Lonhala Magnair is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s approved to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults. With COPD, you have swelling in your airways that makes it hard to breathe. COPD is a group of lung diseases that get worse over time. There isn’t a cure for COPD, but medications such as Lonhala Magnair can help you breathe easier and prevent your COPD from getting worse.

Lonhala Magnair contains the active drug glycopyrrolate. It belongs to a class of medications known as anticholinergics. (A class of medications is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.) More specifically, glycopyrrolate is a type of anticholinergic drug called a long-acting muscarinic antagonist (LAMA).

In people with COPD, anticholinergics help to keep their airways open. These drugs also reduce the amount of mucus and other secretions in people’s lungs. These actions help make it easier to breathe.

When you get a prescription for Lonhala Magnair, you’ll get vials that contain the medication Lonhala and you’ll get the Magnair nebulizer. (Magnair is a battery-powered, portable nebulizer, which allows it to be used outside of your home.)

Lonhala comes as a liquid solution inside single-use vials. It’s available in one strength: 25 mcg/mL. You’ll take Lonhala using the Magnair nebulizer. With a nebulizer, the liquid medication is turned into a mist that you can inhale.

Effectiveness

During clinical studies, Lonhala Magnair was found effective in treating COPD. In the studies, people’s FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) was recorded. FEV1 measures how much air a person can forcefully breathe out over 1 second of time. This volume shows how well people’s lungs are working. Higher FEV1s indicate better lung function than lower FEV1s indicate.

In one clinical study, people with COPD took either Lonhala Magnair or a placebo (treatment with no active drug). For people in both treatment groups, FEV1 was measured 24 hours after they had taken their treatment. After 28 days of treatment, FEV1 was increased by an average of 0.128 L more in people taking Lonhala Magnair than it was increased in people taking the placebo.

For more information on the effectiveness of Lonhala Magnair, see the “Lonhala Magnair uses” section below.

Lonhala Magnair is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be just as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics also tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Lonhala Magnair can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Lonhala Magnair. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Lonhala Magnair, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs they have approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Lonhala Magnair, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

The mild side effects of Lonhala Magnair that are more common* can include:

The mild side effects of Lonhala Magnair that are less common** can include:

  • wheezing
  • fatigue (lack of energy)
  • common cold and other acute respiratory infections
  • fluid retention and swelling

* Occurred in more than 2% of people in clinical studies

** Occurred in less than 2% of people in clinical studies

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Lonhala Magnair aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Paradoxical bronchospasm (a sudden tightening of your airways that’s unexpected since the drug is meant to relax your airways). Symptoms can include:
    • shortness of breath
    • trouble breathing
    • coughing
  • Narrow-angle glaucoma (increased pressure in your eye). Symptoms can include:
    • eye pain
    • blurry vision or seeing halos
    • redness in your eye
    • nausea
    • vomiting
  • Urinary retention. Symptoms can include:
    • having trouble emptying your bladder
    • urinating in drops or having a weakened stream of urine
    • pelvic pain or pressure
  • Severe allergic reaction, which is explained in more detail below in “Side effect details.”

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on a few of the side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have a hypersensitivity reaction, including allergic reaction, after taking Lonhala Magnair. But it’s not known for sure how many people using Lonhala Magnair have had an allergic reaction to the drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing or speaking
  • hives or skin rash

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Lonhala Magnair. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Shortness of breath

You may have shortness of breath while you’re taking Lonhala Magnair. In clinical studies, 4.9% of people who took Lonhala Magnair had this side effect. In comparison, shortness of breath occurred in 3% of people who took a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

But keep in mind that shortness of breath is also a symptom of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Because of this, it can be hard to tell if your shortness of breath is caused by a medication or COPD.

If you have mild shortness of breath while you’re taking Lonhala Magnair, talk with your doctor. They’ll check to see if your COPD is getting worse. And they’ll recommend whether you need to switch to a different COPD medication.

But if you have severe shortness of breath while you’re taking Lonhala Magnair, call your doctor right away. If you feel that your symptoms are life threatening, call 911.

Urinary tract infection

It’s possible to have urinary tract infections (UTIs) as a side effect of Lonhala Magnair. In clinical studies, 2.1% of people who took Lonhala Magnair had a UTI. In comparison, UTIs occurred in 1.4% of people taking a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

Symptoms of UTI can include:

  • burning or pain with urination
  • pain in your pelvic area or back
  • blood in your urine

If you have symptoms of a UTI while you’re taking Lonhala Magnair, call your doctor. They can check to see if you have a UTI. If you do, they’ll prescribe a medication to treat the infection. And if you have a UTI, there’s no need to stop taking Lonhala Magnair, unless your doctor recommends that you do.

The typical dosage of Lonhala Magnair to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is described below. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Lonhala Magnair is made up of two parts: vials that contain the medication Lonhala and a Magnair nebulizer. (Magnair is a battery-powered, portable nebulizer, which allows it to be used outside of your home.)

Lonhala contains the active drug glycopyrrolate. It comes as a liquid solution inside single-use vials. It’s available in one strength: 25 mcg/mL.

You’ll take Lonhala using the Magnair nebulizer. With a nebulizer, the liquid medication is turned into a mist that you can inhale.

The Magnair nebulizer is made specifically to be used with Lonhala vials. You shouldn’t use any medications other than Lonhala with the Magnair nebulizer. As well, Lonhala vials should not be used with any nebulizer other than the Magnair nebulizer.

Note: Lonhala liquid solution should only be taken through inhalation using the Magnair nebulizer. You shouldn’t swallow or inject the liquid into your body.

Dosage for COPD

The typical dosage of Lonhala Magnair for COPD is one vial (which contains 25 mcg of glycopyrrolate), taken by nebulization twice each day. Your doses of Lonhala Magnair should be taken about every 12 hours.

Note: You shouldn’t use Lonhala Magnair to treat sudden breathing problems. Instead, Lonhala Magnair is meant to be used consistently twice each day to control COPD symptoms over time. If you have sudden breathing problems, you should use a rescue inhaler, as directed by your doctor, to quickly treat your symptoms.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Lonhala Magnair, just skip the missed dose. Then take your next dose at the usual time. Don’t double-up on doses by taking more than one dose at a time. Doubling-up on doses can increase your risk of serious side effects from the drug.

To learn more about side effects of Lonhala Magnair, see the “Lonhala Magnair side effects” section above.

And to help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Lonhala Magnair is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Lonhala Magnair is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Other drugs are available that can treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Lonhala Magnair, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed below are used off-label to treat COPD. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Examples of drugs that may be used to treat COPD include:

  • short-acting muscarinic antagonists (SAMAs), such as:
    • ipratropium (Atrovent HFA)
  • combination medications that contain both a SABA and a SAMA, such as:
  • long-acting beta2-agonists (LABAs), such as:
    • indacaterol (Arcapta)
    • olodaterol (Striverdi Respimat)
    • salmeterol (Serevent)
  • long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs), such as:
    • aclidinium (Tudorza)
    • glycopyrrolate (Seebri Neohaler)
    • tiotropium (Spiriva)
    • umeclidinium (Incruse Ellipta)
  • combination medications that contain both a LAMA and a LABA, such as:
    • glycopyrrolate/indacaterol (Utibron Neohaler)
  • combination medications that contain both an inhaled corticosteroid and a LABA, such as:
    • budesonide/formoterol (Symbicort)
    • fluticasone/salmeterol (Advair)
    • mometasone/formoterol (Dulera)
  • combination medications that contain an inhaled corticosteroid, a LABA, and a LAMA, such as:
    • fluticasone/vilanterol/umeclidinium (Trelegy Ellipta)
  • theophylline
  • roflumilast (Daliresp)

You may wonder how Lonhala Magnair compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva are alike and different.

Ingredients

Lonhala Magnair contains the drug glycopyrrolate, while Spiriva contains the drug tiotropium.

Glycopyrrolate and tiotropium both belong to a class of medications called anticholinergics. These drugs help to make breathing easier by keeping your airways open and reducing the amount of mucus in your lungs. More specifically, both glycopyrrolate and tiotropium are types of anticholinergics called long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs).

Uses

Lonhala Magnair, Spiriva HandiHaler, and Spiriva Respimat are all approved to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults.

In addition, Spiriva Respimat is approved to treat asthma in adults and children ages 6 years and older.

Note: Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva aren’t meant to be used as rescue inhalers to treat sudden breathing problems. Instead, these drugs should be used consistently each day to control COPD symptoms over time. For sudden breathing problems, you’ll need to use your rescue inhaler as directed by your doctor.

Drug forms and administration

Lonhala Magnair is made up of two parts: vials that contain the medication Lonhala and a Magnair nebulizer. (Magnair is a battery-powered, portable nebulizer, which allows it to be used outside of your home.)

Lonhala comes as a liquid solution inside single-use vials. You’ll take Lonhala twice each day using the Magnair nebulizer. With a nebulizer, the liquid medication is turned into a mist that you can inhale.

Spiriva is available in these two forms, which are each taken as two inhalations (puffs) once each day:

  • Spiriva HandiHaler, which comes as a dry powder inhaler
  • Spiriva Respimat, which comes as an inhalation spray

Side effects and risks

While Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva contain different drugs, they work in similar ways in your body. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Lonhala Magnair, with either form of Spiriva, or with any of these drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Lonhala Magnair:
    • shortness of breath
    • fatigue (lack of energy)
    • wheezing
  • Can occur with Spiriva:
    • dry mouth
    • upset stomach
    • constipation
    • cough
    • nosebleed
    • sinusitis (inflammation in your sinuses)
  • Can occur with both Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva:

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with Lonhala Magnair or each form of Spiriva (when taken individually).

  • paradoxical bronchospasm (a sudden tightening of your airways that’s unexpected since the drug is meant to relax your airways)
  • hypersensitivity reaction, including severe allergic reaction
  • acute narrow-angle glaucoma (increased pressure in your eye)
  • urinary retention

Effectiveness

Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

In several clinical studies, the active drugs contained in Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva have been directly compared in treating COPD.

One study looked at treating COPD with either glycopyrrolate (the active drug in Lonhala Magnair), tiotropium (the active drug in Spiriva), or a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

In the study, people’s FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) was recorded. FEV1 measures how much air a person can forcefully breathe out over 1 second of time. This volume shows how well people’s lungs are working. Higher FEV1s indicate better lung function than lower FEV1s indicate.

In this 26-week study, people’s FEV1 was measured 24 hours after they had taken their treatment. For people taking glycopyrrolate, their FEV1 was increased by 0.12 L (liters) more than the FEV1 in people taking the placebo. And for people taking tiotropium, their FEV1 was increased by 0.13 L more than the FEV1 in people taking the placebo.

Costs

Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Lonhala Magnair and Spiriva generally cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

You may wonder how Lonhala Magnair compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta are alike and different.

Ingredients

Lonhala Magnair contains the drug glycopyrrolate, while Incruse Ellipta contains the drug umeclidinium.

Glycopyrrolate and umeclidinium both belong to a class of medications called anticholinergics. These drugs help to make breathing easier by keeping your airways open and reducing the amount of mucus in your lungs. More specifically, both glycopyrrolate and umeclidinium are types of anticholinergics called long-acting muscarinic antagonists (LAMAs).

Uses

Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta are both approved to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults.

Note: Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta aren’t meant to be used as rescue inhalers to treat sudden breathing problems. Instead, these drugs should be used consistently each day to control COPD symptoms over time. For sudden breathing problems, you’ll need to use a rescue inhaler, as directed by your doctor.

Drug forms and administration

Lonhala Magnair is made up of two parts: vials that contain the medication Lonhala and a Magnair nebulizer. (Magnair is a battery-powered, portable nebulizer, which allows it to be used outside of your home.)

Lonhala comes as a liquid solution inside single-use vials. You’ll take Lonhala twice each day using the Magnair nebulizer. With a nebulizer, the liquid medication is turned into a mist that you can inhale.

Incruse Ellipta comes as a dry powder inside an inhaler. (“Ellipta” refers to the inhaler that’s used with Incruse.) Incruse Ellipta is taken as one inhalation (puff) once each day.

Side effects and risks

While Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta contain different drugs, they work in similar ways. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Lonhala Magnair, with Incruse Ellipta, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Lonhala Magnair:
    • shortness of breath
    • fatigue (lack of energy)
    • wheezing
    • fluid retention and swelling
  • Can occur with Incruse Ellipta:
    • cough
    • muscle ache
    • supset stomach
  • Can occur with both Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta:
    • common cold and other acute respiratory infections

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Lonhala Magnair, with Incruse Ellipta, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Lonhala Magnair:
    • acute narrow-angle glaucoma (increased pressure in your eye)
    • urinary retention
  • Can occur with Incruse Ellipta:
  • Can occur with both Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta:
    • paradoxical bronchospasm (sudden tightening of your airways that’s unexpected because the drug is meant to relax your airways)
    • hypersensitivity reaction, including severe allergic reaction

Effectiveness

The only condition both Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta are used to treat is chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD).

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. But separate studies have found both Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta to be effective in treating COPD.

An indirect comparison looked at several different clinical studies that involved treating COPD with either glycopyrrolate (the active drug in Lonhala Magnair) or umeclidinium (the active drug in Incruse Ellipta).

In these studies, people’s FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) was recorded. FEV1 measures how much air a person can forcefully breathe out over 1 second of time. This volume shows how well people’s lungs are working. Higher FEV1s indicate better lung function than lower FEV1s indicate.

The comparison found that FEV1 was increased more in people who took either glycopyrrolate or umeclidinium than it was in people who took a placebo (treatment with no active drug). And the comparison showed that FEV1 was increased more in people taking glycopyrrolate than in people taking umeclidinium.

Costs

Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Lonhala Magnair and Incruse Ellipta generally cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Lonhala Magnair to treat certain conditions. However, Lonhala Magnair is sometimes also used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Lonhala Magnair for COPD

Lonhala Magnair is FDA-approved to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults.

COPD is a condition that causes long-term blockage of airflow through your lungs. It’s a progressive disease, which means it gets worse over time. There isn’t a cure for COPD, but medications such as Lonhala Magnair can help reduce your COPD symptoms and prevent the condition from getting worse.

With COPD, the cells inside your airways become damaged from inflammation and scarring. This causes your airways to narrow. Along with inflammation, you may have mucus buildup in your airways. This makes it even harder for air to flow through them. Symptoms of COPD include shortness of breath and cough.

COPD symptoms often make it hard for people to do certain physical activities. But sometimes, people with COPD can feel out of breath even when they’re at rest.

Lonhala Magnair is a bronchodilator, which means it works to keep the airways in your lungs open (dilated). The drug also helps to reduce the amount of mucus in your lungs. These actions help to open and clear up your airways, which allows you to breathe easier.

Note: Lonhala Magnair isn’t meant to be used as a rescue inhaler to treat sudden breathing problems. Instead, it should be used consistently each day to control COPD symptoms over time. For sudden breathing problems, you’ll need to use a rescue inhaler, as directed by your doctor.

Effectiveness for COPD

During clinical studies, Lonhala Magnair was found effective in treating COPD. In the studies, people’s FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 second) was recorded. FEV1 measures how much air a person can forcefully breathe out over 1 second of time. This volume shows how well people’s lungs are working. Higher FEV1s indicate better lung function than lower FEV1s indicate.

In one clinical study, people with COPD took either Lonhala Magnair or a placebo (treatment with no active drug). For people in both treatment groups, FEV1 was measured 24 hours after they had taken their treatment. After 28 days of treatment, FEV1 was increased by an average of 0.128 L more in people taking Lonhala Magnair than it was in people taking the placebo.

Another study also looked at COPD treatment with Lonhala Magnair versus a placebo. This study looked at people who had COPD and were at least 40 years of age. The people also had a history of cigarette smoking of at least 10 pack-years. (A pack-year is a way to describe the number of cigarettes a person has smoked over a period of time.)

The researchers in this study had people complete a COPD survey called St. George’s Respiratory Questionnaire (SGRQ). This survey rates how much of an impact COPD has on people’s daily life and overall health. Higher SGRQ scores show that a person is more limited by their COPD than lower scores show.

In the study, all the people took the SGRQ survey before they used any COPD treatment. Then, some of the people used Lonhala Magnair, while others used a placebo. After 84 days of treatment, all of the people took the SGRQ survey a second time. Of people who used Lonhala Magnair, 51% had a significant decrease in their SGRQ score. (This showed that their COPD symptoms had also significantly improved.) Of people taking the placebo, 40% had the same result.

Lonhala Magnair is meant to be used as a long-term treatment for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). You should take this medication every day for as long as your doctor prescribes. In fact, you should use Lonhala Magnair each day, even if you’re not having any COPD symptoms.

Depending on how severe your COPD symptoms are, your doctor may recommend that you take other medications with Lonhala Magnair. This can include other drugs that are also used consistently each day.

Your doctor may also recommend that you use a rescue inhaler to treat sudden breathing problems while you’re using Lonhala Magnair.

Using rescue inhalers with Lonhala Magnair

Keep in mind that you shouldn’t use Lonhala Magnair treat sudden breathing problems. Instead, you should use a rescue inhaler to treat sudden breathing problems, such as shortness of breath. Unlike Lonhala Magnair, which works over time to control COPD symptoms, rescue inhalers work quickly to improve breathing symptoms right away.

Examples of rescue inhalers include:

During your Lonhala Magnair treatment, you should continue to use your rescue inhaler, as directed by your doctor.

There aren’t any known interactions between Lonhala Magnair and alcohol.

But there are studies that show that using alcohol over a long period of time can damage cilia in your airways. (Cilia are tiny hair-like structures in your lungs that work to clean the air that you inhale.) If your cilia are damaged, your airways will have a harder time staying clean inside. This not only makes it harder for you to breathe, but also increases your risk of infection.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink while you’re using Lonhala Magnair.

Lonhala Magnair can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Lonhala Magnair and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Lonhala Magnair. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Lonhala Magnair.

Before taking Lonhala Magnair, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Lonhala Magnair and other anticholinergic medications

Lonhala Magnair contains the active drug glycopyrrolate. This drug belongs to a class of medications called anticholinergics. (A class of medications is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.)

Anticholinergic medications are used to treat many different conditions. If you use other anticholinergics along with Lonhala Magnair, the medications may interact with each other. And you may have an increased risk of certain side effects, such as urinary retention.

Commonly used anticholinergic medications that may interact with Lonhala Magnair include:

If you need to take any of the medications listed above while you’re using Lonhala Magnair, your doctor will closely monitor you for any side effects.

Keep in mind that there are many other anticholinergic medications that aren’t listed above. Make sure to tell you doctor about all of the medications you’re taking before starting Lonhala Magnair.

Lonhala Magnair and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Lonhala Magnair. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Lonhala Magnair.

As with all medications, the cost of Lonhala Magnair can vary. To find current prices for Lonhala Magnair in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before approving coverage for Lonhala Magnair. This means that your doctor will need to send a request to your insurance company asking them to cover the drug. The insurance company will review the request and let you and your doctor know if your plan will cover Lonhala Magnair.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Lonhala Magnair, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Lonhala Magnair, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., the manufacturer of Lonhala Magnair, offers a savings card that can help lower the cost of your prescription. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, visit the program website.

You should take Lonhala Magnair according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Lonhala Magnair is made up of two parts: vials that contain the medication Lonhala and a Magnair nebulizer. (Magnair is a battery-powered, portable nebulizer, which allows it to be used outside of your home.)

Lonhala comes as a liquid solution inside single-use vials. You’ll take Lonhala twice each day using the Magnair nebulizer. With a nebulizer, the liquid medication is turned into a mist that you can inhale through the machine’s mouth piece.

For both video and written instructions on how to use the Lonhala Magnair nebulizer system, visit the manufacturer’s website.

When to take

You’ll take Lonhala Magnair twice each day. You should take the medication at the same time each day, keeping your doses about 12 hours apart.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Lonhala Magnair is approved to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults.

What is COPD?

COPD is a condition that causes long-term blockage of airflow through your lungs. It’s a progressive disease, which means it gets worse over time. There isn’t a cure for COPD, but medications such as Lonhala Magnair can help reduce your COPD symptoms and prevent the condition from getting worse.

With COPD, the cells inside your airways become damaged from inflammation and scarring. This causes your airways to narrow. Along with inflammation, you may have mucus buildup in your airways. This makes it even harder for air to flow through your airways.

What does Lonhala Magnair do?

Lonhala Magnair contains the drug glycopyrrolate. This drug belongs to a class of medications called anticholinergics. (A class of medications is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.)

In people with COPD, anticholinergics help to keep the airways in their lungs open. These drugs also work to reduce the amount of mucus in their lungs. These actions help to make it easier for you to breathe.

How long does it take to work?

Lonhala Magnair begins to work within several minutes after you take your dose. Most people begin to breathe easier about 20 minutes after taking a dose of the drug.

However, it’s possible that you won’t notice any improvement in your COPD symptoms right away. This is because Lonhala Magnair works over time to help keep your airways relaxed and opened.

It’s not known for sure if Lonhala Magnair is safe to use during pregnancy. No clinical studies of this drug have been done in pregnant women or in pregnant animals.

However, glycopyrrolate (the active drug in Lonhala Magnair) has been studied in pregnant animals. In these studies, no birth defects were seen in fetuses born to females who were given the drug during pregnancy. But keep in mind that animal studies don’t always predict how the drug will affect humans.

If you have COPD and you’re pregnant or may become pregnant, talk with your doctor. They can discuss with you the risks and benefits of using Lonhala Magnair during pregnancy.

It’s not known if Lonhala Magnair is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Lonhala Magnair.

It’s not know whether or not Lonhala Magnair is safe to use while breastfeeding. This is because researchers aren’t sure if glycopyrrolate (the active drug in Lonhala Magnair) is passed into human breast milk.

In animal studies, glycopyrrolate has passed into the milk of lactating rats. However, animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in people.

If you’re taking Lonhala Magnair and you’re considering breastfeeding, talk with your doctor. They can discuss the benefits and risks of using Lonhala Magnair while breastfeeding. And they’ll recommend safe and healthy ways to feed your child.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Lonhala Magnair.

Should I use Lonhala Magnair for sudden breathing problems?

No, you shouldn’t use Lonhala Magnair to treat sudden breathing problems. Lonhala Magnair is meant to be used consistently over time to control symptoms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). This drug doesn’t work quickly enough to treat sudden breathing problems right away.

Instead, your doctor will likely recommend that you use a rescue inhaler, such as albuterol, for sudden breathing problems.

If you have questions about using rescue inhalers to treat sudden breathing problems while you’re using Lonhala Magnair, talk with your doctor.

Will I taste Lonhala Magnair during my nebulizer treatments?

No, you probably won’t taste Lonhala Magnair during your nebulizer treatment. With a nebulizer, the liquid medication is turned into a mist that you’ll inhale.

Lonhala Magnair contains glycopyrrolate. Once nebulized, this medication is a clear, flavorless mist.

Can I mix other drugs with Lonhala Magnair when I put it in my nebulizer?

No, you shouldn’t mix Lonhala Magnair with other medications in your nebulizer.

The Magnair nebulizer is made only to hold and nebulize vials of Lonhala. Putting other medications into your Magnair nebulizer could cause your machine to stop working properly.

If you’d like to use combination medications to help reduce the number of drugs you need to take, talk with your doctor about your treatment options.

Can I use Lonhala Magnair if I have problems with my prostate?

Maybe, but it depends. In people with benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH), Lonhala Magnair can cause new or worsening urinary retention. (With BPH, your prostate is enlarged.) Having urinary retention means that it may hard for you to empty your bladder.

Lonhala Magnair should be used cautiously in people with prostate problems, including BPH. If you have BPH or other problems with your prostate, talk with your doctor before starting this drug. They can help you decide whether it’s safe for you to use Lonhala Magnair.

Before taking Lonhala Magnair, talk with your doctor about your health history. Lonhala Magnair may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Narrow-angle glaucoma. Glycopyrrolate, the active drug in Lonhala Magnair, can cause acute narrow-angle glaucoma (a sudden buildup of pressure in your eye). This condition can lead to sudden loss of vision, especially in people who have glaucoma before starting Lonhala Magnair. Symptoms of narrow-angle glaucoma include nausea, vomiting, or severe aching around your eye. If you have any of these symptoms, call your doctor right away. If you have narrow-angle glaucoma, talk with your doctor before starting Lonhala Magnair. They may recommend a different COPD medication for you.
  • Urinary retention. Glycopyrrolate, the active drug in Lonhala Magnair, can cause or worsen urinary retention in people who already have the condition. People with prostate problems, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) or a bladder-neck obstruction (a condition that partly or completely blocks the flow of urine from your bladder) have an increased risk of urinary retention. If you have urinary retention, or any problems with your bladder or prostate, talk with your doctor before starting Lonhala Magnair.
  • Allergic reaction. You shouldn’t use Lonhala Magnair if you’ve had an allergic reaction to Lonhala or any of its ingredients in the past. Talk with your doctor if you’re unsure whether you’ve had an allergic reaction to any drugs in the past.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Lonhala Magnair is safe for use during pregnancy. For more information, please see the “Lonhala Magnair and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It isn’t known if Lonhala Magnair may be safely used while breastfeeding. For more information, please see the “Lonhala Magnair and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Lonhala Magnair, see the “Lonhala Magnair side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Lonhala Magnair can lead to serious side effects.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

  • nausea
  • vomiting
  • dizziness
  • feeling lightheaded
  • blurry vision
  • pain or redness in your eyes
  • trouble urinating
  • constipation

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Lonhala Magnair from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Lonhala Magnair vials should be stored at room temperature, between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C). The vials should be kept in their original, unopened foil pouches. The medication should be kept away from light. Also avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as in bathrooms.

Once you’ve opened a foil pouch, the vials inside can be used for up to 7 days. Opened Lonhala vials should be used right away. If they’re not used right away, they should be disposed of.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Lonhala Magnair and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

The FDA website provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Lonhala Magnair is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the maintenance treatment of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults.

Mechanism of action

Lonhala Magnair contains one active ingredient: glycopyrrolate.

Glycopyrrolate is a long-acting anticholinergic and muscarinic antagonist. It inhibits the activity of acetylcholine on smooth muscles, resulting in bronchodilation and a reduction in excessive bronchial, pharyngeal, and tracheal secretions.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Following inhalation via the Magnair nebulizer, glycopyrrolate is rapidly absorbed and reaches peak plasma levels in under 20 minutes. Systemic bioavailability of orally inhaled glycopyrrolate is approximately 40%. Steady-state plasma levels are reached within 1 week of consistent use.

Glycopyrrolate is not highly protein bound. The plasma protein binding of this drug is estimated to be between 38% and 41%. Glycopyrrolate is metabolized by the liver via hydrolysis and oxidation.

Glycopyrrolate is primarily eliminated by the kidneys, with 60% to 70% of the total clearance occurring via renal elimination. The majority of nonrenal clearance is thought to be due to hepatic metabolism, although biliary clearance does contribute.

Contraindications

Lonhala Magnair is contraindicated in people with a hypersensitivity to glycopyrrolate or any of its other ingredients.

Storage

Lonhala Magnair vials should be stored at controlled room temperature, between 68°F and 77°F (20°C and 25°C). The vials should be kept in their original, unopened foil pouches. Once a foil pouch is opened, the vials can only be used for up to 7 days. Opened Lonhala vials should be used immediately. Otherwise they should be discarded.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.