Haegarda is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to prevent sudden, painful swelling in people with hereditary angioedema (HAE). Haegarda can be used in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

With HAE, you may have low levels of a protein called C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Or, you may have C1-INH that doesn’t work properly. This condition causes episodes of sudden, painful, and severe swelling, which are also called HAE attacks.

Haegarda contains the C1-INH protein, which is found naturally in human blood. This protein plays an important role in how your body regulates swelling. Haegarda works to prevent HAE attacks by helping your body keep steady levels of C1-INH.

Haegarda comes as a powder inside vials. It’s mixed with sterile water and taken twice weekly as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under your skin). Your doctor will show you how to administer the drug to yourself.

FDA approval

In 2017, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Haegarda to prevent sudden, painful swelling in people with HAE. At first, Haegarda was only approved for this use in adults and children ages 12 years and older.

But later, in 2020, the FDA approved Haegarda for use in adults and children ages 6 years and older. Haegarda became the first drug that’s injected under the skin to prevent HAE attacks in children ages 6 years and older.

Effectiveness

In clinical studies, Haegarda was effective in preventing HAE attacks. To learn about the effectiveness of Haegarda, see the “Haegarda uses” section below.

Haegarda contains the C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) protein, which is found naturally in human blood. It’s a biologic drug that’s available only as a brand-name medication. It doesn’t come in a biosimilar form.

A biologic drug is made from living cells, while other drugs are made from chemicals. Drugs made from chemicals can have generics, which are exact copies of the active drug in the brand-name medication. Biologics, on the other hand, can’t be copied exactly. So, instead of a generic, biologics have biosimilars. Biosimilars are “similar” to the parent drug, and they’re considered to be just as effective and safe.

Like generics, biosimilars are often less expensive than brand-name medications.

The Haegarda dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Haegarda to treat
  • your weight
  • any other medical conditions you may have

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Haegarda comes as a powder inside vials that each contain either 2,000 or 3,000 units of the drug.

Haegarda powder is mixed with sterile water before it’s given as an injection. The drug comes in kits that contain the correct amount of sterilized water needed for each dose.

You’ll take Haegarda as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under your skin). Your doctor will show you how to administer the drug to yourself.

Dosage for hereditary angioedema

The recommended dosage of Haegarda to prevent HAE attacks* is 60 units of drug per kilogram (kg)† of body weight. This dose is given twice weekly (once every 3 to 4 days).

For example, if a person weighs 145 pounds (66 kg), their Haegarda dose would be about 4,000 units.

* With hereditary angioedema (HAE), you can have HAE attacks. During these attacks, you’ll have sudden, painful, and severe swelling.
† One kg is about equal to 2.2 pounds.

Pediatric dosage

Haegarda is approved to prevent HAE attacks* in children ages 6 years and older. The recommended dosage of Haegarda for children is the same as that for adults. For specific dosing information, see the “Dosage for hereditary angioedema” section above.

* With hereditary angioedema (HAE), you can have HAE attacks. During these attacks, you’ll have sudden, painful, and severe swelling.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Haegarda, administer your missed dose as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next dose, skip the missed dose and administer your next dose as usual. Be sure to talk with your doctor right away if you miss a dose of Haegarda.

Also, don’t take more than one dose of Haegarda at a time. Doing so could increase your risk of side effects from the drug.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A kitchen timer may be useful, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Haegarda is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Haegarda is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Haegarda can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while using Haegarda. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Haegarda, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks the side effects of drugs it has approved. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Haegarda, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Haegarda, which are each described in the “Side effect details” section below, can include:*

  • injection site reactions
  • dizziness
  • a runny or stuffy nose

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Haegarda. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist or check Haegarda’s prescribing information.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Haegarda aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* This serious side effect is explained further in the “Side effect details” section below.

Side effects in children

Haegarda is approved to prevent HAE attacks* in children ages 6 years and older. The side effects of Haegarda in children are similar to those in adults. For more information, see the “Mild side effects” and “Serious side effects” sections above.

* With hereditary angioedema (HAE), you can have HAE attacks. During these attacks, you’ll have sudden, painful, and severe swelling.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have a hypersensitivity reaction (allergic reaction) while or after taking Haegarda.

In clinical studies, a hypersensitivity reaction occurred in:

  • 6% of adults and children taking Haegarda
  • 1% of adults and children taking a placebo (treatment with no active drug)

Symptoms of a mild hypersensitivity reaction can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)

A more severe hypersensitivity reaction is possible. Symptoms of a severe reaction can include:

  • chest tightness
  • a drop in blood pressure
  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing
  • wheezing

Stop using Haegarda and call your doctor right away if you have a severe hypersensitivity reaction. But call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Also, when using Haegarda, make sure you have epinephrine available to you to treat a severe hypersensitivity reaction. In case of an emergency, you or a caregiver should understand how to administer epinephrine. Talk with your doctor to learn more about using epinephrine with Haegarda.

Injection site reactions

It’s common to have pain, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin around your Haegarda injection sites. These reactions are also called injection site reactions.

In clinical studies, 31% of adults and children taking Haegarda had an injection site reaction. Of these reactions:

  • 95% were mild reactions
  • 83% resolved within 1 day

In the studies, of the adults and children who received a placebo injection, 24% had an injection site reaction. (A placebo is a treatment with no active drug.) It’s not known how severe these injection site reactions were or how quickly they resolved.

If you have an injection site reaction while taking Haegarda, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to help relieve pain, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin around your injection sites.

Dizziness

It’s possible to feel dizzy while you’re using Haegarda. In clinical studies, dizziness occurred in:

  • 5% of adults and children taking Haegarda
  • 1% of adults and children taking a placebo (treatment with no active drug)

If you have dizziness that’s bothersome while you’re taking Haegarda, talk with your doctor. They may recommend ways to help reduce this side effect.

Runny or stuffy nose

You may have a runny or stuffy nose (nasopharyngitis) while you’re using Haegarda. In clinical studies, nasopharyngitis occurred in:

  • 11% of adults and children taking Haegarda
  • 7% of adults and children taking a placebo (treatment with no active drug)

If you have nasopharyngitis while you’re using Haegarda, talk with your doctor. They can recommend ways to help relieve your symptoms.

You should use Haegarda according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions. Don’t use Haegarda unless you’ve received training from a healthcare provider.

Haegarda comes as a powder inside vials. This powder is mixed with sterile water before it’s given as an injection. The drug comes in kits that contain the correct amount of sterilized water needed for each dose.

You’ll take Haegarda as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under your skin). Your doctor will show you how to administer the drug to yourself. For step-by-step instructions on how to mix and inject Haegarda, visit the drug manufacturer’s website.

When to use

Haegarda should be used twice weekly (once every 3 to 4 days). You should try to give your doses at the same time each day and on the same days every week.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A kitchen timer may be useful, too.

Other drugs are available that can manage hereditary angioedema (HAE). Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Haegarda, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Some drugs treat HAE attacks,* while others, such as Haegarda, prevent HAE attacks. Examples of other drugs that may be used to manage HAE include:

* With hereditary angioedema (HAE), you can have HAE attacks. During these attacks, you’ll have sudden, painful, and severe swelling.
† C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) is a protein that’s found naturally inside your body. With HAE, you may have low levels of C1-INH, or you may have C1-INH that doesn’t work properly.

You may wonder how Haegarda compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Below, we look at how Haegarda and Berinert are alike and different.

Ingredients

Both Haegarda and Berinert contain C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). This is a protein that’s found naturally in human blood.

Uses

Haegarda and Berinert are both used to manage hereditary angioedema (HAE) in adults and children ages 6 years and older. With HAE, you can have attacks that cause sudden, painful, and severe swelling. For more information about this condition, see the “Haegarda uses” section below.

Haegarda is approved to prevent HAE attacks. But the drug shouldn’t be used to treat HAE attacks when they’re occurring.

Berinert, on the other hand, is approved to treat HAE attacks when they’re happening. The drug hasn’t been studied for use in preventing HAE attacks.

Drug forms and administration

Both Haegarda and Berinert come as powders that are mixed with sterile water before they’re given as injections.

Haegarda is taken twice weekly as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under your skin). Your doctor will show you how to administer the drug to yourself.

Berinert is given as a single dose when needed for HAE attacks. It’s given as an intravenous (IV) injection (an injection into a vein). You may receive Berinert from a healthcare provider. Or, if your doctor thinks it’s appropriate and you’ve received training, you can administer the drug to yourself.

Side effects and risks

Haegarda and Berinert both contain C1-INH. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones, too. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug.

  • Can occur with Haegarda:
    • injection site reactions
    • dizziness
    • a runny or stuffy nose
  • Can occur with Berinert:
    • an unpleasant taste (dysgeusia) that lasts for a long time
  • Can occur with both Haegarda and Berinert:
    • no shared common mild side effects

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Berinert or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Haegarda:
    • no unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with Berinert:
    • pain related to HAE attacks that’s more severe than usual
  • Can occur with both Haegarda and Berinert:

Effectiveness

Haegarda and Berinert have different approved uses, but they’re both used to manage HAE.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. But separate studies have found both Haegarda and Berinert to be effective in managing HAE.

Costs

According to estimates on WellRx.com, Haegarda costs less than Berinert. But because Haegarda is supposed to be used regularly, it may cost more than Berinert over time. (Berinert is used only during HAE attacks.)

Haegarda and Berinert are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic or biosimilar forms of either drug. (For information about what generics and biosimilars are, see the “Haegarda generic or biosimilar” section above.) Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

Like Berinert (discussed above), other medications are prescribed for similar uses as Haegarda. Below, we look at how Haegarda and Cinryze are alike and different.

Ingredients

Both Haegarda and Cinryze contain C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH), which is a protein that’s found naturally in human blood.

Uses

Haegarda and Cinryze are both approved to prevent hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

With HAE, you can have attacks that cause sudden, painful, and severe swelling. For more information about this condition, see the “Haegarda uses” section below.

Drug forms and administration

Both Haegarda and Cinryze come as powders that are mixed with sterile water before they’re given as injections.

Haegarda is taken twice weekly as a subcutaneous injection (an injection under your skin). Your doctor will show you how to administer the drug to yourself.

Cinryze is given once every 3 to 4 days as an intravenous (IV) injection (an injection into your vein). You may receive Cinryze from a healthcare provider. Or, if your doctor thinks it’s appropriate and you’ve received training, you can administer the drug to yourself.

Side effects and risks

Haegarda and Cinryze both contain C1-INH. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones, too. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug.

  • Can occur with Haegarda:
    • injection site reactions
    • dizziness
    • a runny or stuffy nose
  • Can occur with Cinryze:
    • fever
    • headache
    • nausea and vomiting
    • rash
  • Can occur with both Haegarda and Cinryze:
    • no shared common mild side effects

Serious side effects

Serious side effects that can occur with both Haegarda and Cinryze (when taken individually) include:

Effectiveness

The only condition that both Haegarda and Cinryze are used for is HAE. They help prevent HAE attacks.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. But separate studies have found both Haegarda and Cinryze to be effective in preventing HAE attacks.

Costs

According to estimates on WellRx.com, Haegarda costs significantly less than Cinryze. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Haegarda and Cinryze are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic or biosimilar forms of either drug. (For information about what generics and biosimilars are, see the “Haegarda generic or biosimilar” section above.) Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Haegarda to treat certain conditions.

Haegarda for hereditary angioedema

Haegarda is FDA-approved to prevent hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks. The drug can be used in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

HAE is a genetic disorder. It causes episodes of sudden, painful, and severe swelling, which are also called HAE attacks. Swelling related to HAE most commonly occurs in the:

  • airway
  • arms and legs
  • eyes
  • face
  • gastrointestinal tract (stomach, large intestine, or small intestine)
  • lips

Swelling caused by HAE can go away on its own, but it may last for several days. Swelling in your gastrointestinal tract may cause belly pain, diarrhea, nausea, or vomiting. However, swelling in your airway can be life threatening and may require rescue treatments.*

With HAE, you may have low levels of a protein called C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Or, you may have C1-INH that doesn’t work properly.

Haegarda contains the C1-INH protein, which is found naturally in human blood. This protein plays an important role in your body’s regulation of swelling. Haegarda works to prevent HAE attacks by helping your body keep steady levels of C1-INH.

* “Rescue treatments” for HAE are drugs that are used to treat HAE attacks as they’re happening. For examples of rescue treatments that can be used for HAE attacks, see the “Haegarda use with other drugs” section below.

Effectiveness for hereditary angioedema

In clinical studies, Haegarda was effective in preventing HAE attacks.

One study compared Haegarda with a placebo (treatment with no active drug). The study included adults and children ages 12 years and older. People received Haegarda for 16 weeks, then they took the placebo for an additional 16 weeks.

The following results were seen:

  • while they were taking Haegarda, people had an average of 0.5 to 1.2 HAE attacks per month
  • while they were taking the placebo, people had an average of 3.6 to 4.0 HAE attacks per month

Between 76% and 90% of people who took Haegarda responded to the drug. This meant that their number of HAE attacks reduced by at least 50%. For example, compared with placebo treatment, HAE attacks reduced by 89% to 95% with Haegarda treatment.

It’s not known how many people who took placebo had their number of HAE attacks reduced by at least 50%.

While taking Haegarda, 38% to 40% of people didn’t have an HAE attack. But it’s not known how many people didn’t have an HAE attack while taking the placebo.

People in this study also used rescue medication as needed while taking either the placebo or Haegarda. Their rescue medications were needed:

  • between 0.3 and 1.1 times each month while taking Haegarda
  • between 3.9 and 5.6 times each month while taking the placebo

Another study looked at adults and children ages 8 years and older who received Haegarda for up to 2 years. While taking Haegarda, 93.1% of people in this study had their number of HAE attacks reduced by at least 50%.

Additionally, during treatment, the following results were seen:

  • between 79.7% and 86.9% of people had fewer than one HAE attack per month
  • people had an average of only one HAE attack per year
  • the use of rescue medication wasn’t needed

Haegarda and children

In clinical studies, Haegarda was effective in preventing HAE attacks in children. For information on the drug’s effectiveness, see the “Effectiveness for hereditary angioedema” section above.

If you’re interested in giving Haegarda to a child, talk with their doctor.

Haegarda is used to prevent hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks. With HAE attacks, you have episodes of sudden, painful, and severe swelling.

Haegarda with rescue medications

Even with treatment to prevent HAE attacks, the attacks may still occur. Haegarda shouldn’t be used to treat HAE attacks when they’re happening. Instead, your doctor will prescribe a rescue medication for you to use when HAE attacks are happening.

Examples of rescue treatments for HAE attacks include:

  • C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert)
  • ecallantide (Kalbitor)
  • icatibant (Firazyr)

If you have questions about the rescue medication that’s best for you, talk with your doctor.

Haegarda with epinephrine

When using Haegarda, make sure you have epinephrine available to you to treat a severe allergic reaction that may occur with Haegarda. (For more information about allergic reactions, see the “Haegarda side effects” section above.)

In case of an emergency, you or a caregiver should understand how to administer epinephrine. Talk with your doctor to learn more about using epinephrine with Haegarda.

There aren’t any known interactions between alcohol and Haegarda.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about the risks of drinking while you’re using Haegarda.

Haegarda isn’t known to interact with other medications, herbs, supplements, or foods. However, that doesn’t mean that interactions aren’t possible.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Before taking Haegarda, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help prevent potential interactions.

If you have questions about interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

As with all medications, the cost of Haegarda can vary. To find current prices for Haegarda in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

It’s important to note that you’ll have to get Haegarda at a specialty pharmacy. This type of pharmacy is authorized to carry specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively.

Before approving coverage for Haegarda, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Haegarda, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Haegarda, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

CSL Behring LLC., the manufacturer of Haegarda, offers a program called Haegarda Connect. This program may offer help with copay assistance for people with commercial insurance. The program may also offer cost savings to people who don’t have insurance coverage on Haegarda.

For more information about Haegarda Connect, and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-HAEGARDA (844-423-4273) or visit the program website.

Generic or biosimilar version

Haegarda contains the C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH) protein, which is found naturally in human blood. It’s a biologic drug that’s available only as a brand-name medication. It doesn’t come in a biosimilar form.

A biologic drug is made from living cells, while other drugs are made from chemicals. Drugs made from chemicals can have generics, which are exact copies of the active drug in the brand-name medication. Biologics, on the other hand, can’t be copied exactly. So, instead of a generic, biologics have biosimilars. Biosimilars are “similar” to the parent drug, and they’re considered to be just as effective and safe.

Like generics, biosimilars are often less expensive than brand-name medications.

Haegarda is approved to prevent hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks, which are described just below. Haegarda can be used in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

What HAE is

HAE is a genetic disorder that causes episodes of sudden, severe, and painful swelling. These episodes are also called HAE attacks.

With HAE, your blood vessels and capillaries (tiny blood vessels) leak fluid into areas surrounding them. This causes the swelling and pain that occur during an HAE attack.

With HAE, you may have low levels of a protein called C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). Or, you may have C1-INH that doesn’t work properly.

What Haegarda does

Haegarda contains the C1-INH protein, which is found naturally in human blood. This protein plays an important role in your body’s regulation of swelling.

Haegarda works by raising the levels of C1-INH in your body. Higher levels of C1-INH can prevent HAE attacks by keeping your blood vessels and capillaries from leaking.

How long does it take to work?

Haegarda starts working right away to prevent HAE attacks. However, it may take several doses of the drug before your C1-INH levels become steady.

It’s not known if Haegarda is safe to use during pregnancy. This drug hasn’t been specifically studied during pregnancy.

However, one clinical study of Haegarda did include four women who were pregnant. These women received Haegarda for up to 8 weeks during their first 3 months of pregnancy. All of the women delivered healthy babies. And they didn’t report any problems during pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking Haegarda.

It’s not known if Haegarda is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Haegarda.

For more information about taking Haegarda during pregnancy, see the “Haegarda and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Haegarda can pass into human breast milk. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Haegarda.

Here are the answers to some frequently asked questions about Haegarda.

Will I be able to give injections of Haegarda to myself?

Yes, you’ll most likely be able to give injections of Haegarda to yourself. It may take some time for you to become comfortable giving the injections to yourself. But self-administration will become easier over time.

Your doctor will show you how to inject your doses of Haegarda. Don’t try to self-administer the drug unless you’ve received training from your doctor.

Can I use Haegarda if I’m having an attack of hereditary angioedema?

No, Haegarda should not be used to treat hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks. Instead, the drug is used to prevent these attacks from occurring. (With HAE attacks, you have episodes of sudden, severe, and painful swelling.)

To treat HAE attacks while they’re happening, you’ll use a rescue medication. For information on rescue medications for HAE, see the “Haegarda use with other drugs” section above.

Be sure to talk with your doctor about the rescue medication that’s best for you.

Is Haegarda safe for older people to use?

Yes, in general, Haegarda is safe for older people to use. Haegarda has been studied in people up to 72 years of age. And these studies showed that Haegarda was just as safe and effective in older people as it was in younger people.

If you have questions about using Haegarda given your age, talk with your doctor.

Will Haegarda cure my condition?

No, Haegarda won’t cure hereditary angioedema (HAE). Instead, Haegarda helps prevent HAE attacks. (With HAE attacks, you have episodes of sudden, severe, and painful swelling.)

The drug does this by helping to keep steady levels of a protein called C1-INH in your body. For more information about how Haegarda works, see the “How Haegarda works” section above.

Haegarda will continue working to prevent HAE attacks as long as you keep using the drug.

Does Haegarda increase the risk of bloodborne infections?

Yes, Haegarda may increase your risk of bloodborne infections. (Bloodborne infections are infections that are transmitted through blood.)

This is because Haegarda is made from human blood. The blood that’s used to make Haegarda is tested for infections before it’s used to make the drug. But there’s still a risk that the blood used to make Haegarda may carry an infection.

The percentage of people who had a bloodborne infection after taking Haegarda wasn’t reported in clinical studies.

If you have questions about your risk of getting an infection from Haegarda, talk with your doctor.

Will Haegarda increase my risk of blood clots?

Yes, it’s possible to have a blood clot while you’re taking Haegarda. You have a higher risk of blood clots if you:

  • have certain medical conditions, such as a limited ability to move around or a history of stroke
  • take certain medications, such as birth control pills

If you have questions about your risk of blood clots while taking Haegarda, talk with your doctor.

Before taking Haegarda, talk with your doctor about your health history. Haegarda may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Increased risk of blood clots. It’s possible to have a blood clot while you’re taking Haegarda. You have a higher risk of blood clots if you have certain medical conditions, such as a limited ability to move around or a history of stroke. Your risk may also be increased if you take certain medications, such as birth control pills. Talk with your doctor about your risk of blood clots while you’re taking Haegarda.
  • Increased risk of infections. Haegarda is made from human blood. The blood that’s used to make Haegarda is tested for infections before it’s used in manufacturing. But there’s still a risk that the blood used to make Haegarda may carry an infection. Talk with your doctor about your risk of infections from Haegarda.
  • A hypersensitivity reaction (allergic reaction). If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Haegarda or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take it again. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you. If you’re unsure of your medication allergies, talk with your doctor.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Haegarda is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Haegarda and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Haegarda can pass into the breast milk during breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Haegarda and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Haegarda, see the “Haegarda side effects” section above.

Do not use more Haegarda than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, taking more than needed may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you use too much Haegarda

If you think you’ve used too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Haegarda from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the drug vial. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether or not you can still use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store it.

Haegarda vials can be stored at temperatures up to 86°F (30°C). Haegarda should be stored in its original container away from light until ready to use. Do not freeze the vials.

Once you’ve mixed Haegarda powder with sterilized water, the solution can be stored at room temperature for up to 8 hours. After 8 hours, it must be discarded if it’s unused.

Disposal

Right after you’ve used a syringe or needle, dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needle. You can buy a sharps container online or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Haegarda is indicated for the prevention of hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

Administration

Haegarda is self-administered by subcutaneous injection.

Mechanism of action

Haegarda contains plasma-derived C1 esterase inhibitor (C1-INH). This protein is activated during the body’s inflammatory process.

People with HAE have low levels of functional C1-INH, leading to spontaneous attacks of angioedema. The C1-INH contained in Haegarda replaces dysfunctional endogenous C1-INH in people with HAE, preventing HAE attacks by maintaining steady levels of C1-INH in the body.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Haegarda has a half-life of 69 hours, and it reaches peak concentrations after 59 hours with twice weekly dosing.

Contraindications

Haegarda is contraindicated in people who’ve had a hypersensitivity reaction to C1-INH products or their ingredients.

Storage

Haegarda vials can be stored at temperatures up to 86°F (30°C). Haegarda should be stored in its original container away from light until ready to use. The vials should not be frozen.

The reconstituted solution can be stored at room temperature for up to 8 hours.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.