Rhofade is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved in adults to treat persistent (ongoing) facial erythema, which is a symptom of rosacea. Erythema is skin redness.

Rosacea is a chronic (long-lasting) skin disease. It makes the skin red and causes papules and pustules. Papules are red bumps. These bumps can develop a center of pus, becoming pustules. Papules and pustules are also referred to as inflammatory lesions.

Typically, rosacea affects the skin on the cheeks, forehead, and nose.

Rhofade belongs to a class of drugs called alpha-1A receptor agonists. A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way. Alpha-1A receptor agonists work by attaching to alpha-1A receptors, which causes your blood vessels to narrow. (Alpha-1A receptors are “docking stations” found on blood vessels throughout your body.)

When applied to your face, Rhofade narrows the blood vessels near the surface of your skin. This helps reduce facial redness.

Rhofade comes as a topical cream that’s used once a day. You should apply a pea-sized amount in a thin layer over your cheeks, chin, forehead, and nose.

Rhofade contains the active drug oxymetazoline.

Effectiveness

To learn about the effectiveness of Rhofade, see the “Rhofade for rosacea” section.

Rhofade is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Rhofade contains the active drug oxymetazoline.

Rhofade can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Rhofade. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Rhofade, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs they have approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Rhofade, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Rhofade, explained below in “Side effect details,” can include*:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Rhofade. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Rhofade’s prescribing information.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Rhofade aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained below in “Side effect details,” include:

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Rhofade. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Rhofade. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Worsened rosacea

In rare cases, Rhofade may worsen inflammatory lesions associated with rosacea. Inflammatory lesions can include pimples or other acne-like red bumps called papules or pustules.

In clinical studies:

  • 1% to 3% of adults who used Rhofade had worsened inflammatory lesions.
  • Less than 1% of adults who used a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) had worsened inflammatory lesions.

If you’re concerned about your rosacea getting worse while using Rhofade, talk with your doctor.

Application site reactions

Application site reaction is a common side effect of Rhofade. In clinical studies of adults with rosacea, examples of side effects and how often they occurred include:

  • dry, red, or swollen skin: 2% to 3% who used Rhofade; 0% who used a placebo
  • itchy skin: 1% to 2% who used Rhofade; 1% who used a placebo
  • pain at the application site: 1% to 2% who used Rhofade; less than 1% who used a placebo
  • erythema (skin redness): 1% to 2% who used Rhofade; less than 1% who used a placebo

If you experience a bothersome reaction after applying Rhofade, talk with your doctor. They may be able to suggest ways to relieve this side effect.

You may wonder how Rhofade compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Rhofade and Mirvaso are alike and different.

Ingredients

Rhofade contains the active drug oxymetazoline. Mirvaso contains the active drug brimonidine.

Uses

Both Rhofade and Mirvaso are FDA-approved to treat persistent (ongoing) facial erythema in adults with rosacea. Erythema is skin redness.

Drug forms and administration

Rhofade comes as a cream, and Mirvaso comes as a gel. Both drugs are applied to your face once a day.

Both Rhofade and Mirvaso should be applied as a pea-sized amount in a thin layer over your cheeks, chin, forehead, and nose.

Side effects and risks

Rhofade and Mirvaso have some similar side effects and others that vary. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Rhofade and Mirvaso (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Rhofade:
    • worsened rosacea
    • pain at the application site

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Rhofade, with Mirvaso, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, studies have found both Rhofade and Mirvaso to be effective for treating facial redness in adults with rosacea.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Rhofade and Mirvaso generally cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Rhofade and Mirvaso are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Rhofade.

Will I see a big difference before and after I use Rhofade?

Results from using Rhofade may vary for different people. Some people may see a big improvement in their skin before and after using Rhofade. Others may not see a noticeable difference.

In clinical studies, Rhofade has been shown to reduce facial redness for up to 12 hours in adults with rosacea. To learn more about the drug’s effectiveness, see the “Rhofade for rosacea” section.

For pictures of results you may expect to see while using Rhofade, visit the manufacturer’s site.

Can I apply makeup over Rhofade?

Yes, you can apply makeup over Rhofade. It won’t affect how the product works.

However, certain makeup products may trigger a rosacea flare-up. The American Academy of Dermatology provides recommendations for selecting makeup products that are less likely to trigger a rosacea flare-up.

Tip: Using a green-tinted primer or concealer may help reduce the appearance of facial redness.

Will I be able to use sunscreen or other products on my face when I’m using Rhofade?

Yes, you can use sunscreen or other products on your face when using Rhofade. You may want to apply Rhofade before using them, however. This can help your skin absorb more of the drug than if you applied Rhofade after your other skin care products.

The sun may worsen your rosacea or trigger a rosacea flare. It’s important to wear sunscreen to reduce your risk for a rosacea flare.

Certain skin care products may also trigger a rosacea flare. The American Academy of Dermatology provides tips for choosing skin care products that are less likely to trigger a rosacea flare-up.

Will Rhofade cure my rosacea?

No, Rhofade will not cure your rosacea. There’s currently no cure for rosacea. However, Rhofade has been shown to reduce facial redness for up to 12 hours after use.

You’ll need to use Rhofade every day to reduce facial redness. You should also try to avoid other potential rosacea triggers. Examples of these triggers include:

  • stress
  • intense exercise
  • certain foods, such as alcohol, caffeine, and dairy products
  • exposure to extreme temperatures, such as hot baths or saunas

If you have questions about how Rhofade works or what your rosacea triggers may be, talk with your doctor.

What should I do if I accidentally swallow Rhofade?

If you or a child swallows Rhofade, call 911 or your local emergency phone number, or go to your local emergency room right away. However, if you’ve only swallowed a small amount of the drug, you can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool.

Swallowing Rhofade may cause serious side effects. Children accidentally swallowing other medications that contain oxymetazoline (the active drug in Rhofade) has caused the following symptoms:

  • nausea and vomiting
  • changes in heart rate
  • trouble breathing
  • changes in blood pressure
  • severe sleepiness and confusion
  • coma

These symptoms led to hospitalization.

To help keep children safe, make sure to store Rhofade out of their reach.

Rhofade is approved by the FDA to treat persistent (ongoing) facial erythema in adults with rosacea. Erythema is skin redness.

Rosacea is a chronic (long-lasting) skin disease. It makes the skin red and causes papules and pustules. Papules are red bumps. These bumps can develop a center of pus, becoming pustules. Papules and pustules are also referred to as inflammatory lesions.

Typically, rosacea only affects the skin on the cheeks, forehead, and nose. However, in some people, rosacea can also affect the chest, back, and ears.

The exact cause of rosacea isn’t known. However, people may be at a higher risk for rosacea if they have certain risk factors. These include having a bacterial infections (like bacillus oleronius or Helicobacter pylori), a family history of the condition, or having fair skin.

Rosacea may also cause:

Effectiveness for rosacea

Rhofade has been shown to be effective for reducing facial redness in adults with rosacea.

Effectiveness in two 29-day studies

In two clinical studies, adults were treated for 29 days with Rhofade or a placebo (a treatment with no active drug). Improvement in skin redness was recorded at hours 3, 6, 9, and 12 after the cream was applied. After 29 days:

  • at hour 3: 12% to 14% of adults who used Rhofade reported reduced facial redness, compared with 6% to 7% of adults who used a placebo
  • at hour 6: 13% to 16% of adults who used Rhofade reported reduced facial redness, compared with 5% to 8% of adults who used a placebo
  • at hour 9: 16% to 18% of adults who used Rhofade reported reduced facial redness, compared with 6% to 9% of adults who used a placebo
  • at hour 12: 12% to 15% of adults who used Rhofade reported reduced facial redness, compared with 6% of adults who used a placebo

As shown above, the results varied depending on the amount of time that had passed since the drug was applied. Improvement in redness may also depend on how many weeks the drug is used.

Effectiveness in a 52-week study

In a 52-week clinical study, adults with skin redness due to rosacea were treated with Rhofade. (Rhofade wasn’t compared with a different drug or a placebo in this study.) Improvement in skin redness was recorded at hours 3 and 6 after application of the cream.

After 4 weeks of treatment:

  • at hour 3: 19.5% of adults reported a reduction in facial redness
  • at hour 6: 23% of adults reported a reduction in facial redness

After 52 weeks of treatment:

  • at hour 3: 36.7% of adults reported a reduction in facial redness
  • at hour 16: 43.4% of adults reported a reduction in facial redness

Rhofade and children

Rhofade isn’t approved for use in children. It’s not known if Rhofade is safe or effective for children.

In many cases, Rhofade may be used with other medications to treat the symptoms of rosacea.

If you have questions about ways to relieve certain symptoms of rosacea, talk with your doctor. They may recommend other treatments that are safe to use with Rhofade.

Rhofade is FDA-approved to treat persistent (ongoing) facial erythema in adults with rosacea. Erythema is skin redness.

What happens with rosacea

Rosacea is a chronic (long-lasting) skin disease. It makes the skin red and causes papules and pustules. Papules are red bumps. These bumps can develop a center of pus, becoming pustules. Papules and pustules are also referred to as inflammatory lesions.

Typically, rosacea only affects the skin on the cheeks, forehead, and nose. However, in some people, rosacea can also affect the chest, back, and ears.

The exact cause of rosacea isn’t known. However, people with the following risk factors may be more likely to have rosacea:

  • Family history. Rosacea may be a genetic condition (inherited from family members).
  • Bacterial infection. Certain types of bacteria are common in people with rosacea. Examples of these bacteria include bacillus oleronius (bacteria carried by skin mites) and Helicobacter pylori(bacteria found in the gut).
  • Light skin tone. Rosacea is more common among fair-skinned people.

Common symptoms of rosacea include papules and pustules. Papules are red bumps. These bumps can develop a center of pus, becoming pustules. Papules and pustules are also referred to as inflammatory lesions.

In addition to papules and pustules, other symptoms of rosacea can include:

During a rosacea flare-up, you have increased symptoms from the condition. These flare-ups may occur in cycles. This means you may have flare-ups for weeks or months at a time, and then the flare-ups go away for a while.

What Rhofade does

Rhofade contains the drug oxymetazoline. It belongs to a class of drugs called alpha-1A receptor agonists. (A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Alpha-1A receptor agonists work by causing alpha-1A receptors on the walls of your blood vessels to tighten. This causes your blood vessels to become narrow.

Rhofade treats rosacea on your face by narrowing the blood vessels near the surface of your skin. This reduces the amount of blood flowing through those vessels, which helps lessen facial redness.

How long does it take Rhofade to work?

Rhofade starts working right away to reduce facial redness. However, it may take several days or weeks, for some, to notice an improvement in facial redness.

You should use Rhofade according to your doctor or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Rhofade comes as a cream that’s used once a day. You should apply a pea-sized amount in a thin layer over your cheeks, chin, forehead, and nose.

Rhofade shouldn’t be applied in the eyes, mouth, or vagina. You shouldn’t apply Rhofade to areas of skin that are infected or have an open wound. Be sure to wash your hands after applying Rhofade.

For step-by-step instructions on how to apply Rhofade, visit the manufacturer’s site.

When to use

You should use Rhofade once a day, at the same time every day. You can decide with your doctor the best time of day to apply the cream. In one clinical trial, people using Rhofade were instructed to apply it at the same time every morning.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Other drugs are available that can treat rosacea. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Rhofade, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed below are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat rosacea include:

  • adapalene (Differin)
  • azelaic acid (Azelex, Finacea)
  • brominidine gel (Mirvaso)
  • clindamycin lotion (Cleocin T)
  • clindamycin and benzoyl peroxide (BenzaClin)
  • doxycycline (Doryx, Oracea)
  • ivermectin cream (Soolantra)
  • metronidazole topical (Metrogel, Metrolotion)

Rhofade and Soolantra are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how these drugs are alike and different.

Ingredients

Rhofade contains the active drug oxymetazoline. Soolantra contains the active drug ivermectin.

Uses

Rhofade is FDA-approved to treat persistent (ongoing) facial erythema in adults with rosacea. Erythema is skin redness.

Soolantra is FDA-approved to treat a different symptom of rosacea. It’s used to treat inflammatory lesions associated with rosacea. Inflammatory lesions include pimples or other acne-like red bumps called papules or pustules.

Drug forms and administration

Both Rhofade and Soolantra come as creams that are applied to your face once a day. Both drugs should be applied as a pea-sized amount in a thin layer over your cheeks, chin, forehead, and nose.

Side effects and risks

Rhofade and Soolantra have some similar side effects and others that vary. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Rhofade and Soolantra (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Rhofade:
    • worsened rosacea
    • pain at the application site
    • erythema (skin redness)

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with both Rhofade and Soolantra:

Effectiveness

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, studies have found both Rhofade and Soolantra to be effective for treating rosacea.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Rhofade and Soolantra generally cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Rhofade and Soolantra are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Rhofade comes as a topical cream in a tube or pump. The tube and pump are both available in sizes of 30 grams or 60 grams of cream. Each gram of cream contains 10 mg of the active drug, oxymetazoline.

Note: The Rhofade pump may not be available in your area. If you’re interested in using the pump, ask your doctor or pharmacist if it’s available.

Dosage for rosacea

The recommended dosage for rosacea is one application of Rhofade cream once daily. You should apply a pea-sized amount in a thin layer over your cheeks, chin, forehead, and nose.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, apply your missed dose of Rhofade as soon as you can. If it’s almost time for your next dose, just skip your missed dose and apply your next dose at its regular time. Don’t make up for your missed dose by applying two doses at once. This could raise your risk for side effects.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Rhofade is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Rhofade is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

There are no known interactions between Rhofade and alcohol. However, drinking alcohol may trigger a rosacea flare-up. The American Academy of Dermatology suggests ways for you to reduce your risk for a rosacea flare-up when drinking alcohol.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink while using Rhofade.

Rhofade can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Rhofade and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Rhofade. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Rhofade.

Before taking Rhofade, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Rhofade and drugs that lower blood pressure

Rhofade belongs to a class of drugs called alpha-1A receptor agonists. (A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way.) This type of drug may increase your blood pressure. Using Rhofade with drugs that lower blood pressure may cause the blood pressure drugs to be less effective.

Examples of medications used to lower blood pressure include:

If you take medications that lower your blood pressure, talk with your doctor before using Rhofade.

Rhofade and alpha-1 blockers

Alpha-1 blockers are drugs that help lower blood pressure. They’re also used to help relieve the symptoms of an enlarged prostate. These drugs prevent alpha-1 receptors (docking stations on the blood vessels and prostate) from being activated. This helps blood vessels dilate (open).

Rhofade acts in the opposite way of alpha-1 blockers. Rhofade activates alpha-1 receptors on the walls of your blood vessels. This causes your blood vessel walls to tighten. The space inside the vessels becomes narrow, so less blood can flow through. This helps reduce facial redness.

Because Rhofade and alpha-1 blockers work in opposite ways, using them together may make the alpha-1 blockers less effective. This means they may not work as well at treating high blood pressure or an enlarged prostate.

If you take alpha-1 blockers, talk with your doctor about using these drugs with Rhofade.

Rhofade and monoamine oxidases inhibitors

Rhofade belongs to a class of drugs called alpha receptor agonists. This type of drug may raise your blood pressure. Monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs) are a class of drugs used to treat depression. These drugs may also raise blood pressure. Therefore, using Rhofade with MAOIs may increase your risk of high blood pressure even more.

Examples of MAOIs include:

  • phenelzine (Nardil)
  • selegiline (Emsam, Zelapar)

Talk with your doctor before using Rhofade if you’re taking an MAOI.

Rhofade and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Rhofade. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Rhofade.

Rhofade and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Rhofade. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Rhofade, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Rhofade can vary.

The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for Rhofade, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Rhofade, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Rhofade, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

EPI Health LLC, the manufacturer of Rhofade, offers a savings card that may help lower the cost of the drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for savings, call 855-631-2485 or visit the program website.

Generic version

Rhofade is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

It’s not known if this drug is safe to use during pregnancy. This drug hasn’t been studied in pregnant women.

Clinical studies looked at babies born to pregnant women who were given other drugs containing oxymetazoline (the active drug in Rhofade) during their second trimester of pregnancy.

These studies showed possible kidney problems in babies born to these women. However, it’s unknown whether kidney problems can occur in babies born to women who were given Rhofade during pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Rhofade.

It’s not known if Rhofade is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Rhofade.

For more information about taking Rhofade during pregnancy, see the “Rhofade and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Rhofade is safe to use while breastfeeding or if it can pass into breast milk. Talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Rhofade if you’re planning to breastfeed.

Before taking Rhofade, talk with your doctor about your health history. Rhofade may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Problems with blood pressure, blood vessels, or your heart. Rhofade belongs to a class of drugs called alpha receptor agonists. This type of drug may increase your blood pressure. If you have problems with your blood pressure, blood vessels, or heart, Rhofade may make these problems worse. You may not have any symptoms if these problems worsen. If you have a history of any problems with your blood pressure, blood vessels, or heart, your doctor will likely monitor you more closely during your treatment. This is to make sure these problems don’t get worse.
  • Problems with circulation or a history of stroke. Rhofade belongs to a class of drugs called alpha receptor agonists. This type of drug may narrow your blood vessels. Rhofade may prevent your blood from flowing properly, so be sure to tell your doctor if you have a history of blood circulation problems or stroke. Examples of problems with blood circulation include Raynaud’s disease, scleroderma, Sjogren’s syndrome, or thromboangiitis obliterans (Buerger’s disease).
  • Narrow-angle glaucoma. Using Rhofade if you have narrow-angle glaucoma may raise your risk for developing a more severe condition called closed-angle glaucoma. If you experience sudden, severe eye pain or vision changes while using Rhofade, this may be a sign of closed-angle glaucoma. Closed-angle glaucoma is a medical emergency. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number as soon as you start experiencing these symptoms.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Rhofade or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Rhofade. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s unknown if Rhofade is safe to use during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Rhofade and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Rhofade can pass into the breast milk during breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Rhofade and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Rhofade, see the “Rhofade side effects” section above.

You should not swallow Rhofade cream. Swallowing Rhofade can lead to serious side effects. You should only use Rhofade according to your doctor or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Overdose symptoms

The following symptoms may occur if Rhofade is swallowed:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve used too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Rhofade from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Rhofade cream should be stored at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). It can be stored at a temperature of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) for short periods of time, such as when traveling. Make sure to store Rhofade cream out of the reach of children.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Rhofade and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Rhofade is indicated for the treatment of persistent facial erythema in adults with rosacea.

Administration

Rhofade comes as a cream applied to the face once daily. A pea-size amount should be applied in a thin layer over the cheeks, chin, forehead, and nose. Rhofade is not for intravaginal, ophthalmic, or oral use and shouldn’t be applied to the eyes or lips.

Mechanism of action

Rhofade stimulates vasoconstriction of blood vessels under the surface of the skin via agonism of the alpha-1A adrenergic receptor.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Plasma concentrations of oxymetazoline were present following the first dose of topical Rhofade. The average peak plasma drug concentration following a single dose was 60.5 pg/mL. Comparable average peak plasma drug concentrations were observed after 28 days of once-daily application (66.4 pg/mL) and twice-daily application (68.8 pg/mL).

Rhofade undergoes minimal hepatic metabolism.

Contraindications

There are no known contraindications for the use of Rhofade.

Storage

Rhofade should be stored at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). Temperature excursions of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) are allowed.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.