Nexlizet is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA approved for use in certain adults to help reduce:

Drug details

Nexlizet contains two active drugs: bempedoic acid and ezetimibe.

Bempedoic acid belongs to a group of drugs called adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase inhibitors. Bempedoic acid is specifically approved to lower the risk of heart attack and coronary revascularization.

Ezetimibe belongs to a group of drugs called cholesterol absorption inhibitors. Ezetimibe specifically works to lower cholesterol.

Nexlizet works in two different ways:

  • by decreasing the amount of cholesterol your liver makes
  • by preventing your small intestine from absorbing cholesterol

For more information, see the “How Nexlizet works” section below.

Nexlizet comes as a tablet that you swallow. You’ll likely take it once per day. It’s available in one strength: 180 milligrams (mg) of bempedoic acid/10 mg of ezetimibe.

FDA approval

In 2020, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Nexlizet to help reduce LDL cholesterol in adults. Nexlizet became the first combination drug approved for this use that doesn’t contain a statin. (A combination drug is a drug that contains more than one active ingredient.)

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Nexlizet, see the “Nexlizet uses” section below.

Nexlizet can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Nexlizet. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Nexlizet, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you’d like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Nexlizet, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Below is a partial list of mild side effects from Nexlizet. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or visit Nexlizet’s prescribing information.

Mild side effects of Nexlizet can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* For more information on this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Nexlizet aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, which are explained below in “Side effect details,” include:

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Nexlizet. But it isn’t known how often this side effect may have occurred in clinical studies of Nexlizet.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Nexlizet, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Muscle spasm

Some people may experience muscle spasms while taking Nexlizet. This was a common side effect in clinical trials of the drug.

Some people in these clinical studies stopped taking their treatment because of bothersome muscle spasms. However, for reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, Nexlizet is typically prescribed with a statin drug. Statins may also contribute to this side effect.

If you’re concerned about bothersome muscle spasms while using Nexlizet, talk with your doctor. They can recommend treatments that may help reduce your muscle spasms. Or they may recommend a treatment option other than Nexlizet.

Hyperuricemia

Nexlizet may cause hyperuricemia (high blood levels of uric acid). And high levels of uric acid can lead to gout (sudden, painful swelling in the joints). This was a common side effect in Nexlizet’s clinical trials.

Hyperuricemia is most likely to occur within the first 4 weeks of starting treatment with the drug. People with a history of gout may be at a higher risk of having gout while taking Nexlizet.

You’ll likely have your levels of uric acid monitored while you’re taking Nexlizet. If you have any sudden pain, swelling, redness, or skin discoloration in your joints while taking the drug, be sure to tell your doctor. They may prescribe medications to lower your levels of uric acid if you have hyperuricemia.

Tendon ruptures

A tendon rupture (a torn tendon) can happen while taking Nexlizet. (Tendons are tissues that connect muscles to bones.) This side effect was rare in clinical trials.

The Achilles, bicep, and shoulder tendons were most commonly affected in these studies. But this side effect could affect any tendon in the body.

Depending on certain factors, you may have a higher risk for a tendon rupture while taking Nexlizet. These factors include:

Symptoms of a tendon rupture include joint pain, swelling, or bruising. You may also hear a popping sound or feel your tendon snap.

Tell your doctor right away if you have any of these symptoms while taking Nexlizet. They may have you stop taking the drug until they can find out if you’ve had a tendon rupture. If you have a tendon rupture while taking Nexlizet, your doctor will likely change your treatment.

As with all medications, the cost of Nexlizet can vary. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Nexlizet. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Nexlizet, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Nexlizet, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Nexlizet, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Esperion Therapeutics, Inc., the manufacturer of Nexlizet, offers a Co-Pay Card that may help lower the amount you pay for the drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible, call 855-699-8814 or visit the manufacturer’s website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Nexlizet may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Nexlizet. This means there should be less of a concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Nexlizet isn’t available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

To save money on your Nexlizet prescription, explore the coupon options below. Note: Optum Perks coupons cannot be used with insurance copays or benefits.

Save on your Nexlizet prescription

Use your insurance to pay as little as $- through Nexlizet:’s manufacturer savings card.

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Your doctor will likely start you on the typical dosage approved to help treat your condition. Then, they’ll monitor whether the drug is working for you and whether you experience any side effects. Your doctor may stop your Nexlizet treatment if it isn’t safe or effective for you.

The Nexlizet dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Nexlizet to treat
  • your age
  • other medical conditions you may have

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Nexlizet comes as a tablet that you swallow. It’s available in one strength: 180 milligrams (mg) of bempedoic acid per 10 mg of ezetimibe.

Dosage for reducing LDL cholesterol

Nexlizet is approved to help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in certain adults.

The recommended dosage for this purpose is one tablet once per day. The drug can be taken with or without food.

Dosage for reducing certain cardiovascular risks

Nexlizet is approved to help reduce the risk of heart attack and coronary revascularization (a type of heart procedure) in certain adults.

The recommended dosage for this purpose is one tablet once per day. The drug can be taken with or without food.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Nexlizet, take it as soon as you remember. But if it’s almost time for your next dose, skip your missed dose and take the next dose on your regular schedule. Don’t take extra doses to make up for your missed dose. This can increase your risk for side effects from Nexlizet.*

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can also work.

* For more information about the possible side effects of Nexlizet, see the “Nexlizet side effects” section above.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Nexlizet is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Nexlizet is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Nexlizet is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Nexlizet contains the active drugs bempedoic acid and ezetimibe.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Nexlizet to treat certain conditions. Nexlizet may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Nexlizet for reducing LDL cholesterol

Nexlizet is FDA approved to help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in adults. (LDL cholesterol is also known as “bad” cholesterol.) This drug is typically prescribed along with diet and exercise. Doctors may prescribe Nexlizet with or without a statin drug. It’s approved for this use in adults with primary hyperlipidemia, including heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH).

Nexlizet contains two active drugs: bempedoic acid and ezetimibe. Ezetimibe belongs to a group of drugs called cholesterol absorption inhibitors. This drug specifically works to lower cholesterol. Bempedoic acid is approved for the drug’s other use, which is described below.

Nexlizet for reducing cardiovascular risks

Nexlizet is also FDA approved to help reduce the risk of heart attack and coronary revascularization (a type of heart procedure). This drug is prescribed to help decrease these risks when statins cannot be used. Nexlizet is approved for this purpose in adults with cardiovascular disease (CVD) or an increased risk of developing CVD.

Nexlizet contains two active drugs: bempedoic acid and ezetimibe. Bempedoic acid belongs to a group of drugs called adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase inhibitors. This drug is specifically approved to lower the risk of heart attack and coronary revascularization. Ezetimibe works for the purpose described above.

Nexlizet and children

Nexlizet isn’t approved for use in children. It’s not known if the drug is safe or effective for children.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Nexlizet, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat your condition include:

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA approved drug is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

You may wonder how Nexlizet compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here, we look at how Nexlizet and Nexletol are alike and different.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved both Nexlizet and Nexletol to help reduce:

Both Nexlizet and Nexletol contain bempedoic acid (in the same strength) as an active drug. But Nexlizet also contains another active drug, ezetimibe.

Taking ezetimibe and bempedoic acid together can help reduce LDL cholesterol even more than taking bempedoic acid by itself. For this reason, your doctor may recommend that you take both bempedoic acid and ezetimibe. If they do, they may prescribe Nexlizet so that you can take bempedoic acid and ezetimibe together in a single pill.

Both Nexlizet and Nexletol are typically taken once per day, with or without with food.

If you have questions about how Nexlizet and Nexletol are alike and different, talk with your doctor.

Nexlizet can interact with several other medications.* It may also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

* These interactions were seen in separate studies of Nexlizet’s two active ingredients, bempedoic acid and ezetimibe. Clinical studies of possible drug interactions with Nexlizet haven’t been done.

Nexlizet and other medications

Below are examples of medications that can interact with Nexlizet. This section does not contain all drugs that may interact with Nexlizet.

Before taking Nexlizet, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Nexlizet and certain statin drugs

Nexlizet may be taken with or without a statin drug to help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Statins are a group of drugs used to treat high cholesterol.

But Nexlizet may interact with two specific statins: simvastatin (Zocor) and pravastatin (Pravachol). Nexlizet can raise the levels of these statins in your blood. Simvastatin and pravastatin can cause muscle pain and muscle weakness. So, your risk for these muscle side effects may increase if you take Nexlizet with either of these statins.

If you take Nexlizet with one of these statins, your doctor will likely decrease your statin dose.

Before starting Nexlizet, if you’re taking a statin, be sure to tell your doctor which one you take.

Nexlizet and cyclosporine

Taking Nexlizet with cyclosporine (a drug that reduces the strength of your immune system) can raise the levels of both cyclosporine and ezetimibe in your body. (Ezetimibe is one of the active drugs in Nexlizet.) This can increase your risk for side effects from either medication.

If you’re taking cyclosporine, talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe for you to take Nexlizet. To learn about the possible side effects of Nexlizet, see the “Nexlizet side effects” section above.

Nexlizet and the fibrate drug class

Nexlizet shouldn’t be taken with certain drugs in the fibrate drug class. (A drug class is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.) Fibrate drugs are used to treat high cholesterol.

Both ezetimibe (one of the active drugs in Nexlizet) and fibrate drugs can increase the amount of cholesterol stored in your gallbladder. This can cause gallstones (hard lumps in your gallbladder). So, using Nexlizet with medications in the fibrate drug class can increase your risk for gallstones even more.

Symptoms of gallstones may include pain in the back, the shoulder, or the right side of the body (below the ribs).

It may be safe to use Nexlizet with fenofibrate (Fenoglide, Tricor, Triglide). But the use of Nexlizet with fibrates other than fenofibrate isn’t recommended.

If you have questions about using Nexlizet with fibrate drugs, talk with your doctor.

Nexlizet and bile acid sequestrant drugs

Nexlizet can interact with bile acid sequestrants, which are a group of drugs used to treat high cholesterol. Examples of bile acid sequestrants include cholestyramine (Prevalite) and colesevelam (Welchol).

Bile acid sequestrants can attach to ezetimibe, one of the active drugs in Nexlizet. This may prevent your body from absorbing Nexlizet, which could make it less effective in treating your condition.

If you take Nexlizet and a bile acid sequestrant, wait at least 2 hours before or 4 hours after taking the bile acid sequestrant to take Nexlizet.

Nexlizet and drugs that raise your risk for tendon ruptures

Taking Nexlizet with drugs that can cause a (a torn tendon) may raise your risk for this side effect even more. This is because tendon ruptures can also occur with Nexlizet. (For more information about this side effect, see “Tendon ruptures” in the “Nexlizet side effects” section above.)

Examples of drugs that can raise your risk for a tendon rupture if taken with Nexlizet include corticosteroids and fluoroquinolones (a type of antibiotic). Methylprednisolone (Medrol) is an example of a corticosteroid. And levofloxacin (Levaquin) is an example of a fluoroquinolone.

Be sure to tell your doctor if you’re taking either of these drugs before you start Nexlizet. If you’re prescribed these drugs after you’ve started Nexlizet, tell your doctor that as well. They may suggest other treatments for your conditions.

Nexlizet and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Nexlizet. But you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Nexlizet.

Nexlizet and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Nexlizet. But you’ll likely take Nexlizet with a statin drug. And if you do, you’ll need to avoid eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice.

It isn’t safe to consume grapefruit while using statins. Grapefruit can prevent statins from clearing out of your body. This can raise your statin levels and increase your risk for side effects. Examples of statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor) and rosuvastatin (Crestor).

See this article to learn more about how grapefruit may interact with medications. Talk with your doctor if you have questions about eating certain foods with Nexlizet.

Nexlizet is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s approved to help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, also known as “bad” cholesterol. This medication should be used along with a statin drug and a low cholesterol diet.

Statin drugs

Nexlizet is typically used with statin drugs to help reduce LDL cholesterol. Statins are another group of drugs used to treat high cholesterol.

But Nexlizet may interact with two specific statins: simvastatin (Zocor) and pravastatin (Pravachol). Before taking Nexlizet, let your doctor know if you take either of these statins. They’ll likely reduce your statin dose. (For more information about this interaction, see the “Nexlizet interactions” section above.)

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about taking a statin with Nexlizet.

Other cholesterol-lowering drugs

Some people may have troublesome side effects from statins that prevent them from being able to take these drugs. People bothered by statin side effects may use Nexlizet with other drugs that reduce LDL cholesterol instead of statins.

But there are limitations to using Nexlizet with certain cholesterol-lowering drugs. Examples of these drugs include fibrate drugs and bile acid sequestrants.* (For more information, see the “Nexlizet interactions” section above.)

If you have questions about using Nexlizet with other cholesterol-lowering drugs, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* If you take Nexlizet while also taking a bile acid sequestrant, Nexlizet should be taken at least 2 hours before or 4 hours after the bile acid sequestrant. Examples of bile acid sequestrants include cholestyramine (Prevalite) and colesevelam (Welchol).

Low cholesterol diet

Cholesterol is made in your body and can also be found in many foods, such as eggs, cheese, and meat. Consuming high amounts of cholesterol in your diet can lead to having high cholesterol in your body.

In addition to taking Nexlizet, your doctor will probably recommend that you follow a low cholesterol diet. Doing so can help lower your cholesterol levels, which can help decrease your risk for heart disease.

For more information on a low cholesterol diet to follow while you take Nexlizet, talk with your doctor.

There are no known interactions between Nexlizet and alcohol.

But drinking in excess can damage your liver. And taking Nexlizet can increase your risk for higher levels of liver enzymes. This can be a sign of liver damage. So, if you take Nexlizet and have a history of excessive alcohol use, you may have a higher risk for this side effect.

Drinking alcohol can also increase the risk of gout. And people with a history of gout may be at a higher risk of having gout while taking Nexlizet.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much, if any, is safe for you to drink while taking Nexlizet. If you have a history of liver problems or drinking in excess, be sure to tell your doctor before you start taking Nexlizet.

You should take Nexlizet according to your doctor’s or another healthcare professional’s instructions.

Nexlizet comes as a tablet that you swallow.

When to take

You’ll likely take Nexlizet once per day. You can take the drug at any time of day, but try to take it at the same time each day. This will help your body maintain stable levels of the drug.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can also work.

Taking Nexlizet with food

You can take Nexlizet with or without food.

Can Nexlizet be crushed, split, or chewed?

No, Nexlizet can’t be crushed, split, or chewed. You should swallow the tablets whole. Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have trouble swallowing Nexlizet tablets.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Nexlizet to help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and certain cardiovascular risks. It’s approved for use in adults with certain conditions. (For more information about how the drug is used, see the “Nexlizet uses” section above.)

What is Nexlizet used treat?

Cholesterol occurs naturally in your body. It’s a fatty substance that’s made in your liver. Cholesterol can also be found in foods such as eggs, cheese, and meat. It helps your body make vitamins, hormones, and other important substances.

But having more cholesterol than your body can use may lead to serious problems, such as heart disease. Certain genetic (inherited) conditions, such as heterozygous familial hypercholesterolemia (HeFH), can cause high cholesterol. Eating a lot of high cholesterol foods or not getting enough exercise can also raise cholesterol levels.

Nexlizet is specifically approved to help reduce LDL cholesterol. LDL cholesterol is sometimes called “bad” cholesterol. This is because it can build up in the arteries and lead to angina (chest pain) or a heart attack.

Nexlizet is also approved to help reduce the risk of heart attack and coronary revascularization (a type of heart procedure). High cholesterol is a factor that commonly contributes to the development of these risks.

What is Nexlizet’s mechanism of action? What does the drug do?

Nexlizet contains two active drugs: bempedoic acid and ezetimibe. Nexlizet’s mechanism of action (how it works) is to lower your cholesterol in two ways:

  • Bempedoic acid decreases the amount of cholesterol your liver makes. It does this by blocking an enzyme called adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase.
  • Ezetimibe prevents your small intestine from absorbing cholesterol. As a result, less cholesterol travels from your small intestine to your liver. This causes your liver to break down the cholesterol it already has stored. When this happens, your liver can clear more cholesterol from your blood.

How long does it take to work?

Nexlizet starts working right away to decrease your LDL cholesterol. But you likely won’t be able to feel Nexlizet decreasing your cholesterol. This is because high cholesterol doesn’t usually cause any symptoms.

Your doctor will order a blood test to check your cholesterol levels about 8 to 12 weeks after you start treatment. This will help determine if Nexlizet is working for you.

It isn’t known whether Nexlizet is safe to use during pregnancy. It hasn’t been studied in pregnancy. But based on the way Nexlizet works in your body, it may not be safe to take while pregnant.

Animal studies haven’t shown any harm to offspring if used during pregnancy. But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

Talk with your doctor before starting Nexlizet if you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy.

It’s not known if Nexlizet is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Nexlizet.

For more information about taking Nexlizet during pregnancy, see the “Nexlizet and pregnancy” section above.

Breastfeeding isn’t recommended while taking Nexlizet. It’s not known if the drug can pass into breast milk while breastfeeding. If it does pass into breast milk, the drug may cause serious side effects in a child who is breastfed.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about breastfeeding while taking Nexlizet.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Nexlizet.

Will Nexlizet cure my high cholesterol?

No, Nexlizet won’t cure high levels of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. (LDL cholesterol is also known as “bad” cholesterol.) There currently isn’t a cure for this.

But Nexlizet has been found effective in helping reduce LDL cholesterol. It’s used in combination with a low cholesterol diet and a statin drug. Nexlizet works by decreasing the amount of cholesterol made in your liver. It also helps prevent your small intestine from absorbing cholesterol.

Nexlizet should keep helping decrease your LDL cholesterol for as long as you take it. But once you stop taking the drug, your LDL cholesterol may increase again.

If you have questions about how Nexlizet works to decrease your LDL cholesterol, talk with your doctor.

Is Nexlizet a statin?

No, Nexlizet isn’t a statin. Nexlizet contains two active drugs: bempedoic acid and ezetimibe. Bempedoic acid belongs to a group of drugs called adenosine triphosphate-citrate lyase (ACL) inhibitors. Ezetimibe belongs to a group of drugs called cholesterol absorption inhibitors.

Both Nexlizet and statins work by preventing your liver from making new cholesterol. Nexlizet does this by blocking ACL, which is an enzyme (a protein that speeds up the chemical processes in your body). But statins work by blocking a different enzyme, called HMG-CoA reductase.

If you take Nexlizet to reduce cholesterol, your doctor may prescribe Nexlizet with or without a statin drug. If you have questions about the differences between Nexlizet and statin drugs, talk with your doctor.

Does Nexlizet have to be used with a statin?

It’s possible, depending on your condition and treatment plan.

Nexlizet is approved to help reduce low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol with diet and exercise. For this purpose, it can also be prescribed in combination with or without a statin drug. Examples of statins include atorvastatin (Lipitor) and rosuvastatin (Crestor).

Nexlizet is also approved to help reduce the risk of heart attack and coronary revascularization (a type of heart procedure). Nexlizet is prescribed for this purpose when statins cannot be used.

Statins also help lower the risk of heart problems and death related to high cholesterol. It isn’t known how Nexlizet may affect these risks. If your doctor prescribes Nexlizet with a statin, it’s important to keep using the statin.

Certain statins may interact with Nexlizet, however. For more information, see the “Nexlizet interactions” section above. If you have questions about taking Nexlizet with statin drugs, talk with your doctor.

Are there other cholesterol-lowering drugs that are safe to use with Nexlizet?

Yes, there are other cholesterol-lowering drugs that are safe to use with Nexlizet.

Nexlizet may be used with statin drugs to help reduce LDL cholesterol. (See “Does Nexlizet have to be used with a statin?” just above for more information.)

But some people may have troublesome side effects from statins that prevent them from being able to take these drugs. People bothered by statin side effects may use Nexlizet without another medication or with other drugs that reduce LDL cholesterol instead of statins.

It’s important to note that there are limitations to using Nexlizet with certain cholesterol-lowering drugs. Examples of these drugs include fibrate drugs and bile acid sequestrants. For more information, see the “Nexlizet interactions” section above.

If you have questions about using Nexlizet with other drugs, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Could Nexlizet affect my liver or kidneys?

Yes, Nexlizet may affect the liver and kidneys.

In clinical studies, bempedoic acid was shown to increase levels of liver enzymes. (Bempedoic acid is one of Nexlizet’s active drugs.) Increased liver enzymes can be a sign that your liver isn’t working correctly.

Bempedoic acid was also shown to decrease kidney function. It can affect certain laboratory test levels or lead to blood in the urine. These kidney-related side effects were common in clinical trials of Nexlizet.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about how Nexlizet may affect your liver or kidneys.

Before taking Nexlizet, talk with your doctor about your health history. Nexlizet may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Gout: Nexlizet may cause hyperuricemia, which can lead to gout. You may be at higher risk for gout while taking Nexlizet if you’ve had gout in the past. For this reason, it’s important to tell your doctor if you have a history of gout before you start taking the drug. You’ll likely have your levels of uric acid monitored while you’re taking Nexlizet. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have any sudden pain, swelling, redness, or deepening of color in your joints while taking the drug. If you do, they may prescribe medications to lower your uric acid levels. For more information about this side effect, see “Hyperuricemia” in the “Nexlizet side effects” section above.
  • Tendon problems: can happen while taking Nexlizet. Your risk for this side effect may be higher if you have tendon problems or have had them in the past. Before you start Nexlizet treatment, tell your doctor if you have a history of tendon problems. If so, they may recommend a treatment other than Nexlizet for lowering your cholesterol levels. For more information about this side effect, see “Tendon ruptures” in the “Nexlizet side effects” section above.
  • Kidney problems: Tendon ruptures can happen while taking Nexlizet. Your risk for this side effect may be higher if you have kidney problems, such as kidney failure. If you have kidney problems, talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe for you to use Nexlizet.
  • Liver problems: Nexlizet may cause increased levels of liver enzymes. This can be a sign that your liver isn’t working correctly. If you have liver problems, such as liver failure, taking Nexlizet can worsen these problems. If you have liver problems, talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe for you to use Nexlizet.
  • Allergic reaction: If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Nexlizet or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take this drug. Ask your doctor about which other medications may be better options for you.
  • Pregnancy: It’s not known if Nexlizet is safe to use during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Nexlizet and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding: Breastfeeding isn’t recommended while taking Nexlizet. For more information, see the “Nexlizet and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Nexlizet, see the “Nexlizet side effects” section above.

Don’t use more Nexlizet than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Nexlizet

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call America’s Poison Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Nexlizet from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, ask your pharmacist how to correctly dispose of it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store it.

You should store Nexlizet tablets at room temperature, which is around 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). Keep Nexlizet tablets in their original container to protect against humidity.

In certain conditions, such as when traveling, you may temporarily store Nexlizet at temperatures of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C).

You should avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms. And don’t throw away the packet that helps keep your medication dry. You should store Nexlizet tablets with this packet inside the container.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Nexlizet and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.

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