.

Tagrisso and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Tagrisso. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Tagrisso, talk with your doctor.

The Tagrisso dosage your doctor prescribes may depend on:

  • other medications you take
  • any side effects* you may have

The following information describes dosages that are commonly taken or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

* For more information, see the “Tagrisso side effects” section above.

Drug forms and strengths

Tagrisso comes as an oral tablet. It’s available in two strengths: 40 milligrams (mg) and 80 mg.

Dosage for non-small cell lung cancer

The usual dosage of Tagrisso for its approved uses of non-small cell lung cancer is 80 mg once daily.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Tagrisso, skip the missed dose. Take your next scheduled dose as usual. Do not take two doses together or any extra doses to make up for a missed dose. Doing so can increase your risk of side effects. (For more information, see the “Tagrisso side effects” section above.)

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

Will I need to take this drug long term?

For some uses, Tagrisso is meant to be taken as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Tagrisso is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

When it’s prescribed as adjuvant therapy following surgery, Tagrisso is approved to be taken for up to 3 years. (An adjuvant therapy is a treatment that helps prevent cancer from returning. It’s usually given after surgery that’s meant to remove tumors.)

For other uses, you’ll take Tagrisso until you can no longer tolerate side effects from the drug. Or you’ll take Tagrisso until it is no longer effective for your cancer.

Tagrisso is taken to treat certain types of non-small cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR-positive NSCLC). (To learn more about the conditions that Tagrisso is approved to treat, see “Tagrisso uses” above.)

What happens with EGFR-positive NSCLC

With EGFR-positive NSCLC, cancer cells contain abnormal EGFRs. EGFRs are proteins that can become abnormal due to genetic mutations (abnormal changes in a gene) in cancer cells. This helps cancer cells grow.

The EGFR protein typically helps healthy cells grow and multiply (make more cells). However, cells with certain mutations in the EGFR gene can create proteins that don’t work correctly. This causes cells to grow and multiply faster than usual, leading to cancer.

Tagrisso is a targeted therapy for EGFR-positive NSCLC. Targeted therapies are medications that block specific proteins that help the cancer cells grow and spread.

Tagrisso is a type of drug called an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor. It works by attaching to abnormal EGFR proteins in cancer cells. This stops the proteins from sending signals that make the cancer cells grow, multiply, and spread. This is Tagrisso’s mechanism of action (the way a drug works).

How long does it take to work?

You may wonder how you’ll know when Tagrisso is working. The drug starts working soon after you take your first dose, but you might not notice it working. So throughout treatment, your doctor will order various tests to check that Tagrisso is working for you.

There are no known interactions between Tagrisso and alcohol. And drinking alcohol isn’t expected to affect the way Tagrisso works.

However, alcohol might increase certain side effects that you may have with Tagrisso. Examples of these include nausea, diarrhea, and dizziness. And if you have a sore mouth with Tagrisso, drinking alcohol may be painful. (For more information on side effects, see “Tagrisso side effects” above.)

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much, if any, is safe for you to drink while you take Tagrisso.

Tagrisso is a targeted therapy for certain types* of non-small cell lung cancer with epidermal growth factor receptors (EGFR-positive NSCLC). Targeted therapies are drugs that block specific proteins that help the cancer cells grow and spread. Tagrisso targets and blocks certain abnormal EGFR proteins. (To learn more, see “How Tagrisso works” above.)

Other drugs are available that can treat EGFR-positive NSCLC. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Tagrisso, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are prescribed off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when a drug that’s approved by the Food and Drug Administration is prescribed for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

* For more detail about the conditions that Tagrisso is approved to treat, see “Tagrisso uses” above.

Alternatives for non-small cell lung cancer

Examples of other drugs that may be taken to treat EGFR-positive NSCLC include:

  • chemotherapy drugs, such as:
    • carboplatin
    • cisplatin
    • docetaxel (Taxotere)
    • doxorubicin (Doxil)
    • gemcitabine (Infugem)
    • paclitaxel (Abraxane)
    • vinorelbine
  • other targeted therapies, such as:
    • dacomitinib (Vizimpro)
    • gefitinib (Iressa)
    • ramucirumab (Cyramza)
    • necitumumab (Portrazza)
  • immunotherapy drugs, such as:

You should take Tagrisso according to the instructions your doctor gives you.

Tagrisso comes as tablets that you’ll usually swallow.

When to take

Tagrisso is usually taken once daily. You can take your dose at any time of day, but try to stick to the same time each day.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

Accessible labels and containers

If your prescription label is hard to read, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Some pharmacies offer labels that have large print, braille, or a code you scan with a smartphone to convert text to speech. If your local pharmacy doesn’t have these options, your doctor or pharmacist may be able to direct you to one that does.

If you have trouble opening medication bottles, ask your pharmacist if they can put Tagrisso in an easy-open container. They also may be able to recommend tools that can make it simpler to open lids.

Taking Tagrisso with food

You can take Tagrisso with or without food.

Can Tagrisso be crushed, split, or chewed?

No, Tagrisso should not be crushed, split, or chewed. These tablets should usually be swallowed whole. This may be easier if you take them with water or a beverage.

If you have trouble swallowing Tagrisso whole, the tablet can be mixed in water. To do this, stir the tablet into 60 milliliters (mL) of non-carbonated water. Do not crush the tablet or heat the mixture.

You should stir the mixture until the tablet separates into small pieces. (It won’t dissolve completely.) Then make sure you drink the mixture right away. After, you should rinse the container with 120 mL to 240 mL (about ½ to 1 cup) of water and drink it right away. This will ensure that you get your full dose of Tagrisso.

Tagrisso can also be taken via nasogastric tube (a tube that goes from your nose into your stomach). Your doctor or pharmacist can explain how Tagrisso is given this way.

Tagrisso isn’t safe to take during pregnancy. The drug hasn’t been studied in pregnancy. However, based on animal studies and the way it works, Tagrisso is expected to be harmful to a developing fetus.

If you could become pregnant, your doctor will typically have you take a pregnancy test before you start Tagrisso treatment. This is to make sure that you’re not pregnant.

If you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about alternative treatment options for your cancer.

Tagrisso and fertility

Tagrisso may reduce fertility in females and males.* And it could affect your future ability to bear children. The effect of the drug on female fertility may be reversible. However, it’s not known if its effect on male fertility is reversible or permanent.

If you plan to have children, talk with your doctor. It may be possible to store your eggs or sperm for use in future fertility treatment, such as in vitro fertilization.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” and “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Tagrisso isn’t safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re taking Tagrisso.

For more information about taking Tagrisso during pregnancy, see the “Tagrisso and pregnancy” section above.

For females taking Tagrisso

If you’re a female* who can become pregnant, your doctor will likely recommend using birth control while taking Tagrisso. They will also recommend using birth control for 6 weeks after your last dose.

For males taking Tagrisso

If you’re male* and your sexual partner could become pregnant, your doctor will likely recommend using birth control while taking Tagrisso. They will also recommend using birth control for 4 months after your last dose.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the term “female” and “male” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

It’s not known if Tagrisso can pass into breast milk. However, if it does, it could cause serious side effects in a child who’s breastfed. You should not breastfeed while taking Tagrisso. And you should not breastfeed for 2 weeks after your last dose.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to, talk with your doctor about other ways to feed your child while taking Tagrisso.

This drug comes with several precautions. Before taking Tagrisso, talk with your doctor about your health history. Tagrisso may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Tagrisso or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Tagrisso. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Breathing or lung problems. Rarely, Tagrisso can cause lung problems, including pneumonitis (inflammation in the lung). People with current breathing or lung problems may have a higher risk of lung-related side effects during Tagrisso treatment. Your doctor can help determine whether Tagrisso is safe for you to take.
  • Eye problems. In rare cases, Tagrisso can cause a side effect called keratitis (inflammation affecting your cornea). People who already have eye problems may have a higher risk of this side effect if they take Tagrisso. Your doctor can help determine if Tagrisso is safe for you to take.
  • Heart problems. Tagrisso can sometimes cause serious heart problems, such as heart failure and long QT syndrome (a type of abnormal heart rhythm). If you have a heart problem or you’ve had one in the past, you may have a higher risk of these side effects. Talk with your doctor about whether Tagrisso is right for you. If you take Tagrisso, your doctor will likely monitor your heart with an electrocardiogram. Taking certain other medications with Tagrisso may also increase your risk of long QT syndrome. (See “Tagrisso interactions” above for examples.)
  • Electrolyte disturbances. Tagrisso can sometimes cause long QT syndrome. If you have high or low levels of electrolytes in your blood, you may have a higher risk of this side effect. Your doctor will likely monitor your electrolyte levels while you take Tagrisso. If you have any problems with your electrolyte levels, your doctor may prescribe a medication to treat this.
  • Pregnancy. Tagrisso isn’t safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Tagrisso and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. You should not breastfeed while taking Tagrisso. For more information, see the “Tagrisso and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Tagrisso, see the “Tagrisso side effects” section above.

Do not take more Tagrisso than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Tagrisso

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Tagrisso from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to take it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to take can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Tagrisso tablets should be stored at room temperature (68°F to 77°F/20°C to 25°C) in a tightly sealed container. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Tagrisso and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.