Ubrelvy (ubrogepant) is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s used to treat migraine episodes that happen with or without aura in adults.

As with other medications, Ubrelvy can interact with certain other drugs. It can also interact with some supplements and foods. An interaction occurs when one substance causes another substance to have a different effect than expected.

For details about Ubrelvy’s interactions, keep reading. You can learn if there’s anything you cannot take with Ubrelvy and who should not take the drug. For additional information about Ubrelvy, including details about its uses, see this article.

In some cases, a factor or condition could prevent your doctor from prescribing Ubrelvy due to the risk of harm. This is known as a contraindication. The contraindications of Ubrelvy include:

Taking medications known as strong CYP3A4 inhibitors

Taking Ubrelvy with a drug known as a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor may increase your risk of side effects, such as fatigue.* (“CYP” stands for cytochrome P450.) Due to this risk, doctors typically will not prescribe Ubrelvy in combination with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor.

For details about CYP3A4 inhibitors, see “Ubrelvy in depth” below.

Note: Before you start treatment with Ubrelvy, it’s important to tell your doctor if this contraindication applies to you. They can determine whether to prescribe Ubrelvy.

* To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.

Drinking alcohol isn’t known to interact with taking Ubrelvy.

However, alcohol and Ubrelvy can cause some of the same side effects, including nausea and sleepiness.* Combining the two medications could increase your risk of these side effects.

In addition, drinking alcohol while you’re having a migraine episode could worsen your migraine symptoms. And for some people, drinking alcohol is a trigger for a migraine episode.

If you have questions about the risks of consuming alcohol during Ubrelvy treatment, talk with your doctor.

* To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.

Before you start treatment with Ubrelvy, tell your doctor and pharmacist which prescription, over-the-counter, and other medications you take. By sharing this information with them, you may help prevent possible interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Here’s a chart of drugs that can interact with Ubrelvy. Keep in mind that this chart does not include all drugs that may interact with Ubrelvy. Some of these interactions are described in detail just below in “Drug interactions in depth.”

Interaction groupDrug examplesInteraction result with Ubrelvy
CYP3A4 inhibitorsketoconazole
cyclosporine (Gengraf, others)
clarithromycin
can increase the risk of side effects of Ubrelvy*
CYP3A4 inducers• rifampin (Rimactane)
phenytoin (Dilantin)
can make Ubrelvy less effective than usual
BCRP or P-gp inhibitorscarvedilol (Coreg)
• quinidine
• eltrombopag (Promacta)
can increase the risk of side effects of Ubrelvy*

* To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.

Here’s a closer look at certain drug interactions of Ubrelvy.

CYP3A4 inhibitors

Ubrelvy can interact with medications that are CYP3A4 inhibitors. “CYP” stands for cytochrome P450.

Interaction result. Taking Ubrelvy with a CYP3A4 inhibitor may increase your risk of side effects, such as fatigue. To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.

Interaction explained. After you take a dose of Ubrelvy, your system relies on enzymes to break down the drug. (Enzymes are proteins that speed up processes in your body.) Specifically, an enzyme called CYP3A4 is responsible for breaking down Ubrelvy.

Certain medications can affect how well CYP3A4 works. Some medications, referred to as strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, have a strong ability to block the action of CYP3A4. Other drugs, called moderate or weak CYP3A4 inhibitors, block the action of CYP3A4 to a lesser degree.

Taking Ubrelvy with a CYP3A4 inhibitor can cause the level of Ubrelvy to build up in your body. This may make you more likely than usual to develop side effects.

Examples of CYP3A4 inhibitor drugs. Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors include:

Moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors include:

Steps you or your doctor may take. Due to this risk, doctors typically will not prescribe Ubrelvy in combination with a strong CYP3A4 inhibitor.

Before you begin taking Ubrelvy, be sure to let your doctor and pharmacist know about all medications and supplements you take. If they find that any of your medications are strong CYP3A4 inhibitors, your doctor will likely either:

  • recommend that you stop taking the CYP3A4 inhibitor and switch to a different treatment or
  • prescribe a different migraine treatment instead of Ubrelvy.

If you’re taking a moderate or weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, your doctor will likely adjust your Ubrelvy dosage. To learn about Ubrelvy’s dosage, see this article.

CYP3A4 inducers

Ubrelvy can interact with medications that are CYP3A4 inducers.

Interaction result. Taking Ubrelvy with a CYP3A4 inducer may make Ubrelvy less effective than usual at treating your condition.

Interaction explained. After you take a dose of Ubrelvy, your system relies on enzymes to break down the drug. Specifically, an enzyme called CYP3A4 is responsible for breaking down Ubrelvy.

Some medications, referred to as CYP3A4 inducers, can cause your body to make more of the CYP3A4 enzyme than usual. If you take a CYP3A4 inducer with Ubrelvy, the inducer may make Ubrelvy less effective.

Certain drugs have a stronger ability to induce (increase the level of) CYP3A4. These are called strong CYP3A4 inducers. Other drugs with a weaker ability to induce CYP3A4 are called moderate or weak CYP3A4 inducers.

Taking Ubrelvy with a CYP3A4 inducer may make Ubrelvy less able to treat your condition properly.

Examples of CYP3A4 inducer drugs. CYP3A4 inducer drugs include:

Efavirenz (Sustiva) is an example of a moderate CYP3A4 inducer.

Steps you or your doctor may take. Your doctor will likely avoid prescribing Ubrelvy in combination with a strong CYP3A4 inducer. They’ll either:

  • recommend that you stop taking the strong CYP3A4 inducer and switch to a different treatment or
  • recommend a different migraine treatment than Ubrelvy

If you’re taking a moderate or weak CYP3A4 inducer, your doctor isn’t likely to adjust your Ubrelvy dose. However, they’ll probably want to monitor you closely to see whether the drug is effective for treating your migraine episodes.

BCRP or P-gp inhibitors

Ubrelvy can interact with medications that are BCRP or P-gp inhibitors. BCRP stands for breast cancer resistance protein. P-gp is short for P-glycoprotein.

Interaction result. Taking Ubrelvy with a BCRP or P-gp inhibitor could increase your risk of side effects from Ubrelvy. To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.

Interaction explained. After you take a dose of Ubrelvy, your system relies on proteins called enzymes to break down the drug. However, there are also other special proteins that play a role in helping your body get rid of Ubrelvy. Two of these proteins are BCRP and P-gp.

Drugs that are BCRP and P-gp inhibitors may reduce the activity of BCRP and P-gp. If the enzymes are less active than usual, Ubrelvy could build up in your system. This could make you more likely to develop side effects from Ubrelvy.

Examples of BCRP or P-gp inhibitor drugs. BCRP or P-gp inhibitors include:

Steps you or your doctor may take. If you’re taking a drug that’s a BCRP or P-gp inhibitor, your doctor will likely adjust your Ubrelvy dosage. To learn about the dosage of Ubrelvy, see this article.

Ubrelvy may have other interactions, such as with supplements, foods, vaccines, or even lab tests. You’ll find details below. Keep in mind that the following information does not include all other possible interactions with Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy interactions with supplements

Before you start treatment with Ubrelvy, tell your doctor and pharmacist which supplements, herbs, and vitamins you take. By sharing this information with them, you may help prevent possible interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Ubrelvy interactions with herbs

Ubrelvy can interact with certain herbal supplements. One is St. John’s wort. The other is curcumin, which is an ingredient in turmeric.

St. John’s wort. As with certain medications described above, St. John’s wort is a strong CYP3A4 inducer. (To learn more about CYP3A4 inducers, see “Drug interactions in depth” above.) This means that taking St. John’s wort with Ubrelvy can make Ubrelvy less effective than usual.

Due to this risk, doctors will typically recommend that you do not take St. John’s wort if you’re taking Ubrelvy. Your doctor may be able to recommend alternatives to St. John’s wort or Ubrelvy.

Curcumin. Similar to certain medications described above, curcumin can inhibit (reduce the activity of) proteins called BCRP and P-gp. To learn more about BCRP and P-gp inhibitors, see “Drug interactions in depth” above.)

Taking Ubrelvy with curcumin could increase your risk of side effects from Ubrelvy.* If you’re taking a curcumin supplement, your doctor will likely adjust your Ubrelvy dosage. (To learn about the dosage of Ubrelvy, see this article.)

* For information about Ubrelvy’s side effects, refer to this article.

Ubrelvy and vitamins

There are no specific reports of vitamins interacting with Ubrelvy. However, it’s possible that interactions with vitamins could be recognized in the future. Because of this, you should talk with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any vitamin product with Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy interactions with food

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may interact with Ubrelvy.

As with certain medications described above, grapefruit is a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor. (To learn more about CYP3A4 inhibitors, see “Drug interactions in depth” above.) This means consuming grapefruit during Ubrelvy treatment may raise the level of Ubrelvy in your body. The result could be an increased risk of side effects from Ubrelvy, such as nausea.*

If you consume grapefruit or grapefruit juice, your doctor will likely adjust your Ubrelvy dosage. They may also recommend that you avoid taking a second Ubrelvy dose in one day. (To learn about Ubrelvy’s dosage, see this article.)

Your doctor can tell you more about consuming certain foods and drinks during your Ubrelvy treatment.

Note: Although curcumin supplements† may interact with Ubrelvy, foods containing curcumin have not been reported to interact with the drug. (Curcumin is an ingredient in turmeric.) The amount of curcumin in foods would be much less than the amount in supplements.

* To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.
† For more information about curcumin supplements, refer to “Ubrelvy interactions with herbs” above.

Ubrelvy and vaccines

Ubrelvy isn’t known to interact with any vaccines. If you have questions about having vaccines during Ubrelvy treatment, talk with your doctor.

Ubrelvy and lab tests

Ubrelvy and lab tests are not known to interact with each other. Your doctor can help answer any questions about having lab tests while you’re taking Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy and cannabis or CBD

Cannabis (also called marijuana) and cannabis products, such as cannabidiol (CBD), have not been specifically reported to interact with Ubrelvy. However, as with any drug or supplement, talk with your doctor before taking cannabis in combination with Ubrelvy. The impact of cannabis may affect how well you stick to your Ubrelvy treatment plan.

Note: Cannabis is illegal at a federal level but is legal in many states to varying degrees.

Certain medical conditions and other factors may increase the risk of interactions with Ubrelvy. Before you take this drug, be sure to talk with your doctor about your health history. Ubrelvy may not be the right treatment option if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health.

Health conditions or factors that might interact with Ubrelvy include the following.

Liver problems. Your liver helps remove Ubrelvy from your body after you take a dose. If you have liver problems, such as alcohol-related liver disease, Ubrelvy may build up in your body. This could increase your risk of side effects, such as fatigue.* If your liver problems are severe, your doctor will likely suggest a lower Ubrelvy dose for you.†

Kidney problems. After you take a dose of Ubrelvy, your kidneys help remove the drug from your body. If you have a kidney problem, such as chronic kidney disease, the level of Ubrelvy may build up in your system. This can increase your risk of side effects from Ubrelvy, including nausea.*

Depending on the severity of your kidney problems, your doctor may prescribe a different Ubrelvy dose. If you have end-stage kidney disease, they’ll likely not prescribe Ubrelvy.

Pregnancy. It’s not known whether it’s safe to take Ubrelvy while pregnant. You can find some more information about Ubrelvy and pregnancy here. If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor.

Breastfeeding. It’s not known whether it’s safe to breastfeed while taking Ubrelvy. You can find additional information about Ubrelvy and breastfeeding here. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor.

Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Ubrelvy. Taking the drug could cause another allergic reaction. You can ask your doctor about other treatments that may be better choices for you.

* To learn about Ubrelvy’s side effects, see this article.
† For information about the dosage of Ubrelvy, refer to this article.

Here are some frequently asked questions about Ubrelvy and possible interactions.

Is it safe to take Ubrelvy with Zoloft?

Yes, it’s thought that Ubrelvy is safe to take with sertraline (Zoloft). The drug Zoloft is used to treat depression and some other mental health conditions.

Zoloft is a type of medication called a selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI). Other common medications used to treat migraine, called triptans, can interact with SSRIs such as Zoloft.

Taking a triptan and an SSRI together can increase your risk of high levels of serotonin, which could be dangerous. It’s important to note that this interaction is not expected with Ubrelvy.

However, Ubrelvy may interact with the SSRI fluvoxamine, which is considered a CYP3A4 inhibitor. To learn more, see “CYP3A4 inhibitors” in “Drug interactions in depth” above.

If you have additional questions about Ubrelvy and SSRIs, talk with your doctor.

Can I take medication for nausea with Ubrelvy?

It should be safe for you to take medication for nausea with Ubrelvy. If you experience nausea or vomiting when having a migraine episode, your doctor may prescribe nausea medication to ease the symptom. Examples of such drugs are ondansetron (Zofran) and promethazine (Phenergan). Keep in mind that nausea can also be a common side effect of Ubrelvy itself.*

In addition, both ondansetron and promethazine can cause tiredness, which is also a side effect of Ubrelvy. Taking these nausea medications with Ubrelvy could cause you to feel even more sleepy.

If you have any other questions about nausea drugs and Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor.

* For information about side effects of Ubrelvy, see this article.

You can take certain steps to help prevent interactions with Ubrelvy. Your doctor and pharmacist are key resources, so reach out to them before starting treatment. For example, you should plan to do the following:

  • Let them know if you drink alcohol or take cannabis.
  • Tell them about any other medications you take, as well as any supplements or herbs.
  • Create a medication list, which your doctor and pharmacist can help you fill out.

It’s also important to read the label of Ubrelvy and other paperwork that may come with the drug. The label may have colored stickers that mention an interaction. And the paperwork, sometimes called the medication guide or patient package insert, may contain details about interactions. (If Ubrelvy does not come with paperwork, you can ask your pharmacist to print a copy for you.) If this information is difficult to understand, ask your doctor or pharmacist to help explain it.

You can also help prevent interactions with Ubrelvy by taking it exactly as your doctor prescribes.

Besides learning about interactions, you may want to find out more about Ubrelvy. These resources might help:

  • Overview of Ubrelvy. For a general overview of Ubrelvy, you can see this article.
  • Side effects. If you’re interested in the side effects of Ubrelvy, see this article. Another option is to refer to the Ubrelvy prescribing information.
  • Drug comparison. For information about how Ubrelvy compares with Imitrex, read this article. You can also see how Ubrelvy compares with drugs called triptans.
  • Facts about migraine. To learn more about Ubrelvy and migraine, see this article. You can also view our headache and migraine hub.
  • Drug cost. To learn about Ubrelvy and cost, see this article.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.