Zegalogue is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people with diabetes. The drug is used in adults as well as children ages 6 years and older.

Severe hypoglycemia may make you too weak or confused to treat yourself, so another person will need to administer Zegalogue to you. Then they should call 911 or the local emergency number. This is because severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency.

Drug details

Zegalogue contains the active drug dasiglucagon. It’s a type of drug called a glucagon analog.

Zegalogue comes as a liquid solution that’s given as a subcutaneous injection. Zegalogue is available in two forms: a prefilled syringe and a prefilled autoinjector. Each form contains a single dose of 0.6 milligrams (mg) per 0.6 milliliter (mL).

FDA approval

In 2021, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Zegalogue to treat severe hypoglycemia in people with diabetes. This condition is usually treated with a hormone called glucagon. Zegalogue is the first glucagon analog that the FDA has approved. A glucagon analog is a drug that’s similar to glucagon and works in the same way.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Zegalogue, see the “Zegalogue uses” section below.

Zegalogue is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Zegalogue to treat certain conditions.

Zegalogue for severe hypoglycemia

Zegalogue is FDA-approved to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people with diabetes. The drug is used in adults as well as children ages 6 years and older.

Severe hypoglycemia may make you too weak or confused to treat yourself, so another person will need to administer Zegalogue to you. The drug increases your blood sugar level. After giving you Zegalogue, the person should call 911 or the local emergency number. This is because severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency.

Diabetes drugs and hypoglycemia

Diabetes is a condition that causes your blood sugar level to become too high. Diabetes is treated with medications that help lower your blood sugar level. But certain diabetes drugs can increase your risk of having episodes of hypoglycemia.

Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar level drops below 70 milligrams (mg) per deciliter (dL).

Diabetes medications that can cause hypoglycemia include insulin and sulfonylurea drugs such as glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL).

Factors that can raise your risk of hypoglycemia with diabetes drugs include:

  • accidentally taking too much insulin or the wrong type of insulin
  • injecting insulin into a muscle instead of under the skin
  • eating a smaller amount of carbohydrates than usual or than expected
  • delaying or skipping meals
  • being more physically active than usual
  • drinking alcohol
  • experiencing stressful events that can affect your blood sugar, such as illness, an accident, or surgery

Early symptoms of hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia can occur suddenly, and it usually causes symptoms. Early symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person, but they may include:

  • shakiness
  • tingling sensations
  • hunger
  • sweating
  • nausea
  • irritability
  • weakness

If you have early symptoms of hypoglycemia, you can usually treat them yourself by eating or drinking something high in sugar, such as hard candy or fruit juice. (For details, see “Zegalogue and food” in the “How to use Zegalogue” section below.) But if you don’t do this soon enough, your blood sugar can quickly drop lower, and your hypoglycemia can become severe.

Some people can have hypoglycemia without having any symptoms. This is called hypoglycemia unawareness. It can put you at risk of severe hypoglycemia because your blood sugar can drop very low without you noticing. Other people at risk of severe hypoglycemia include young children and people older than age 65 years.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia may include:

  • being too weak or confused to help yourself
  • trouble swallowing, which could increase your risk of choking
  • loss of consciousness
  • seizures
  • coma

Severe hypoglycemia may, in some cases, lead to death.

To learn more about diabetes and hypoglycemia, visit our diabetes hub. You can also talk with your doctor and pharmacist.

Effectiveness for severe hypoglycemia

Zegalogue is an effective treatment for severe hypoglycemia. To find out how the drug performed in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Severe hypoglycemia in diabetes is usually treated with a hormone called glucagon. The American Diabetes Association recommends that glucagon is prescribed as an emergency rescue treatment to all people with an increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. Zegalogue is a glucagon analog. It’s similar to glucagon and works in the same way.

Zegalogue and children

Zegalogue is FDA-approved to treat severe hypoglycemia in children ages 6 years and older with diabetes.

Young children with type 1 diabetes have an increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. This is because they may not recognize when they have symptoms of hypoglycemia. Zegalogue is an emergency rescue treatment that can be administered by the child’s parent, caregiver, or teacher.

Zegalogue is not approved for use in children younger than age 6 years. The drug hasn’t been studied in this age group.

Zegalogue can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur with Zegalogue. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Zegalogue, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Zegalogue, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Zegalogue can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few hours to a couple of days. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Zegalogue. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or see Zegalogue’s prescribing information.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Zegalogue aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or the local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects of Zegalogue can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effects in children

Zegalogue is approved for use in children ages 6 years and older.

In clinical studies, side effects of Zegalogue reported in children were similar to those reported in adults who took the drug. These are described above and below. But diarrhea wasn’t reported in children in these studies.

Zegalogue side effects, especially nausea and vomiting, were more common in children ages 12 to 17 years than in younger children or in adults.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Nausea and vomiting

Nausea and vomiting may occur after receiving Zegalogue. In clinical studies, these side effects were very common, especially in children ages 12 to 17 years.

It’s important to note that nausea and vomiting can also be symptoms of hypoglycemia. And it’s possible for your blood sugar to drop again after you’ve received Zegalogue.

After you’ve been given a dose of Zegalogue, your caregiver should move you onto your side. This is to help prevent you from choking if you vomit.

If you have nausea and vomiting after you’ve recovered, check your blood sugar to make sure it’s not too low again. If you have nausea and vomiting that’s severe or doesn’t go away, talk with your doctor right away. These side effects can increase your risk of another episode of hypoglycemia.

Headache

Headache is possible after receiving Zegalogue. This side effect was common in clinical studies of the drug.

It’s important to note that headache can also be a symptom of high or low blood sugar.

If you have a headache after receiving Zegalogue, check your blood sugar to make sure it’s in the right range.

If your blood sugar is in the correct range for you, but you still have a headache that’s bothersome, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can recommend a suitable pain reliever.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after receiving Zegalogue. It’s not known how often this side effect occurred with the medication in clinical studies.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Zegalogue, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or the local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The following information describes Zegalogue dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to use the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Zegalogue comes as a liquid solution that’s given as a subcutaneous injection.

Zegalogue is available in two forms: a prefilled syringe and a prefilled autoinjector. Each form contains a single-dose of 0.6 milligrams (mg) per 0.6 milliliter (mL).

With the autoinjector, the person giving you Zegalogue will press the device onto the surface of your skin. They’ll hold down the autoinjector for 10 seconds until the dose has been given. Your doctor or pharmacist can tell you more about Zegalogue’s forms.

Dosage for severe hypoglycemia

Zegalogue is used to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people with diabetes. This includes adults as well as children ages 6 years and older. The recommended dosage is 0.6 mg, which is one injection.

Because severe hypoglycemia may make you too weak or confused to treat yourself, another person will need to administer Zegalogue to you. This could be a family member, caregiver, friend, coworker, or teacher, for example.

If you don’t respond to the first dose after 15 minutes, they should give you a second dose, if this is available.

After giving you the first Zegalogue injection, the person should call 911 or the local emergency number. This is because severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency.

Children’s dosage

Zegalogue is used to treat severe hypoglycemia in children ages 6 years and older who have diabetes. The recommended dosage is the same as for adults. See “Dosage for severe hypoglycemia” above for details.

What if I miss a dose?

Zegalogue isn’t used on a regular basis, so it’s not possible to miss a dose. The medication is used only when needed to treat low blood sugar emergencies.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Zegalogue isn’t meant to be used as a long-term treatment. It’s used only when needed to treat low blood sugar emergencies.

Diabetes is a long-term condition. If you’re at risk of hypoglycemia and your doctor has prescribed Zegalogue, you should always have a pack of Zegalogue available in case of emergency. Make sure the people you’re in frequent contact with know where you keep Zegalogue and how to use it.

As with all medications, the cost of Zegalogue can vary. To find current prices for Zegalogue syringes or autoinjectors in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for Zegalogue, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Zegalogue, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Zegalogue, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Zealand Pharma, the manufacturer of Zegalogue, offers a copay card to help lower the cost of the drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 877-501-ZEGA (877-501-9342) or visit the manufacturer’s website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Zegalogue may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Zegalogue is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Other drugs are available that can treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar). Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Zegalogue, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat severe hypoglycemia include:

If you have received a dose of Zegalogue, you should not drink alcohol afterward. Drinking alcohol can affect your blood sugar. And for some people, it could increase the risk of having another episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how alcohol can affect your blood sugar. You can ask them when it’s safe for you to drink alcohol after receiving Zegalogue.

Zegalogue can interact with several other medications. Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase the frequency of side effects or make them more severe.

Zegalogue and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Zegalogue. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Zegalogue.

Before using Zegalogue, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Types of drugs that can interact with Zegalogue include:

  • Beta-blockers. Beta-blockers are mainly used to treat high blood pressure. They’re also used for certain heart conditions, including angina (chest pain) and arrhythmias (irregular heart rate or rhythm). Some beta-blockers are also used to help prevent migraine or treat physical symptoms of anxiety. Zegalogue can cause a temporary increase in heart rate and blood pressure in people taking beta-blockers. Examples of these drugs include:
  • Indomethacin (Indocin). Indomethacin is a drug used to reduce pain and inflammation (swelling and damage). Zegalogue may not work to increase blood sugar in people taking indomethacin. It may even worsen hypoglycemia (low blood sugar).
  • Warfarin (Jantoven). Warfarin is a blood thinner drug that’s used to treat and help prevent blood clots. Zegalogue may increase the anticlotting effect of warfarin. Zegalogue could increase the risk of bleeding in people taking warfarin.

Zegalogue and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Zegalogue. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products during your Zegalogue treatment.

Zegalogue and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Zegalogue. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Zegalogue, talk with your doctor.

Your doctor will teach you how and when to use Zegalogue. They can also teach your caregiver, if you have one. Be sure you and anyone who may give you the medication follows these instructions.

Zegalogue is given as a subcutaneous injection with a prefilled syringe or a prefilled autoinjector. Each form contains a single dose.

Zegalogue is used to treat severe hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Because this condition may make you too weak or confused to treat yourself, another person will need to administer Zegalogue to you. This could be a family member, caregiver, friend, coworker, or teacher, for example.

The person will first give you a single injection. (See “Injection sites” below.) Then they should call 911 or the local emergency number because your blood sugar could drop again. Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency. If you don’t respond to the first dose after 15 minutes, they should give you a second dose if this is available.

Make sure that the people you’re in frequent contact with know where you keep Zegalogue and how to use it.This will help them be prepared in case you have a blood sugar emergency.

The Zegalogue website has instructions for using the prefilled syringe and autoinjector.

Injection sites

Zegalogue should be injected just under the skin in one of the following sites:

  • outside of the upper arms
  • lower abdomen (but not within 2 inches of the belly button)
  • front or back of the thighs
  • buttocks

Zegalogue should not be injected through clothing. Any clothing covering the chosen injection site should be rolled back before giving an injection.

When to use

Zegalogue should be used only to treat a blood sugar emergency. You should be given a single dose of the medication if you have symptoms of severe hypoglycemia. These may include:

  • being too weak or confused to help yourself
  • trouble swallowing, which could increase your risk of choking
  • loss of consciousness
  • seizures
  • coma

Talk with your doctor about when you should be given Zegalogue. Make sure family, friends, and other people who may need to give you the drug understand this, too.

Zegalogue and food

After you’ve been given Zegalogue, you should consume something high in sugar as soon as you’re able to eat and drink safely again. This helps prevent your blood sugar from dropping again.

You should have a fast-acting source of sugar first. For example, fruit juice, hard candy, or a glucose tablet. You should also have a long-acting source of sugar, such as crackers with cheese or peanut butter. (A diet soda or a diet or sugar-free candy will not treat hypoglycemia.)

Zegalogue is used to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people ages 6 years and older with diabetes.

What happens with severe hypoglycemia

Diabetes is treated with medications that lower blood sugar levels. But if you take certain diabetes drugs, especially insulin, your blood sugar can sometimes drop too low. This is called hypoglycemia. It occurs when your blood sugar level drops below 70 milligrams (mg) per deciliter (dL). Factors that can raise your risk of hypoglycemia include delaying or skipping meals and being more physically active than usual.

Hypoglycemia can happen suddenly, but it usually causes early symptoms, such as shakiness, tingling sensations, sweating, and irritability.

Most people with diabetes can recognize the early symptoms of hypoglycemia. At this stage, you can usually treat low blood sugar yourself by eating or drinking something high in sugar, such as fruit juice. But if you don’t do this soon enough, your blood sugar can quickly drop lower, and the hypoglycemia can become severe.

Some people with diabetes have an increased risk of severe hypoglycemia. These include young children, people older than age 65 years, and people with hypoglycemia unawareness. With hypoglycemia unawareness, your blood sugar can fall very low without causing any symptoms. As a result, you’re not aware that you need to correct your blood sugar.

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency that, in some cases, can lead to death. Because the condition may make you too weak or confused to treat yourself, another person will need to treat the severe hypoglycemia.

What Zegalogue does

Zegalogue is a medication that another person gives you to help you recover from severe hypoglycemia. The drug is given by injection, and it quickly increases your blood sugar level.

Zegalogue is a type of drug called a glucagon analog. It’s similar to a natural hormone called glucagon.

Glucagon increases your blood sugar level. It does this by instructing your liver to release stored glucose (sugar) into your bloodstream. Zegalogue works in the same way as glucagon. The medication increases your blood sugar level and relieves the symptoms of severe hypoglycemia.

As soon as you’re able to eat and drink safely again, you should eat or drink something high in sugar. This helps replenish the store of glucose in your liver and helps prevent your blood sugar from dropping too low again. For details, see “Zegalogue and food” in the “How to use Zegalogue” section above.

How long does it take to work?

For most people, Zegalogue corrects your blood sugar level within 10 to 15 minutes of receiving an injection. After someone gives you Zegalogue, they should call 911 or the local emergency number. This is because severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency.

If you don’t respond to the first injection of Zegalogue, the person can give you a second injection if it’s available.

It’s not known if Zegalogue is safe to use during pregnancy. The drug hasn’t been studied in pregnant humans.

Doses of Zegalogue higher than those used in humans have been studied in animals. When the drug was given to pregnant animals in these studies, very high doses of Zegalogue caused effects such as low birth weight. Lower doses of Zegalogue didn’t cause the same effects. But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

It’s important to note that if severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) isn’t treated, it can cause serious complications in pregnancy. It can also lead to the death of both the pregnant person and fetus. (Zegalogue is used to treat severe hypoglycemia.)

If you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of Zegalogue.

It’s not known if Zegalogue is safe to use during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Zegalogue.

For more information about Zegalogue and pregnancy, see the “Zegalogue and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known for certain if Zegalogue is safe to use during breastfeeding. The drug hasn’t been studied in people who are breastfeeding. It’s not known if Zegalogue passes into breast milk or if it can affect a child who is breastfed. But the drug is likely to be broken down by the digestive system if it’s swallowed. So if Zegalogue does pass into breast milk, it’s unlikely to affect a child who is breastfed.

If you’re breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about the best way to feed your child after receiving a dose of Zegalogue.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Zegalogue.

Why does emergency medical help need to be called after Zegalogue is given?

You may need medical help after receiving Zegalogue because it’s possible that your blood sugar level could fall again.

After someone gives you an injection of Zegalogue, they should call 911 or the local emergency number. Even if Zegalogue raises your blood sugar level at first, it could drop afterward. Severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) is a medical emergency. If the condition isn’t treated correctly, in some cases, it can lead to death.

If you have questions about how Zegalogue is given and how emergency responders would help you, talk with your doctor.

Is Zegalogue glucose?

No, Zegalogue is not glucose.

Glucose is a form of sugar that you can take by mouth if you have early symptoms of mild hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Examples of glucose in this situation include fruit juices and sodas that contain sugar.* Your bloodstream quickly absorbs the glucose from your digestive system, increasing your blood sugar level.

Zegalogue is a type of drug called a glucagon analog. It’s similar to a natural hormone called glucagon. Zegalogue rapidly increases your blood sugar level. The drug does this by instructing your liver to release stored glucose into your bloodstream.

Zegalogue is used to treat severe hypoglycemia, where you may be too weak or confused to treat yourself. You should not use Zegalogue for mild hypoglycemia that can be treated with glucose.

If you’d like to learn more about when to use glucose and when Zegalogue should be given, talk with your doctor.

* A diet soda or a diet or sugar-free candy will not treat hypoglycemia.

How long after giving a dose of Zegalogue do I need to wait before giving another injection?

If you have given an injection of Zegalogue to someone with severe hypoglycemia, you should wait 15 minutes to see if they recover. If they don’t recover within 15 minutes, you should give them a second injection if one is available.

Be sure to call 911 or the local emergency number after giving the first injection of Zegalogue.

If you have additional questions about how to administer Zegalogue, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Before using Zegalogue, talk with your doctor about your health history. Zegalogue may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • A tumor called a pheochromocytoma. Zegalogue can affect a type of adrenal gland tumor called a pheochromocytoma. The drug can cause this tumor to release hormones that could lead to a dangerous increase in blood pressure. Due to this risk, doctors typically will not prescribe Zegalogue if you have a pheochromocytoma. Ask your doctor what other medications may be better options for you.
  • A tumor called an insulinoma. Zegalogue can affect a type of a tumor in your pancreas called an insulinoma. The drug could cause this tumor to release large amounts of insulin, which could worsen hypoglycemia. Due to this risk, doctors typically will not prescribe Zegalogue if you have an insulinoma. Talk with your doctor about other treatment options.
  • Allergic reaction. If you have had an allergic reaction to Zegalogue or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Zegalogue. Ask them what other medications may be better choices for you.
  • Prolonged fasting or starvation. If you haven’t had anything to eat or drink for a long time, Zegalogue may not be able to increase your blood sugar level. The drug works by making your liver release stored glucose (sugar). But with prolonged fasting or starvation, your liver may not have enough stored glucose. In these situations, hypoglycemia should be treated with glucose rather than Zegalogue.
  • Adrenal insufficiency. Zegalogue works by making your liver release stored glucose. But if your adrenal glands don’t work well, you might not have much glucose stored in your liver. In this case, Zegalogue may not work to increase your blood sugar level. If you have adrenal insufficiency, hypoglycemia should be treated with glucose rather than Zegalogue.
  • Long-term hypoglycemia. Zegalogue works by making your liver release stored glucose. But if you have had hypoglycemia for a long time, you might not have much glucose stored in your liver. In this case, Zegalogue may not work to increase your blood sugar level. Long-term hypoglycemia should be treated with glucose rather than Zegalogue.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Zegalogue is safe to use during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Zegalogue and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known for sure if Zegalogue is safe to use during breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Zegalogue and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Zegalogue, see the “Zegalogue side effects” section above.

Receiving more than the recommended dosage of Zegalogue can lead to serious side effects. You should advise whoever may give you the medication to not use more of the drug than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

After giving you a dose of Zegalogue, the person should call 911 or the local emergency number. This is because severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency. If they think they gave you too much of the drug, they should tell the emergency responders.

When you get Zegalogue from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the packaging. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store Zegalogue in a refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Be sure to keep the box away from the cooling element to help prevent it from freezing. You should not use Zegalogue if it has been frozen. When stored in a refrigerator, Zegalogue is good until the expiration date printed on the packaging.

You can also store Zegalogue at room temperature between 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C) for up to 12 months. In this case, you should keep Zegalogue in its protective case, away from light. When you remove Zegalogue from the refrigerator, be sure to write the date you remove it in the space provided on the protective case. You should not return Zegalogue to the refrigerator if you have kept it at room temperature.

If you store Zegalogue at room temperature, you should dispose of it after 12 months, or after its expiration date passes, whichever comes first.

Disposal

Right after you have used a prefilled syringe or autoinjector for Zegalogue, dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from using the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needle. You can buy a sharps container online, or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.