Skyrizi is a brand-name prescription medication that’s FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. It’s used in adults who could benefit from systemic therapy (drugs that work throughout your body) or phototherapy (light therapy).

Plaque psoriasis is an autoimmune condition and the most common type of psoriasis. With this condition, red patches that are thick and scaly appear on the skin. Plaque psoriasis often affects the scalp, knees, elbows, and lower back.

Skyrizi is a type of drug called an interleukin-23 (IL-23) antagonist. It works by attaching to IL-23 proteins and reducing how much inflammation (swelling) occurs in the body. IL-23 proteins play a part in inflammation that can lead to plaque psoriasis.

Skyrizi comes as a prefilled syringe that’s given by subcutaneous injection (under your skin). When you first start using Skyrizi, your doctor will give you the injections at their office. They can also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe) if you’d like to start doing it yourself.

FDA approval

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved Skyrizi in 2019. It’s approved for use in adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who could benefit from systemic therapy or phototherapy.

Effectiveness

Clinical studies of adults with plaque psoriasis compared Skyrizi with a placebo (a treatment with no active drug). After 16 weeks:

  • 75% of those receiving Skyrizi reported at least a 90% improvement in their plaque psoriasis symptoms
  • 2% to 5% of those receiving a placebo reported at least a 90% improvement in their plaque psoriasis symptoms

For more information on Skyrizi’s effectiveness, see the “Skyrizi uses” section.

Skyrizi is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Skyrizi contains the active drug risankizumab-rzaa.

The Skyrizi dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Skyrizi to treat
  • other medical conditions you may have

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Skyrizi comes in prefilled syringes. The syringes are available in one strength: 75 mg.

The usual dose for Skyrizi is two prefilled syringes for a total dose of 150 mg. Skyrizi is given by subcutaneous injection (under your skin).

When you first start using Skyrizi, your doctor will give you the injections at their office. They can also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe) if you’d like to start doing it yourself.

Dosage for plaque psoriasis

A typical Skyrizi dosing schedule starts with loading doses at the beginning of treatment, followed by maintenance doses. (Loading doses give you more medication at the beginning of treatment, which can help get the best results.)

The first two doses of Skyrizi are loading doses. They’re given as two prefilled syringes (150 mg total) your first week of treatment and again at week 4 of treatment.

Each dose after that is a maintenance dose. (Maintenance doses help maintain the same level of medication in your body so it can be effective.) Maintenance doses of Skyrizi are given as two prefilled syringes every 12 weeks.

What if I miss a dose?

It’s important to keep your appointments with your doctor for Skyrizi injections. If you miss an appointment, call your doctor’s office right away to reschedule.

If you’re using Skyrizi at home and forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember and then talk with your doctor. They can help you adjust your schedule for your Skyrizi treatment.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder in your phone.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Skyrizi is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Skyrizi is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Skyrizi can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Skyrizi. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Skyrizi, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs they’ve approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Skyrizi, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects can include the following side effects*, which are explained in the “Side effect details” section:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Skyrizi. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or visit Skyrizi’s Medication Guide.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Skyrizi aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects are explained below in “Side effect details.” These include:

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug or whether certain side effects pertain to it. Here’s some detail on some of the side effects this drug may or may not cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Skyrizi. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Skyrizi. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Headache

Some people may experience headache during their Skyrizi treatment. In clinical studies:

  • 3.5% of people taking Skyrizi experienced headache
  • 2% of people taking a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) experienced headache

If you get headaches during your Skyrizi treatment, you can talk with your doctor about ways to relieve this side effect.

Fatigue

Skyrizi can cause fatigue in some people. In clinical studies:

  • 2.5% of people taking Skyrizi experienced fatigue
  • 1% of people taking a placebo experienced fatigue

If you’re concerned about fatigue during your Skyrizi treatment, talk with your doctor.

Infections

Skyrizi weakens your immune system, which could raise your risk for infections.

Symptoms of an infection will vary depending on the infection you have, but they may include:

  • fever, sweats, or chills
  • cough
  • muscle aches
  • sores on your body that are different from psoriasis
  • unexplained weight loss
  • abdominal (belly) pain
  • burning feeling when you urinate or urinating more often than usual

Talk with your doctor about ways to help prevent infections during your Skyrizi treatment.

Fungal infections

While taking Skyrizi, some people may have fungal infections that affect the skin. In clinical studies:

  • 1.1% of people taking Skyrizi had a fungal infection
  • 0.3% of people taking a placebo had a fungal infection

Upper respiratory infections

Some people may get an upper respiratory infection (such as the common cold) during their Skyrizi treatment. In clinical studies:

  • 13% of people taking Skyrizi had an upper respiratory infection
  • 9.7% of people taking a placebo had an upper respiratory infection

Serious infections

Serious infections may occur with Skyrizi. Skyrizi may worsen an existing infection or

cause a flare-up of a latent infection, such as tuberculosis (TB). (A latent infection is already inside your body, but you don’t have any symptoms from it.)

Less than 0.4% of people in clinical studies of Skyrizi had serious infections.

If you have a current infection or have had TB, talk with your doctor before starting Skyrizi. They may want to delay your Skyrizi treatment or prescribe you medication to take with Skyrizi.

Weight loss

Weight loss is not a direct side effect of Skyrizi. However, weight loss may be a symptom of a serious infection, which can be a side effect of Skyrizi. (See “Infections” directly above to learn more.)

If you experience unexplained weight loss during your Skyrizi treatment, call your doctor right away.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Skyrizi to treat certain conditions.

Skyrizi for plaque psoriasis

Skyrizi is approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. It’s used in adults who could benefit from systemic therapy (drugs that work throughout your body) or phototherapy (light therapy).

Plaque psoriasis is an autoimmune condition and the most common type of psoriasis. It causes thick, scaly, red patches appear on the skin. Plaque psoriasis often affects the scalp, knees, elbows, and lower back.

Effectiveness for plaque psoriasis

Clinical studies of adults with plaque psoriasis compared Skyrizi with a placebo (a treatment with no active drug). After 16 weeks:

For more information on Skyrizi’s effectiveness, see the drug’s package instructions.

Skyrizi uses under study

In addition to the use listed above, Skyrizi is being studied as a treatment for other conditions.

Skyrizi for Crohn’s disease

Skyrizi is currently being studied in a phase 3 clinical trial to treat Crohn’s disease that’s moderately to severely active. (In phase 3 clinical trials, a drug’s safety and effectiveness is compared with other treatments given for a specific condition or with a placebo.)

The Skyrizi trial include adults with Crohn’s disease who didn’t have success with past biologic treatment. (Biologics are medications made from living organisms rather than chemicals.)

Skyrizi for psoriatic arthritis

Skyrizi is currently being studied in a phase 3 clinical trial for use in people with psoriatic arthritis.

Specifically, it’s being studied in people who haven’t responded well to certain treatments in the past. These include biologic drugs and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs). Skyrizi is also being studied in those who can’t take biologics or DMARDs.

Skyrizi for atopic dermatitis

Skyrizi is currently being studied in a phase 2 trial as a treatment for moderate to severe atopic dermatitis. (Phase 2 clinical trials help determine whether the drug is effective.) The Skyrizi trial includes adults and children ages 12 years and older with atopic dermatitis.

Skyrizi for ulcerative colitis

Skyrizi is currently being studied in a phase 3 trial for use in people with ulcerative colitis who responded well to Skyrizi in other trials.

Another phase 3 trial is studying Skyrizi in people with moderately to severely active ulcerative colitis who didn’t have success with past biologic treatment.

Skyrizi and children

Skyrizi is not approved for use in children. Skyrizi hasn’t been studied in children, so it’s not known if the drug is safe or effective for them to use.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Skyrizi, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat plaque psoriasis. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for plaque psoriasis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat plaque psoriasis include:

You may wonder how Skyrizi compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Skyrizi and Humira are alike and different.

Ingredients

Skyrizi contains the active drug risankizumab-rzaa. Humira contains the active drug adalimumab.

Uses

Skyrizi and Humira are both FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. It’s used in adults who may benefit from systemic therapy (drugs that work throughout your body) or phototherapy (light therapy).

Humira is also approved to treat:

Drug forms and administration

Skyrizi comes as a prefilled syringe. It’s given as a subcutaneous injection (under your skin).

Humira comes in three forms: a single-dose pen, a single-dose prefilled syringe, and a single-dose vial of liquid solution. Like Skyrizi, Humira is given as a subcutaneous injection.

Both Skyrizi and Humira can be given at your doctor’s office. Your doctor can also teach you how to give yourself injections at home if you’d like to start doing it yourself.

Side effects and risks

Skyrizi and Humira have some similar side effects and others that vary. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with Skyrizi, with Humira or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Humira or with both drugs (when taken individually).

* Humira has boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

Effectiveness

The use of Skyrizi and Humira in treating severe plaque psoriasis has been directly compared in a clinical study.

The researchers found that after 16 weeks:

  • 72% of people taking Skyrizi had a 90% improvement in their plaque psoriasis symptoms
  • 47% of people taking Humira had a 90% improvement in their plaque psoriasis symptoms

Costs

Skyrizi and Humira drug are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Skyrizi may cost more than Humira. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan, your location, and if applicable, the pharmacy you use.

Skyrizi and Tremfya are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how these drugs are alike and different.

Ingredients

Skyrizi contains the active drug risankizumab-rzaa. Tremfya contains the active drug guselkumab.

Uses

Skyrizi and Tremfya are both FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adults. It’s used in adults who may benefit from systemic therapy (drugs that work throughout your body) or phototherapy (light therapy).

Drug forms and administration

Skyrizi and Tremfya both come as a prefilled syringe and are given by subcutaneous injection (under your skin).

Both Skyrizi and Tremfya can be given at your doctor’s office. Your doctor can also teach you how to give yourself injections at home if you’d like to start doing it yourself.

Side effects and risks

Skyrizi and Tremfya have some similar side effects and others that vary. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug or with both Skyrizi and Tremfya (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with both Skyrizi and Tremfya (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

Skyrizi and Tremfya haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, studies have found both Skyrizi and Tremfya to be effective for treating moderate to severe plaque psoriasis.

Costs

Skyrizi and Tremfya are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Skyrizi may cost more than Tremfya. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug will depend on your insurance plan, your location, and if applicable, the pharmacy you use.

Skyrizi is given by subcutaneous injection (under your skin). When you first start using Skyrizi, your doctor will give you the injections at their office. They can also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe) if you’d like to start doing it yourself.

How to inject Skyrizi

If you’re giving yourself Skyrizi injections at home, follow your doctor or healthcare provider’s instructions.

AbbVie Inc., the manufacturer of Skyrizi, provides a video that explains how to use the injection pen. They also provide written step-by-step instructions.

Read the instructions carefully before your first self-injection. If you’re still unsure of how to do it, ask your doctor or pharmacist for more guidance on how to inject Skyrizi.

When it’s given

The first two doses of Skyrizi are usually loading doses given in weeks 1 and 4 of your treatment. (Loading doses give you more medication at the beginning of treatment, which can help get the best results.)

Once loading doses are completed, maintenance doses of Skyrizi are given every 12 weeks. (Maintenance doses help maintain the same level of medication in your body so it can be effective.)

You can take Skyrizi at any time of the day. If you’re giving yourself injections at home, take Skyrizi at the time that best fits your schedule.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Note: For more information on the Skyrizi dosing schedule, see the “Skyrizi dosage” section.

There are no known interactions between Skyrizi and alcohol.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink during your Skyrizi treatment.

Skyrizi can interact with live vaccines.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Skyrizi and live vaccines

You shouldn’t get live vaccines during your Skyrizi treatment. For live vaccines, you’re injected with a small amount of a virus so your body can learn to fight it.

You shouldn’t get these vaccines while using Skyrizi because the drug may weaken your immune system. If this happens, your body won’t be able to properly fight the vaccine, and it may make you sick.

Live vaccines you should avoid while taking Skyrizi include:

Before you begin taking Skyrizi, talk with your doctor about whether you need any live vaccines. You and your doctor may decide to delay treatment with Skyrizi until after you’ve received any live vaccines you need.

Skyrizi and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Skyrizi. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Skyrizi.

Skyrizi and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Skyrizi. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Skyrizi, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Skyrizi can vary.

The actual price you’ll pay will depend on your insurance plan, your location, and if applicable, the pharmacy you use.

It’s important to note that you’ll have to get Skyrizi at a specialty pharmacy. This type of pharmacy is authorized to carry specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before they approve coverage for Skyrizi. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Skyrizi, contact your insurance plan.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Skyrizi, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

AbbVie, the manufacturer of Skyrizi, offers a program called MyAbbVie Assist. This program may help lower the cost of Skyrizi, whether you have commercial insurance or are uninsured. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 1-800-222-6885 or visit the program website.

Generic version

Skyrizi is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Skyrizi is FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis in adults who could benefit from systemic therapy (drugs that work throughout your body) or phototherapy (light therapy).

About plaque psoriasis

Plaque psoriasis is an autoimmune condition and the most common type of psoriasis. With this condition, thick, scaly, red patches appear on the skin. Plaque psoriasis often affects the scalp, knees, elbows, and lower back.

What Skyrizi does

Skyrizi is a type of drug called an interleukin-23 (IL-23) antagonist. It works by attaching to IL-23 proteins and helps reduce how much inflammation (swelling) occurs in the body. IL-23 proteins play a part in inflammation that can lead to plaque psoriasis.

When Skyrizi attaches to IL-23 proteins, it blocks them from causing inflammation. It also prevents them from turning on other immune system cells. This can result in less inflammation, fewer symptoms, and an improvement in your condition.

Skyrizi is a biologic medication. Biologics are medications made from living organisms rather than chemicals. (Non-biologic drugs are made from chemicals.)

How long does it take to work?

Skyrizi starts working right after your first injection. However, it may take a few doses before you notice an improvement in your symptoms.

It isn’t known if Skyrizi is safe to use during pregnancy. Animal studies have shown some risk to the fetus when Skyrizi is given to a pregnant female. However, animal studies don’t always predict what will happen with humans.

Talk with your doctor right away if you become pregnant, or think you may be pregnant, while taking Skyrizi.

It’s not known if Skyrizi is safe to take during pregnancy. Therefore, if you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, you should talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Skyrizi.

For more information about taking Skyrizi during pregnancy, see the “Skyrizi and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Skyrizi passes into breast milk. If you’re considering Skyrizi treatment while breastfeeding, talk with your doctor about the benefits and risks.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Skyrizi.

Is Skyrizi a biologic?

Yes. Skyrizi is a biologic drug. Biologics are medications made from living organisms rather than chemicals. (Non-biologic drugs are made from chemicals.)

Skyrizi works to reduce inflammation (swelling) and help prevent plaque formation in people with psoriasis.

Does Skyrizi cause weight gain or weight loss?

It’s not likely. Skyrizi is not known to cause weight gain or weight loss. However, weight loss may be a symptom of a serious infection, which can be a side effect of Skyrizi. (See the “Skyrizi side effects” section above for more information.)

Call your doctor right away if you experience unexplained weight loss during your Skyrizi treatment.

How can I lower my risk of infection while taking Skyrizi?

Skyrizi treatment weakens your immune system, which can raise your risk for infection. Examples of these infections include fungal infections and upper respiratory infections.

However, you can take steps to help prevent infections during your treatment. These include:

  • staying up to date on vaccines that your doctor recommends for you (see the question below to learn more)
  • practicing good hand hygiene, such as washing your hands with soap often
  • getting enough sleep
  • avoiding contact with people who are sick, if possible

Are there any vaccines I should avoid during my Skyrizi treatment?

While taking Skyrizi, you should avoid live vaccines. With live vaccines, you’re injected with a small amount of a virus so your body can learn to fight it.

You shouldn’t get these vaccines while using Skyrizi because the drug may weaken your immune system. If this happens, your body won’t be able to properly fight the vaccine, and it may make you sick.

Live vaccines to avoid while taking Skyrizi include:

Before you begin taking Skyrizi, talk with your doctor about whether you may need any live vaccines. You and your doctor may decide to delay your Skyrizi treatment until after you’ve received any live vaccines you need.

Will Skyrizi cure my plaque psoriasis?

No, Skyrizi does not cure plaque psoriasis. There’s currently no cure for this disease. However, Skyrizi can help to relieve your psoriasis symptoms. This includes reducing redness and plaque scales.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about how Skyrizi will work to treat your psoriasis.

Before taking Skyrizi, talk with your doctor about your health history. Skyrizi may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Current infections or history of repeated infections. You shouldn’t take Skyrizi if you currently have an infection or if you’ve had infections in the past that kept coming back. If you develop an infection while taking Skyrizi, tell your doctor right away.
  • Tuberculosis (TB). If you have active TB (with symptoms) or latent TB (no symptoms), you may need TB treatment before starting Skyrizi. Your doctor will order a TB test before you start treatment. You should not take Skyrizi if you have active TB.
  • Pregnancy. It isn’t known if Skyrizi is safe to use during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Skyrizi and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Skyrizi passes into breast milk. For more information, see the “Skyrizi and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Skyrizi, see the “Skyrizi side effects” section above.

Do not use more Skyrizi than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Skyrizi from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the package. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Skyrizi syringes should be stored in the refrigerator between 36°F and 46°F (2°C to 8°C).

Keep the syringes in their original package to keep away from light. Do not shake or freeze Skyrizi.

Disposal

Right after you’ve used a syringe, needle, or autoinjector, dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needle. You can buy a sharps container online, or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Skyrizi is approved for use in adults with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis who could benefit from systemic therapy or phototherapy.

Administration

Skyrizi is administered subcutaneously in the thigh or abdomen. Skyrizi treatment initiation consists of two loading doses, given 4 weeks apart. After the second loading dose is administered, the maintenance dosing for Skyrizi is given every 12 weeks.

The full dose of Skyrizi is given as two prefilled syringes (150 mg total), given one right after the other.

Mechanism of action

Skyrizi contains the humanized monoclonal antibody risankizumab-rzaa. It blocks interleukin-23 (IL-23) by binding directly to the p19 subunit of the molecule, which blocks IL-23 from binding with its receptor. Blocking IL-23 activity prevents activation of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Absolute bioavailability is up to 89% following subcutaneous injection. Peak concentration occurs in 3 to 14 days. Steady-state concentration is reached by week 16.

Skyrizi degrades to small peptides and amino acids via catabolism. Elimination half-life is approximately 28 days.

Contraindications

Skyrizi doesn’t have any contraindications. Use caution in people with a history of serious hypersensitivity reaction to the drug or any of its components.

Vaccines

People receiving Skyrizi should avoid getting live vaccines.

Storage

Skyrizi should be stored in the refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Store in the original container to protect from light. Do not freeze or shake. Allow Skyrizi to sit at room temperature for 15 to 30 minutes prior to administration.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.