Takhzyro (lanadelumab-flyo) is a brand-name prescription medication that’s FDA-approved to help prevent (prophylaxis) attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE). This drug is approved for use in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

HAE is a genetic condition that causes serious swelling, usually in your arms, legs, face, or intestines. It may also cause you to have pain or trouble breathing. Without treatment, you may have swelling episodes every 1 to 2 weeks, with each lasting 3 to 4 days.

Takhzyro works by preventing these swelling attacks from occurring. It belongs to a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. (A class of medications is a group of drugs that work in a similar way.)

Takhzyro form

Takhzyro comes as a liquid solution in a vial. The drug is given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection just under the skin) once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks.

Before your first dose, a healthcare provider will train you (or your caregiver) on how to self-inject the medication. This training will take place at your home or in a healthcare setting. After you’ve learned how to self-inject, you’ll likely do so at home for all future doses.

Takhzyro is available in one strength: 300 mg/2 mL.

FDA approval

In 2018, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved Takhzyro for the prevention of HAE attacks.

Effectiveness

In clinical trials, Takhzyro was an effective medication to help prevent attacks of HAE. People who took the recommended dose of 300 mg of Takhzyro every 2 weeks had 87% fewer HAE attacks than people who took a placebo. The placebo was an injection with no active drug in it.

The Takhzyro group also had 87% fewer HAE attacks that needed acute (immediate but short-term) treatment over 182 days than the placebo group. In addition, people who took Takhzyro had 83% fewer attacks that were considered moderate or severe than people who took a placebo.

Takhzyro is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in biosimilar form.

A biosimilar drug is a medication that’s similar to a brand-name biologic medication (the parent drug). Takhzyro is a biologic medication that’s also called a biologic.

Biologics are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A generic, on the other hand, refers to drugs made from chemicals. A generic is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication.

Biosimilars are considered to be just as safe and effective as their parent drug. And like generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

Active drug

Takhzyro contains the active drug lanadelumab, which is also known as lanadelumab-flyo. The “-flyo” ending shows that the medication is distinct from similar drugs that may be created sometime in the future. Other biologics are named in a similar manner.

The Takhzyro dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Takhzyro comes as a liquid solution in a vial. The drug is given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection just under the skin) once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks.

Before your first dose, a healthcare provider will train you (or your caregiver) on how to self-inject the medication. This training will take place at your home or in a healthcare setting. After you’ve learned how to self-inject, you’ll likely do so at home for all future doses.

If you’re giving yourself a dose of Takhzyro, you’ll inject the medication into your belly or thigh. If someone else is giving you the dose, they’ll inject it into your upper arm, belly, or thigh.

Takhzyro is available in one strength: 300 mg/2 mL.

Dosage for hereditary angioedema

The Takhzyro dosage for the prevention of hereditary angioedema (HAE) attacks is one injection of 300 mg every 2 weeks.

In some cases, if you haven’t had an attack for more than 6 months, your doctor may decrease your dosage to one injection every 4 weeks. It’s important that you talk with your doctor before changing your dose. You should never decrease your dosage on your own.

Pediatric dosage

Takhzyro is approved for use in children ages 12 years and older. The dosage for helping prevent HAE attacks in children is one injection of 300 mg every 2 weeks.

In some cases, your child’s doctor may reduce the dosage to one injection every 4 weeks. They may do this if your child hasn’t had an HAE attack for more than 6 months.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Takhzyro, call your doctor or pharmacist. They may recommend that you take your dose right away or wait and take it at your next scheduled time.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. It may also help to put your treatment schedule in a calendar.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Takhzyro is meant to be used as a long-term treatment in the prevention of HAE. If you and your doctor determine that Takhzyro is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

Takhzyro can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Takhzyro. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Takhzyro, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs they’ve approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Takhzyro, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Takhzyro can include*:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Takhzyro. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist or view Takhzyro’s Patient Information.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Takhzyro aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained in more detail below in “Side effect details,” include allergic reaction.

Side effects in children

Takhzyro is approved for use in children ages 12 years and older. In clinical trials, side effects in children were the same as side effects in adults. See the “Takhzyro side effects” section above for more information about side effects.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on some of the side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Takhzyro. A clinical trial of people with hereditary angioedema (HAE) found the following:

  • One person in the group who took 300 mg of Takhzyro every 2 weeks had two mild allergic reactions, including mouth tingling and itching.
  • In comparison, no one who took a placebo had this type of allergic reaction. (The placebo was an injection with no active drug in it.)

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

Some of the allergic reactions that occurred with Takhzyro in clinical trials were considered serious. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Takhzyro. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life-threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

If you have an allergic reaction to Takhzyro that’s serious, your doctor may have you stop taking the drug.

Injection site reaction

Injection site reactions are a common side effect with Takhzyro. Because this medication is injected under your skin, it may cause irritation in that area. In clinical trials of people with HAE, researchers found the following:

  • 56% of people who took the recommended dose of Takhzyro (300 mg every 2 weeks) reported an injection site reaction
  • 34% of people who took a placebo also had an injection site reaction

The most common injection site reactions include pain, bruising, or redness. Other possible reactions include bleeding under the skin, swelling, a warm and tingling feeling, or hardening of the skin.

If you have an injection site reaction that’s bothersome to you, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend ways to ease this side effect.

Upper respiratory infection

Upper respiratory infections (URIs), such as the common cold, may occur with Takhzyro. In clinical trials of people with HAE, URIs occurred in:

  • 44% of people who took the recommended dose (300 mg every 2 weeks) of Takhzyro
  • 32% of people who took a placebo

Symptoms of a URI may include congestion (stuffy nose), sore throat, or a cough.

If you’re taking Takhzyro and have a URI that’s bothersome to you or if you develop URIs often, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend ways to ease this side effect or suggest a different medication for your HAE.

Headache

Headaches are a possible side effect of Takhzyro use. In clinical trials of people with HAE, researchers found the following:

  • 33% of people who took the recommended dose (300 mg every 2 weeks) of Takhzyro had headaches
  • 22% of people who took a placebo also had headaches

If you’re having headaches that are severe or bothersome to you while using Takhzyro, talk with your doctor. They may be able to recommend ways to ease the number and severity of your headaches.

Rash

A rash may develop with Takhzyro use. However, this wasn’t a common side effect that was seen in clinical trials of people with HAE. The results showed that:

  • 4% of people who took the recommended dose (300 mg every 2 weeks) of Takhzyro had a rash
  • 5% of people who took a placebo also had a rash

If you develop a rash while taking Takhzyro, talk with your doctor. They’ll determine what’s causing the rash and suggest the best treatments.

Other drugs are available that can help prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE). Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Takhzyro, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Alternatives for hereditary angioedema

Examples of other drugs that may be used to help prevent attacks of HAE include:

  • human C1 esterase inhibitor (Berinert, Haegarda, Cinryze, Ruconest)
  • icatibant acetate (Firazyr)
  • ecallantide (Kalbitor)

You may wonder how Takhzyro compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Takhzyro and Cinryze are alike and different.

Ingredients

The active drug ingredient in Takhzyro is lanadelumab-flyo. The active drug ingredient in Cinryze is human C1 esterase inhibitor.

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Takhzyro and Cinryze to help prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE).

Takhzyro is approved for use in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

Cinryze is approved for use in in adults as well as children ages 6 years and older.

Drug forms and administration

Takhzyro comes as a liquid solution in a vial. The drug is given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection just under the skin) once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks.

Cinryze comes as a powder in a vial. The drug is mixed with sterile water to create a liquid solution. Cinryze is given as an intravenous (IV) injection every 3 or 4 days. An IV injection is given into your vein.

Before your first dose of Takhzyro or Cinryze, a healthcare provider will train you (or your caregiver) on how to self-inject the medication. This training will take place at your home or in a healthcare setting. After you’ve learned how to self-inject, you’ll likely do so at home for all future doses.

Side effects and risks

Takhzyro and Cinryze both contain drugs to help prevent HAE attacks. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug, or with both Takhzyro and Cinryze (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Takhzyro, with Cinryze, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

The only condition both Takhzyro and Cinryze are used for is the prevention of HAE attacks.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies, but studies have found both Takhzyro and Cinryze to be effective for preventing HAE attacks.

Costs

According to estimates on WellRx.com, the cost of Takhzyro and Cinryze will vary depending on your treatment plan. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug also depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Takhzyro and Cinryze are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no biosimilar forms of either drug.

A biosimilar drug is a medication that’s similar to a brand-name biologic medication (the parent drug). Takhzyro and Cinryze are both biologic medications, which are also called biologics.

Biologic medications are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A generic medication, on the other hand, is an exact copy of a brand-name drug that’s made from chemicals.

Biosimilars are considered to be just as safe and effective as their parent drug. And like generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

Like Cinryze (above), the drug Haegarda has uses similar to those of Takhzyro. Here’s a comparison of how Takhzyro and Haegarda are alike and different.

Ingredients

The active drug ingredient in Takhzyro is lanadelumab-flyo. The active drug ingredient in Haegarda is human C1 esterase inhibitor.

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Takhzyro and Haegarda to help prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE). Both drugs are approved for use in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

Drug forms and administration

Takhzyro comes as a liquid solution in a vial.

Haegarda comes as a powder in a vial. The drug is mixed with sterile water to create a liquid solution.

Both drugs are given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection just under the skin).

Before your first dose, a healthcare provider will train you (or your caregiver) on how to self-inject the medication. This training will take place at your home or in a healthcare setting. After you’ve learned how to self-inject, you’ll likely do so at home for all future doses.

Takhzyro is given once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks. Haegarda is given twice a week.

Side effects and risks

Takhzyro and Haegarda both contain medications to treat HAE. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with each drug or with both Takhzyro and Haegarda (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Takhzyro:
    • rash
    • muscle pain
  • Can occur with Haegarda:
    • no unique mild side effects
  • Can occur with both Takhzyro and Haegarda:
    • injection site reactions (such as pain, redness, or bruising in the area of the injection)

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Takhzyro, with Haegarda, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

The only condition both Takhzyro and Haegarda are used for is the prevention of HAE attacks.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies, but studies have found both Takhzyro and Haegarda to be effective for preventing HAE attacks.

Costs

According to estimates on WellRx.com, the cost of Takhzyro and Haegarda will vary depending on your treatment plan. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug also depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Takhzyro and Haegarda are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no biosimilar forms of either drug.

A biosimilar drug is a medication that’s similar to a brand-name biologic medication. Takhzyro and Haegarda are both biologic medications, which are also called biologics.

Biologic medications are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A generic medication, on the other hand, is an exact copy of a brand-name drug that’s made from chemicals.

Biosimilars are considered to be just as safe and effective as their parent drug. And like generics, biosimilars tend to cost less than brand-name medications.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Takhzyro to treat certain conditions. Takhzyro may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Takhzyro for hereditary angioedema

Takhzyro is FDA-approved for the prevention of attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE). This drug is approved for use in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

HAE is a genetic condition that causes serious swelling, usually in your arms, legs, face, or intestines. It may also cause you to have pain or trouble breathing.

HAE attacks may be caused by stress, illnesses like the cold or flu, physical activity, or trauma. Some medications for high blood pressure and hormonal birth control can also trigger HAE. In addition, HAE may occur without a known cause.

Usually, the first symptoms happen during childhood and may worsen during the teenage years. Without treatment, you may have swelling episodes every 1 to 2 weeks, with each lasting 3 to 4 days. Takhzyro works by helping prevent these swelling attacks from occurring.

Effectiveness for preventing hereditary angioedema attacks

In clinical trials, Takhzyro was an effective medication to help prevent attacks of HAE. People took 300 mg of Takhzyro or a placebo once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks. (The placebo was an injection with no active drug in it.) The results showed the following:

  • People who took Takhzyro once every 2 weeks had 87% fewer HAE attacks than people who took a placebo.
  • People who took Takhzyro once every 4 weeks had 73% fewer HAE attacks than people who took a placebo.

Researchers also looked at how often people had HAE attacks needed treatment over 182 days. People took 300 mg of Takhzyro or a placebo once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks. The results showed that compared with people who took a placebo:

  • People who took Takhzyro once every 2 weeks had 87% fewer HAE attacks that required acute (immediate but short-term) treatment.
  • People who took Takhzyro once every 2 weeks also had 83% fewer attacks that were considered moderate or severe.
  • People who took Takhzyro once every 4 weeks had 74% fewer attacks that required acute treatment.
  • People who took Takhzyro once every 4 weeks also had 73% fewer attacks that were considered moderate to severe.

Takhzyro and children

Takhzyro is approved for use in children ages 12 years and older.

Children ages 12 to 17 years were included in a clinical trial of Takhzyro. In this study, children had similar results to adults in the prevention of HAE attacks. For clinical trial data, see the section above called “Takhzyro for hereditary angioedema.”

There are no known interactions between Takhzyro and alcohol.

If you have questions about drinking alcohol while using Takhzyro, talk with your doctor.

Takhzyro is not known to interact with other drugs. However, no drug interaction studies of Takhzyro have been done at this time. Takhzyro is also not known to interact with any herbs, supplements, or foods.

Takhzyro and other medications

Takhzyro is not known to interact with other medications. However, before taking Takhzyro, talk with your doctor and pharmacist.

Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Takhzyro and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Takhzyro. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Takhzyro.

Takhzyro and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Takhzyro. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Takhzyro, talk with your doctor.

Takhzyro and lab tests

Takhzyro may affect the results of an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) blood test. This may also be referred to as a PTT test.

An aPTT test measures how long it takes for your blood to clot. Takhzyro may cause the aPTT result to be higher than it really is.

However, clinical trials didn’t show any increased risks of bleeding or changes in the international normalized ratio (INR). The INR is another test that measures how long it takes for blood to clot.

While you take Takhzyro, be sure to tell your doctor if you’re having any blood tests they might not know about.

As with all medications, the cost of Takhzyro can vary. To find current prices for Takhzyro in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

It’s important to note that you’ll have to get Takhzyro at a specialty pharmacy. This type of pharmacy is authorized to carry specialty medications. These are drugs that may be expensive or may require help from healthcare professionals to be used safely and effectively.

Before approving coverage for Takhzyro, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Takhzyro, contact your insurance plan.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Takhzyro, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, the manufacturer of Takhzyro, offers a program called OnePath.

This program provides resources such as training on how to give yourself the Takhzyro injections at home and access to a patient support manager.

If you have commercial insurance, you may also quality for the Co-Pay Assistance Program, which could help lower the cost of Takhzyro.

For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 866-888-0660 or visit the OnePath program website.

Biosimilar version

Takhzyro is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in biosimilar form.

A biosimilar drug is a medication that’s similar to a brand-name biologic medication (the parent drug). Takhzyro is a biologic medication, which is also called a biologic.

Biologic medications are made from living cells. It’s not possible to copy these drugs exactly. A generic medication, on the other hand, is an exact copy of a brand-name drug that’s made from chemicals.

Biosimilars are considered to be just as safe and effective as their parent drug.

You should take Takhzyro according to your doctor or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Takhzyro comes as a liquid solution in a vial. The drug is given as a subcutaneous injection (an injection just under the skin).

Before your first dose, a healthcare provider will train you (or your caregiver) on how to self-inject the medication. This training will take place at your home or in a healthcare setting. After you’ve learned how to self-inject, you’ll likely do so at home for all future doses.

If you’re giving yourself a dose of Takhzyro, you’ll inject the medication into your belly or thigh. If someone else is giving you the dose, they’ll inject it into your upper arm, belly, or thigh.

You’ll need to take Takhzyro out of the refrigerator 15 minutes before using the medication. You should follow the drugmaker’s step-by-step instructions to take your dose of Takhzyro. Your dose should be injected within 2 hours of preparing it.

Talk with your doctor or pharmacist if you have any questions about the proper way to take your dose.

When to take

You’ll typically take Takhzyro once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks.

You should have your dose of Takhzyro on the same day of the week so that the level of medication in your body is consistent. For example, if you take your first dose on a Wednesday, you should keep taking your dose 2 or 4 weeks later on a Wednesday.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. It may also help to put your treatment schedule in a calendar.

Hereditary angioedema (HAE) is a genetic condition that causes serious swelling, usually in your arms, legs, face, or intestines. It may also cause you to have pain or trouble breathing.

People with HAE don’t produce enough C1 inhibitor protein. This protein is important because it decreases the activity of kallikrein (a protein that helps control your blood pressure).

With a low level of C1 inhibitor protein, kallikrein becomes too active.

Kallikrein normally produces a peptide called bradykinin, and when kallikrein is too active, it makes more bradykinin than usual. And bradykinin is the main cause of HAE symptoms such as swelling attacks and pain.

Takhzyro works by blocking kallikrein from working as much. This leads your body to make less bradykinin. As a result, Takhzyro helps prevent your HAE symptoms from occurring. For a video of how Takhzyro works, see the manufacturer’s website.

How long does it take to work?

It may take about 4 to 5 days for Takhzyro to be at its highest concentration in your body, when it can begin helping prevent HAE attacks. However, it may take around 70 days until the drug reaches a consistent level and has its full effect in your system.

It’s not known if Takhzyro is safe to take during pregnancy because there haven’t been any clinical trials of people who have used the drug while pregnant.

In animal studies, no problems were reported in babies born to animals that were given Takhzyro. However, animal studies don’t always show what will happen in humans.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor before using Takhzyro. They can review the pros and cons of the medication with you.

It’s not known if Takhzyro is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Takhzyro.

For more information about taking Takhzyro during pregnancy, see the “Takhzyro and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Takhzyro is safe to take while breastfeeding. There haven’t been any clinical studies of people who have used the drug while breastfeeding. However, Takhzyro was present in small amounts in the milk of breastfeeding animals.

If you’re breastfeeding or are planning to, talk with your doctor before taking Takhzyro. They can review the pros and cons of the medication with you.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Takhzyro.

Will Takhzyro cure my hereditary angioedema?

No, Takhzyro won’t cure your hereditary angioedema (HAE). Instead, the drug will work to help prevent attacks of HAE from occurring.

In order for the medication to keep working to prevent attacks, you need to have a consistent amount in your body. For this reason, you have to take your dose every 2 weeks or every 4 weeks, as directed by your doctor.

Is Takhzyro made from human blood or plasma?

No. Takhzyro isn’t made from human blood or plasma (a part of blood that’s mostly water). In fact, Takhzyro is the only medication used for HAE that isn’t made with human blood or plasma.

Because Takhzyro doesn’t have any blood products in it, there’s no risk of getting a disease that’s transmitted through blood by taking this medication.

For more information on how Takhzyro is made, watch “The making of Takhzyro” video on the drug manufacturer’s website. You can also talk with your doctor or pharmacist about any questions that you may have.

Does Takhzyro come ready to use?

No, Takhzyro doesn’t come ready to use. There are several steps involved before you can take the medication. These include letting Takhzyro come to room temperature, turning the vial to mix the drug, and cleaning the rubber stopper.

You’ll also need to draw Takhzyro out of the vial with a syringe.

For detailed directions on how to prepare this medication, see the drugmaker’s step-by-step instructions.

Will Takhzyro increase my risk for bleeding?

No. Takhzyro shouldn’t increase your risk for bleeding. However, the medication may affect the results of a blood test called an activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test. This may also be referred to as a PTT test.

An aPTT test measures how long it takes for your blood to clot. And Takhzyro may cause the aPTT result to be higher than it really is. But keep in mind that you’re not more likely to bleed while taking the medication.

If you’re concerned about bleeding during your Takhzyro treatment, talk with your doctor.

Can I use Takhzyro to treat a flare-up of hereditary angioedema?

No, you shouldn’t use Takhzyro to treat flare-ups (attacks) of HAE.

However, because HAE flare-ups can occur at any time, your doctor will probably recommend that you also keep a faster-acting treatment on hand. This may be called an acute treatment. You would use it only for a short time to treat an HAE flare-up.

You may also need to use the acute treatment when you first start taking Takhzyro. This is because it could take time for enough Takhzyro to build up in your system to help prevent HAE attacks. By treating your flare-up right away, you may be able to help prevent HAE symptoms, such as pain and swelling.

The recommendation of the World Allergy Organization / European Academy of Allergy and Clinical Immunology is that everyone using long-term drugs such as Takhzyro to treat HAE should also have medication for flare-ups.

Examples of medications that your doctor may recommend to treat HAE flare-ups include:

  • ecallantide (Kalbitor)
  • icatibant (Firazyr)
  • C1-esterase inhibitor (Berinert, Ruconest)

If you have any questions about how to treat a flare-up of HAE, talk with your doctor. They can recommend the best treatment options and how to use them.

Before taking Takhzyro, talk with your doctor about your health history. Takhzyro may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Takhzyro or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Takhzyro. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Takhzyro is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, please see the “Takhzyro and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Takhzyro is safe to take while breastfeeding. For more information, please see the “Takhzyro and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Takhzyro, see the “Takhzyro side effects” section above.

Do not use more Takhzyro than your doctor recommends. Overdose effects are unknown and have not been studied in clinical practice.

What to do in case you take too much Takhzyro

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Takhzyro from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the box. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time.

The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Prepared syringe

Once you prepare your Takhzyro dose, you should use the medication within 2 hours. If you can’t use it within that time frame, put the prepared syringe back into the refrigerator. You can keep it in the refrigerator for 8 hours. After that time, you should dispose of the syringe.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store Takhzyro in a refrigerator from 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). To protect the drug from light, keep the medication in its original carton.

Disposal

Right after you’ve used a syringe or needle, dispose of it in an FDA-approved sharps disposal container. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident or harming themselves with the needle. You can buy a sharps container online, or ask your doctor, pharmacist, or health insurance company where to get one.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Takhzyro is approved to help prevent attacks of hereditary angioedema (HAE) in adults as well as children ages 12 years and older.

Administration

Takhzyro is a subcutaneous injection that is usually given every 2 weeks. It can also be given every 4 weeks in patients who have not had an HAE attack for at least 6 months.

Patients can be taught to self-administer, or caregivers may administer the medication. It’s injected into the upper arm, thigh, or abdomen.

Mechanism of action

Patients with HAE have a lower level of C1 inhibitor protein than they should. C1 inhibitor protein is responsible for regulating the amount of kallikrein in the body.

Takhzyro works by binding to kallikrein. Kallikrein is the protein that forms bradykinin, which causes the symptoms of HAE, including pain and swelling.

By binding to kallikrein, Takhzyro decreases its activity, therefore decreasing the level of bradykinin that’s present. With a lower level of bradykinin, patients may have fewer HAE attacks.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Maximum plasma concentrations are reached at around 4 to 5 days after dosing. The half-life of Takhzyro is 14.2 days when it’s dosed every 4 weeks and 15 days when it is dosed every 2 weeks.

However, steady state of Takhzyro was not reached until about 70 days after the first dose.

Contraindications

There are no contraindications to taking Takhzyro.

Storage

Takhzyro should be stored in the refrigerator from 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). To protect it from light, the drug should be stored in its original carton.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.