Triptodur is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat central precocious puberty (CPP) in children ages 2 years and older.

CPP occurs when a child begins puberty at an earlier age than is typically expected. With CPP, puberty begins before age 9 years in males* and before age 8 years in females.*

For more information about CPP, see the “Triptodur uses” section below.

Drug details

Triptodur contains the active drug triptorelin. It belongs to a drug class called gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists.

Triptodur comes as an extended-release liquid suspension. (Extended-release means the suspension slowly releases the active drug into the body over time.) A healthcare professional will give the suspension as an intramuscular injection in a doctor’s office or clinic.

Triptodur comes in one strength of 22.5 milligrams (mg).

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Triptodur, see the “Triptodur uses” section below.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Triptodur contains the active ingredient triptorelin. The drug is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Triptodur can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur during treatment with Triptodur. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Triptodur, talk with your child’s doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome for your child.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Triptodur, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Triptodur can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. However, if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your child’s doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Triptodur. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your child’s doctor or pharmacist, or view Triptodur’s prescribing information.
† For additional information about allergic reaction, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Triptodur aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your child’s doctor right away if they have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if their symptoms seem life threatening or you think they’re having a medical emergency.

Most of the side effects below were not reported in clinical trials of Triptodur. However, there have been rare reports of these side effects since the drug was approved.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Anxiety. Symptoms can include:
    • excessive and intense feelings of worry
    • restlessness
  • Depression, including suicidal thoughts and behaviors. Symptoms can include:
    • loss of interest in activities that used to be enjoyable
    • changes in appetite or weight
    • thoughts of harming oneself or others
  • Changes in mood or emotion. Symptoms can include:
    • aggression
    • anger
    • crying
    • impatience
    • irritability
  • Convulsions or seizures. Symptoms can include:
    • uncontrollable muscle contractions throughout the body
    • staring blankly into space
    • loss of consciousness
    • clenching the teeth or biting the tongue
  • Intracranial hypertension (a buildup of pressure inside the brain). Symptoms can include:
    • headache
    • vision changes, such as blurry vision, double vision, or loss of vision
    • eye pain
    • dizziness
  • Severe allergic reaction.*

* For additional information about allergic reaction, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Long-term side effects of Triptodur

Long-term side effects weren’t reported in clinical trials of Triptodur. Most of the drug’s side effects are expected to last only a few days or weeks. They should go away after your child’s body gets used to the drug.

Talk with your child’s doctor if your child has long lasting side effects with Triptodur. The doctor can recommend how to manage your child’s symptoms. And they can tell you whether it’s safe for your child to keep receiving Triptodur.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after receiving Triptodur. This side effect wasn’t reported in clinical trials of this drug. However, it has occurred since the drug was approved for use.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under the skin, typically in the eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of the tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your child’s doctor right away if your child has an allergic reaction to Triptodur, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if their symptoms feel life threatening or if you think they’re having a medical emergency.

Suicide prevention

If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:

  • Ask the tough question: “Are you considering suicide?”
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number, or text TALK to 741741 to communicate with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Try to remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours a day at 988. During a crisis, people who are hard of hearing can use their preferred relay service or dial 711 then 988.

Click here for more links and local resources.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Triptodur.

How does Triptodur compare with Lupron Depot-Ped?

Below are a few ways Triptodur and Lupron Depot-Ped are alike and different:

Triptodur*Lupron Depot-Ped†
Useto treat central precocious puberty (CPP) in childrento treat CPP in children
Active drugtriptorelinleuprolide acetate
Drug classgonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist (GnRH)GnRH
How it’s givenintramuscular injection by a healthcare professional in a doctor’s office or clinicintramuscular injection by a healthcare professional in a doctor’s office or clinic
Dose frequencyonce every 6 monthsonce per month or once every 3 months

* For details about Triptodur, see the “Triptodur uses,” “How Triptodur is administered,” and “Triptodur dosage” sections below.
† For more information about Lupron-Depot Ped, see “What’s Lupron Depot-Ped?” in this article.

To learn more about how Triptodur compares with Lupron Depot-Ped, talk with your child’s doctor. They can advise on the best treatment option for your child’s condition.

Will Triptodur affect my child’s growth?

Yes, Triptodur may affect your child’s growth. Triptodur is approved to treat central precocious puberty (CPP) in children.* CPP occurs when a child begins puberty at an earlier age than is typically expected. With CPP, puberty begins before age 9 years in males† and before age 8 years in females.†

Children typically have a growth spurt (rapid increase in height) during puberty. For children with CPP, this growth spurt happens at an earlier age than usual. So, children with CPP are often taller than children of the same age. If CPP is not treated, children with this condition can also stop growing at an earlier age than usual. This could prevent them from reaching their full height as an adult.

Triptodur helps delay puberty for as long as the child receives injections of the medication.‡ By delaying puberty, Triptodur can help slow a child’s growth rate.

It’s important to note that many factors, such as nutrition and genetics, can influence a person’s height. It’s not possible to predict the exact height a child will reach as an adult.

Your child’s doctor will monitor your child’s height and weight during Triptodur treatment. They may also give your child X-rays to track the growth of their bones. These tests can help your child’s doctor understand whether your child’s growth rate is on track with what is expected for their age.

If you have questions about how Triptodur may affect your child’s growth, talk with their doctor.

* For more information about the approved uses of Triptodur, see the “Triptodur uses” section below.
Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.
‡ For details about how Triptodur works, see the “How Triptodur works” section below.

What should I say to my child about their condition during Triptodur treatment?

Triptodur is approved to treat central precocious puberty (CPP). CPP occurs when a child begins puberty at an earlier age than is typically expected. With CPP, puberty begins before age 9 years in males and before age 8 years in females.

Below are a few tips for discussing CPP with your child:

  • Explain the changes that may happen with your child’s body.
  • Assure your child that changes to their body are natural, but these changes may be happening earlier for them than for their friends or classmates.
  • Help prepare your child to answer possible questions from friends or classmates who may be curious about their condition.
  • Provide support, reassurance, and guidance for your child’s questions or concerns.

For more suggestions on how to talk with your child about CPP, see these tips on the Triptodur manufacturer’s website.

As with all medications, the cost of Triptodur can vary. To find current prices for Triptodur in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your child’s insurance plan, your location, and the cost of the visit to the facility where your child gets their Triptodur dose.

Before approving coverage for Triptodur, the insurance company may require prior authorization. This means that your child’s doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about the prescription before the insurance company covers the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Triptodur, contact your child’s insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Triptodur, or if you need help understanding your child’s insurance coverage, help is available via the Triptodur Care Program.

For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 833-401-CARE (2273) or visit the program website.

To learn more about saving money on prescriptions, check out this article.

Generic version

Triptodur contains the active drug triptorelin. Triptodur is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Other drugs are available that can treat your child’s condition. Some may be a better fit for your child than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Triptodur, talk with your child’s doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for this condition.

Alternatives for central precocious puberty

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat central precocious puberty include:

  • histrelin (Supprelin LA)
  • leuprolide (Lupron Depot-Ped)
  • nafarelin (Synarel)

You may wonder how Triptodur compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. To find out how Triptodur compares with Supprelin LA, see this article. You can also talk with your child’s doctor to learn more.

Triptodur is given as an intramuscular injection (an injection into the muscle) at a doctor’s office or clinic. Your child’s doctor or another healthcare professional will inject the drug into the muscle of your child’s buttocks or thigh.

Triptodur initially comes as a powder. Your child’s doctor will mix it with sterile water to form an extended-release liquid suspension (mixture). (Extended-release means the suspension slowly releases the active drug into the body over time.)

If you have questions about how Triptodur is administered, talk with your child’s doctor.

When your child will receive Triptodur

Triptodur is given as one injection every 6 months.

To help make sure that your child doesn’t miss their appointment for a Triptodur injection, try using a medication reminder. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, your child’s doctor will determine the best dosage to fit their needs.

Drug form and strength

Triptodur initially comes as a powder. Your child’s doctor or another healthcare professional will mix it with sterile water to form an extended-release liquid suspension. (Extended-release means the suspension slowly releases the active drug into the body over time.)

Your child’s doctor will give your child the suspension as an intramuscular injection at the doctor’s office or a clinic.

Triptodur comes in one strength of 22.5 milligrams (mg).

Dosage for central precocious puberty

For central precocious puberty (CPP), the usual dosage of Triptodur is one 22.5-mg injection given once every 6 months.

What if my child misses an appointment for a dose?

If your child misses their appointment to receive a dose of Triptodur, reschedule their appointment as soon as possible.

Receiving the medication at the scheduled appointment time helps keep a steady level of the drug in your child’s body. This helps Triptodur work effectively. For this reason, it’s important that your child does not miss a dose of Triptodur. Missing a dose of Triptodur could bring back CPP symptoms.

To help make sure that your child doesn’t miss their appointment, try using a medication reminder. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

Will my child need to receive this drug long term?

Possibly. Triptodur can be prescribed as a long-term treatment. The drug can be given for as long as your child’s doctor recommends. They’ll likely recommend stopping Triptodur treatment at the age puberty is expected to begin. This is typically between ages 9 to 14 years in males* and ages 8 to 13 years in females.*

If you have questions about how long your child will receive Triptodur, talk with their doctor.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Triptodur to treat certain conditions. Triptodur may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is prescribed for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Triptodur for central precocious puberty

Triptodur is FDA-approved to treat central precocious puberty (CPP) in children ages 2 years and older.

CPP explained

CPP occurs when a child begins puberty at an earlier age than what is typically expected.

Puberty is the process of transitioning from childhood into adulthood. It typically occurs between ages 9 to 14 years in males* and ages 8 to 13 years in females.* Changes that happen during puberty are caused by increased levels of certain hormones in the body. Examples of these hormones include estrogen and testosterone.

Below are a few signs of puberty in males and females. With CPP, these signs begin to appear before age 9 years in males and age 8 years in females:

MalesFemalesBoth males and females
Signs of puberty•growth of the scrotum and testicles
•changing voice
•growth of breast tissue
first menstrual period
•growth spurt (rapid increase in height)
•growth of pubic and body hair
body odor
acne
•emotions that are heightened or change often

Effectiveness for central precocious puberty

Clinical trials have shown Triptodur to be effective for treating CPP. For information about how the drug performed in clinical trials, see Triptodur’s prescribing information.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

There isn’t a known interaction between Triptodur and alcohol.

If your child uses medications or products that contain alcohol, talk with their doctor. They can advise whether these products are safe for your child to use while receiving Triptodur.

Triptodur can interact with several other medications. However, it’s not known to interact with specific supplements or foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe. Drug-condition interactions can also cause certain effects. For information about these interactions, see the “Triptodur precautions” section below.

Triptodur and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Triptodur. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Triptodur.

Before your child receives Triptodur, talk with their doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs your child takes. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements your child uses. Sharing this information can help your child avoid potential interactions.

Receiving Triptodur with certain drugs that increase levels of prolactin (a type of hormone) could make Triptodur less effective. Due to this interaction, doctors typically will not prescribe Triptodur with these drugs. Examples include:

Certain other antidepressant drugs could also increase the risk of seizures as a side effect of Triptodur. Before starting Triptodur treatment, tell your child’s doctor if they take any of the antidepressants below. They’ll advise whether it’s safe for your child to receive Triptodur with these medications:

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect your child, talk with their doctor or pharmacist.

Triptodur and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Triptodur. However, you should still check with your child’s doctor or pharmacist before your child uses any of these products while receiving Triptodur.

Triptodur and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Triptodur. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Triptodur, talk with your child’s doctor.

Triptodur and lab tests

Triptodur reduces the level of certain hormones in the body. Examples of these hormones include:

Your child’s doctor may order blood tests to check your child’s hormone levels during Triptodur treatment. This is to make sure the drug is working to treat your child’s condition.

If Triptodur is working, your child’s hormone levels should decrease. And they should remain low for at least 6 to 12 months after your child’s last dose of the drug.

If you have questions about how Triptodur may affect any of your child’s lab test results, talk with their doctor.

Triptodur is approved to treat central precocious puberty (CPP) in children ages 2 years and older.

CPP occurs when a child begins puberty at an earlier age than is typically expected. With CPP, puberty begins before age 9 years in males* and before age 8 years in females.* Increased levels of certain hormones in the body cause changes during puberty. Examples of these hormones include estrogen and testosterone.

Triptodur belongs to a drug class called gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonists. It works by reducing the level of certain hormones in the body that typically increase during puberty. These include estrogen, testosterone, luteinizing hormone, and follicle-stimulating hormone. By lowering these hormone levels, Triptodur helps delay puberty for as long as your child receives the medication.

If you have questions about how Triptodur works, talk with your child’s doctor.

How long does it take to work?

It may take several weeks for Triptodur to start reducing the signs of puberty.

In fact, hormone levels may increase in the first 2 to 4 weeks after Triptodur treatment begins. This increase could temporarily worsen the signs of puberty.

However, hormone levels are expected to decrease over time. As they decrease, the signs of puberty should reduce. These signs should remain low for as long as the child continues to receive Triptodur injections.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Triptodur should not be used during pregnancy.

Triptodur may cause harm to a fetus. This is based on the pregnancy losses that occurred in animal studies and how Triptodur works in the body.

There haven’t been enough clinical trials of Triptodur during human pregnancy to know for certain if Triptodur is harmful. However, due to the possible risk of harm, doctors typically will not prescribe Triptodur during pregnancy.

If your child becomes pregnant while receiving Triptodur, tell their doctor right away.

Triptodur should not be used during pregnancy. If your child is sexually active and they or their partner can become pregnant, talk with your child’s doctor. They can recommend birth control options for your child during their Triptodur treatment.

For more information about receiving Triptodur during pregnancy, see the “Triptodur and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Triptodur can pass into breast milk.

If your child is breastfeeding or planning to do so while receiving the drug, talk with their doctor about the risks and benefits of Triptodur treatment.

This drug comes with several precautions. These are considered drug-condition interactions. Before your child receives Triptodur, talk with their doctor about their health history. Triptodur may not be right for your child if they have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting their health. These include:

  • Seizures. Before starting treatment with Triptodur, tell your child’s doctor if your child has ever had seizures. This could increase the risk of convulsions or seizures as a side effect of Triptodur. Your child’s doctor can advise whether it’s safe for your child to receive Triptodur injections.
  • Mental health conditions. In rare cases, Triptodur may cause new or worsening mental health conditions. Examples include anxiety, depression, and suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Before your child starts Triptodur treatment, tell their doctor if they have any mental health conditions. Your child’s doctor can recommend whether Triptodur is a safe treatment option for your child.
  • Brain problems, including brain tumors. Before starting treatment with Triptodur, tell your child’s doctor if they have ever had brain problems or a brain tumor. Examples of brain problems include stroke and aneurysm. These factors could increase the risk of convulsions or seizures as a side effect of Triptodur. Your child’s doctor can advise whether it’s safe for your child to receive Triptodur injections.
  • Allergic reaction. If your child has an allergic reaction to Triptodur or any of its ingredients, they should not receive the drug. Ask your child’s doctor what other medications are better options.
  • Pregnancy. Triptodur should not be used during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Triptodur and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Triptodur can pass into breast milk. For more information, see the “Triptodur and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Triptodur, see the “Triptodur side effects” section above.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.