Xyosted (testosterone enanthate) is a brand-name prescription medication that contains testosterone. It’s used to treat testosterone deficiency (low or no natural testosterone) in adult males* due to certain medical conditions.

Testosterone is an androgen (male sex hormone) that’s responsible for producing male characteristics and sexual function. In males, this hormone is usually made by a pair of organs called the testes (testicles).

Testosterone deficiency can result from a problem with the testicles. This is known as primary hypogonadism. This condition can also result from a problem with the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. This is known as secondary or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism.

Xyosted is a testosterone replacement therapy that’s used to treat both of these forms of testosterone deficiency.

Xyosted hasn’t been studied in males younger than 18 years. It’s only approved for adults.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Drug details

Xyosted contains the active drug testosterone enanthate. It belongs to a class of drugs* called androgens.

Xyosted comes as a solution inside a prefilled single-dose autoinjector. It’s available in three strengths:

  • 50 milligrams (mg) per 0.5 milliliters (mL)
  • 75 mg per 0.5 mL
  • 100 mg per 0.5 mL

You’ll use the autoinjector to give yourself an injection subcutaneously (under your skin) once a week. A healthcare professional will teach you how to do this.

* A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.

Is Xyosted a controlled substance?

Yes, Xyosted is a controlled substance. It’s classified by the Food and Drug administration (FDA) as a Schedule III controlled substance. This means it has a risk for misuse and dependence.

Xyosted is an anabolic steroid drug, and use of such drugs is banned in competitive sport.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Xyosted, see the “Xyosted uses” section below.

Xyosted is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

The active drug in Xyosted is testosterone enanthate. Other testosterone enanthate injections are available, but they aren’t exact copies of Xyosted. They don’t come in an autoinjector and must be administered by a healthcare professional.

If you’re interested in information about other testosterone enanthate injections, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Xyosted can vary. To find current prices for Xyosted in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Xyosted. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Xyosted, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Xyosted, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Xyosted, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Antares Pharma, the manufacturer of Xyosted, offers a copay card that may help lower the cost of its drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-XYOSTED (844-996-7833) or visit the drug’s website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Xyosted may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Xyosted, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic or biosimilar version

Xyosted isn’t available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

The active drug in Xyosted is testosterone enanthate. Other testosterone enanthate injections are available, but they aren’t exact copies of Xyosted. They don’t come in an autoinjector and must be administered by a healthcare professional.

If you’re interested in information about other testosterone enanthate injections, talk with your doctor.

Xyosted can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while using Xyosted. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Xyosted, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Xyosted, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Xyosted can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Xyosted. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Xyosted’s medication guide.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Xyosted aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
Xyosted has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Side effect details

Here are some details on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Increased blood pressure

Xyosted can increase blood pressure.* This could raise the risk for having a heart attack or stroke, which can be fatal. Increased blood pressure was commonly reported in clinical studies of Xyosted. It’s not known how often heart attack or stroke may have occurred in these studies.

A person may have a higher risk for heart attack or stroke if they’ve had one in the past. Having heart disease or risk factors for heart disease also increases risk. These risk factors include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, and smoking.

If you have increased risk for heart attack and stroke, Xyosted may not be a good treatment option. You should discuss the risks and benefits of this treatment with your doctor.

Before you start Xyosted, your doctor will check your blood pressure. If it’s too high, you may need to take medication to lower it.

Your doctor will regularly check your blood pressure while you use Xyosted. If your blood pressure increases, you may need to take medication to lower it. If your blood pressure can’t be managed, you may need to stop Xyosted.

* Xyosted has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Symptoms to watch for

High blood pressure doesn’t usually cause symptoms. But if you have symptoms of a heart attack or stroke, you should call your doctor right away. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Symptoms of a heart attack or stroke can include:

Ways to minimize the risks

Following a healthy lifestyle may help minimize the risks of increased blood pressure with Xyosted. For example, you should try to:

  • exercise regularly
  • eat a healthy diet
  • avoid smoking

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you’re concerned about the risks of increased blood pressure with Xyosted. They can also give you advice on following a healthy lifestyle.

Injection site bruising

After an injection of Xyosted, some bruising may occur in the area of the injection. In clinical studies of Xyosted, bruising at the injection site was commonly reported.

Injection site bruising usually goes away on its own after a few days. Gently massaging the area may help. If you have bruising that’s severe or doesn’t go away, talk with your doctor.

To help reduce the risk of bruising, inject Xyosted into a different place on your belly each time. (This is called rotating injection sites.) Don’t give the injection into areas that are already bruised, red, tender, or hard. And don’t inject into areas that are scaly or have scars or stretch marks.

Blood clots

Xyosted can increase the amount of red blood cells relative to the amount of other cells in the blood. This is called a raised hematocrit. It can thicken blood, which increases the risk of blood clots, such as deep vein thrombosis (DVT) or pulmonary embolism (PE). A DVT is a blood clot in a vein in the leg. A PE is a blood clot in the lungs.

Raised hematocrit was commonly reported in clinical studies of Xyosted. It’s not known how often blood clots may have occurred in these studies.

You’ll have a blood test to check your red blood cell level before you start Xyosted. And you’ll typically have blood tests to check this level every 3 months while using Xyosted. If you have a raised hematocrit, you may need to stop Xyosted until your red blood cells fall back to a normal level. If your hematocrit rises again after you restart Xyosted, you’ll need to stop Xyosted permanently.

Call your doctor right away if you have symptoms of a blood clot while using Xyosted. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency. Symptoms of a blood clot may include:

  • pain, swelling, or warmth in your leg, and possibly redness or discoloration of the skin in this area
  • chest pain
  • shortness of breath
  • coughing up blood

If you have a blood clot, you’ll need to stop using Xyosted. Your doctor will prescribe medication to treat the clot.

If you’re concerned about the risk of blood clots with Xyosted, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Xyosted.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Xyosted, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Xyosted dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on your testosterone levels.

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Xyosted comes as a solution inside a prefilled single-dose autoinjector. It’s available in three strengths:

  • 50 mg (milligrams) per 0.5 mL (milliliters)
  • 75 mg per 0.5 mL
  • 100 mg per 0.5 mL

You’ll use the autoinjector to give yourself an injection subcutaneously (under your skin). A healthcare professional will teach you how to do this. For more information, see the “How to use Xyosted” section below.

Dosage for testosterone replacement therapy

The usual starting dosage of Xyosted for testosterone replacement therapy is 75 mg received by subcutaneous injection once per week.

After 6 weeks of treatment, your doctor will check your testosterone level and adjust your dosage as needed.

What if I miss a dose?

You should inject Xyosted on the same day each week. If you miss your dose on your regular day, take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s nearly time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and take your next dose as scheduled. Don’t take two doses together to make up for missing a dose.

Ask your doctor or pharmacist for advice if you’re not sure what to do about a missed dose.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Xyosted is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Xyosted is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely use it long term.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Xyosted.

Is Xyosted used for bodybuilding?

Xyosted isn’t approved for bodybuilding. However, some bodybuilders may misuse this drug to stimulate muscle growth and improve their performance and endurance. Xyosted is an anabolic steroid (a synthetic version of the male sex hormone testosterone).

Misuse of Xyosted for bodybuilding can have serious side effects, including heart, liver, and mental health problems. It can also stop your body from producing natural testosterone.

Misuse of Xyosted can also lead to drug dependence. This means your body relies on a drug to function normally. To read more about this, see the “Xyosted withdrawal and dependence” section below.

Is Xyosted considered a performance-enhancing drug?

Yes, Xyosted is considered to be a performance-enhancing drug. Some athletes and bodybuilders may misuse Xyosted to promote muscle growth and improve their performance and endurance.

Xyosted is an anabolic steroid drug, and use of such drugs is banned in competitive sport.

Will I need to have lab tests during Xyosted treatment?

Yes, you will. Even before Xyosted treatment, you’ll need to have blood tests. This is so your doctor can check your testosterone level and make sure this treatment is safe for you.

After you start Xyosted, you’ll have more blood tests to check that your testosterone level is in the correct range. You’ll have your first test 6 weeks after you start Xyosted, and from time to time while you use Xyosted. You’ll also have tests 6 weeks after your doctor makes any changes to your dose.

During treatment, your doctor will order various blood tests to check for side effects from Xyosted. For example, your doctor may want to check your levels of:

See the “Xyosted side effects” section above to read about possible side effects of Xyosted.

Xyosted is used to treat testosterone deficiency (no or low natural testosterone) in adult males* due to certain medical conditions.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

What happens with testosterone deficiency

In males, the sex hormone testosterone is usually made by a pair of organs called the testes (testicles). However, certain medical conditions can stop the production of testosterone. As a result, testosterone can fall below normal levels, or the body may have no testosterone at all.

Testosterone is responsible for producing and maintaining male characteristics and sexual function. It also plays a role in other processes of the body. Examples include mood, energy levels, and bone and muscle strength. If you have low or no testosterone, this can cause symptoms such as:

What Xyosted does

Xyosted contains testosterone enanthate, which is a synthetic version of natural testosterone. After you inject Xyosted under your skin, it’s absorbed into your bloodstream. It acts as a replacement for your natural testosterone and helps return your testosterone to normal levels. You’ll have an injection once every week to keep your testosterone at normal levels.

Xyosted has the same effect in your body as natural testosterone. It relieves the symptoms of testosterone deficiency.

How long does it take Xyosted to work?

Xyosted starts to work soon after your first injection. As a result, you may notice some of your symptoms start to ease quickly.

It typically takes about 12 hours for Xyosted to be fully absorbed into your bloodstream after an injection. However, it can take 6 weeks of using Xyosted before your testosterone reaches a steady level.

Other drugs are available that can be used for testosterone replacement therapy. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Xyosted, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Examples of other drugs that may be used for testosterone replacement therapy include:

  • other testosterone injections, such as:
    • testosterone undecanoate (Aveed)
    • testosterone cypionate (Depo-Testosterone)
  • testosterone implant (Testopel)
  • testosterone nasal gel (Natesto)
  • testosterone patch (Androderm)
  • testosterone skin gels, such as:
    • Androgel
    • Fortesta
    • Testim
    • Vogelxo
  • testosterone undecanoate capsule (Jatenzo)
  • methyltestosterone tablets (Android 25)

You should use Xyosted according to your doctor’s or healthcare professional’s instructions.

Xyosted is given by subcutaneous injection (an injection under the skin). It comes in an autoinjector. A healthcare professional will teach you how to use this device so you can give yourself injections at home. Or a caregiver can do this for you.

The Xyosted website has detailed instructions for giving the injection. There’s also an instruction video available on the Xyosted website. If you have any questions about how to use Xyosted, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Injection sites

You should give yourself Xyosted injections under the skin on either side of your abdomen (belly). Alternate between left and right sides of your belly, and use a different site each time you inject Xyosted. (This is called rotating injection sites.)

Don’t give the injection into:

  • an area within 2 inches (5 centimeters) of your belly button
  • skin that is bruised, red, tender, scaly, or hard
  • areas that have scars or stretch marks
  • other parts of your body

When to use

You should use Xyosted once per week, on the same day each week. You can take your dose any time of day.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

When you get Xyosted from the pharmacy, the expiration date will be printed on the carton and on each autoinjector.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Xyosted autoinjectors should be stored at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). If needed, they can be kept for short periods at 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C). Keep the autoinjectors in their carton to protect them from light. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

Right after you’ve used an autoinjector, dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from using the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needle. You can buy a sharps container online, or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Xyosted to treat certain conditions. Xyosted may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Xyosted for testosterone replacement therapy

Xyosted is FDA-approved as a testosterone replacement therapy for adult males* who have hypogonadism (testosterone deficiency) due to certain medical conditions.

Xyosted is used to treat both primary and secondary forms of testosterone deficiency. (For more information, see “About testosterone deficiency” below.) It’s not used to treat low testosterone that can occur as a result of aging (sometimes called the male menopause).

Before prescribing Xyosted, your doctor will order a blood test on at least two separate mornings. This is to confirm you have a low testosterone level.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

About testosterone deficiency

Testosterone is an androgen (male sex hormone) that’s responsible for producing and maintaining male characteristics and sexual function. It also plays a role in other processes of the body. Examples include mood, energy levels, and bone and muscle strength.

In males, the sex hormone testosterone is usually made by a pair of organs called the testes (testicles). With testosterone deficiency, your testes don’t produce enough or any natural testosterone. This means you have low or no testosterone.

Types of testosterone deficiency

Testosterone deficiency can be primary or secondary.

Primary testosterone deficiency (also called primary hypogonadism) results from a problem with your testicles.

This could be due to a congenital condition (a condition present from birth), such as Klinefelter syndrome. Or it could be due to testicular damage resulting from an injury, mumps, chemotherapy, or radiation therapy, to give a few examples. Other causes include undescended testicles and orchiectomy (surgical removal of the testicles), a procedure used to treat testicular cancer.

Secondary testosterone deficiency (also called secondary or hypogonadotropic hypogonadism) results from a problem with the hypothalamus or pituitary gland. These glands are found in your brain. They usually make other hormones that in turn stimulate your testicles to produce testosterone.

Problems with your hypothalamus or pituitary gland can be congenital. Or they can be caused by damage, such as from a head injury, tumor, or radiation therapy.

Symptoms of testosterone deficiency

In adult males, testosterone deficiency can cause symptoms such as:

Effectiveness for testosterone replacement therapy

Xyosted is an effective form of testosterone replacement therapy that helps return testosterone to normal levels.

Testosterone replacement therapy is recommended as a treatment for testosterone deficiency in guidelines from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists. Several different forms of testosterone replacement therapy are available.

To find out how Xyosted performed in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Xyosted and children

Xyosted is not approved for children. It hasn’t been studied in males younger than 18 years.

Xyosted isn’t known to interact with alcohol. However, Xyosted may cause side effects of the liver, though these are rare. Drinking large amounts of alcohol can also affect your liver.

If you drink alcohol, ask your doctor how much is safe for you to drink while you use Xyosted.

Xyosted can interact with several other medications.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Xyosted and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Xyosted. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Xyosted.

Before starting Xyosted, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Types of drugs that can interact with Xyosted include:

  • Diabetes medications. Diabetes medications lower your blood sugar. Using Xyosted can also lower blood sugar. If you have diabetes, your doctor may need to lower your doses of diabetes medication after you start Xyosted. Examples of diabetes medications include:
    • glipizide (Glucotrol)
    • repaglinide
    • alogliptin (Nesina)
    • exenatide (Byetta, Bydureon Bcise)
  • Oral anticoagulants (blood thinners). Oral anticoagulants are taken by mouth to treat or help prevent blood clots. Using Xyosted with these drugs could change their blood thinning effect. So if you take this type of drug, you may need extra monitoring. Examples of oral anticoagulants include:
    • warfarin (Jantoven)
  • Corticosteroids. These medications reduce inflammation (swelling and damage) and are used to treat many different conditions. Using Xyosted with corticosteroids can raise your risk for fluid retention (buildup of fluid). Examples of corticosteroids include:
    • prednisolone (Prelone, Orapred, Pediapred)
    • triamcinolone (Kenalog)
  • Decongestants. These medications relieve a stuffy nose and are found in many over-the-counter cold, pain, and allergy medications. Using Xyosted with decongestants can raise your risk for increased blood pressure. Examples of decongestants include:
    • phenylephrine
    • pseudoephedrine (Sudafed)

Xyosted and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Xyosted. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before taking any of these products while using Xyosted.

Xyosted and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Xyosted. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Xyosted, talk with your doctor.

Xyosted should not be used during pregnancy because it may cause fetal harm. This drug is only approved for males.* Females who are pregnant should not use Xyosted.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Xyosted and fertility

High doses of Xyosted may lower sperm count in some males. This effect may reduce your fertility and could be permanent. Talk with your doctor about the possible effect of Xyosted on your fertility.

Xyosted is not safe to use during pregnancy. Xyosted is only approved for males.* Females who are pregnant should not use Xyosted. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Xyosted.

For more information about using Xyosted during pregnancy, see the “Xyosted and pregnancy” section above.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

It’s not known if Xyosted is safe to use during breastfeeding. Xyosted is only approved for males.* Females who are breastfeeding should not use Xyosted.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warning: Increased blood pressure

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Xyosted can increase your blood pressure. This can raise your risk for having a heart attack or stroke, which can be fatal. You may have a higher risk for heart attack or stroke if you’ve had one in the past. You may also have a higher risk if you have heart disease or risk factors for heart disease. These include high blood pressure, high cholesterol, diabetes, obesity, and smoking. If you could be at higher risk for heart attack or stroke, talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you.

Your doctor will check your blood pressure before you start Xyosted. If it’s too high, you may need to take medication to lower it before you can start Xyosted treatment. Your doctor will regularly check your blood pressure while you use Xyosted. If your blood pressure increases, you may need to take medication to lower it. If your blood pressure can’t be controlled, you may need to stop Xyosted.

Other precautions

Before using Xyosted, talk with your doctor about your health history. Xyosted may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reaction. Anyone who has ever had an allergic reaction to Xyosted or any of its ingredients (including sesame oil) shouldn’t use Xyosted. If you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to Xyosted, ask your doctor about other medications that might be better options for you.
  • Age-related low testosterone. It’s not known if Xyosted is effective for treating low testosterone as a result of aging (sometimes called the male menopause).* Xyosted shouldn’t be used for this purpose due to the drug’s risk of high blood pressure, heart attack, and stroke. If you have age-related low testosterone, talk with your doctor about the best ways to manage it.
  • Breast cancer. Males with breast cancer should not use Xyosted. It could make the condition worse. If you have breast cancer, ask your doctor about other medications that might be better options for you.
  • Prostate cancer. Xyosted can raise the risk of developing prostate cancer. Your doctor should check you for prostate cancer before you start Xyosted. If you have known or suspected prostate cancer, you should not use Xyosted. It could make your condition worse. Ask your doctor about other medications that might be better options for you.
  • Enlarged prostate gland. Xyosted can worsen the symptoms of an enlarged prostate. These include trouble urinating, frequently or urgently needing to urinate, and accidentally passing urine. If you have an enlarged prostate, talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you. If you use Xyosted, tell your doctor if your urinary symptoms get worse.
  • Polycythemia (high number of red blood cells). Xyosted can increase the number of red blood cells in the blood, which raises the risk of blood clots. If you already have a high level of red blood cells, you may not be able to start Xyosted. Your doctor might have you wait until your red blood cell level returns to normal.
  • Heart failure. Xyosted can sometimes cause fluid retention (buildup of fluid) that could worsen heart failure. Talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you.
  • Kidney or liver problems. Xyosted can sometimes cause fluid retention that could worsen kidney or liver problems. Talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you.
  • Sleep apnea. Xyosted could make sleep apnea worse. Talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you. If you use Xyosted, tell your doctor if you notice any changes in your breathing or sleep.
  • History of mental health problems, such as depression or anxiety. Xyosted can sometimes cause mood changes such as depression, anxiety, and suicidal thoughts. If you have a history of mental health problems, talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you. If you use Xyosted, tell your doctor right away if you have any changes in your mood, thoughts, or behavior.
  • Advanced forms of cancer. Certain forms of advanced cancer can lead to high calcium levels. With these forms of cancer, Xyosted could raise the risk of high calcium levels. If you have an advanced form of cancer, talk with your doctor about whether Xyosted is right for you. If you use Xyosted, your doctor may order blood tests to monitor your calcium level.
  • Pregnancy. Xyosted can cause fetal harm and should not be used by pregnant females. For more information, see the “Xyosted and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Xyosted should not be used by females who are breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Xyosted and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Xyosted, see the “Xyosted side effects” section above.

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

Do not use more Xyosted than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you use too much Xyosted

If you think you’ve used too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Xyosted is not known to cause drug dependence when used at the dosage recommended for testosterone replacement therapy.

However, if Xyosted is misused (for example, by athletes or bodybuilders who use high doses to improve performance), this can lead to dependence. With dependence, your body becomes reliant on a drug to function normally. This means you may have withdrawal symptoms when you stop using it.

Misusing Xyosted can stop your body from producing natural testosterone. And if you stop Xyosted after misusing high doses, this can cause withdrawal symptoms such as:

If you have concerns or questions about withdrawal or drug dependence with Xyosted, talk with your doctor.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.