Clobex is a brand-name prescription drug that’s FDA-approved to treat certain skin conditions. It comes as a shampoo, lotion, or spray. Depending on the form of Clobex that’s prescribed, this drug can be used to treat the following conditions:

  • Moderate to severe psoriasis. Psoriasis is an immune condition that affects your skin. With psoriasis, you may have scales or red, itchy patches on your skin that are sometimes painful. Clobex spray and Clobex lotion are approved for use in people with plaque psoriasis. And Clobex shampoo is approved for use in people with psoriasis that affects their scalp.
  • Skin inflammation or itchiness that’s caused by dermatoses. Dermatoses is a general term that describes skin conditions that cause inflammation or itching. Examples of dermatoses include eczema, plaque psoriasis, and certain other rashes. For this use, Clobex lotion is approved for people whose dermatosis has improved in the past with corticosteroids.

Clobex can be prescribed for people ages 18 years and older. For more information about the approved uses of Clobex, see the section “Clobex uses” below.

Limitations of use

The manufacturer of Clobex has given the following limitations for these products:

  • Shampoo. This form of Clobex should only be used on your scalp. It shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, or armpits. Also, be sure to avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If contact with any of these areas does occur, you should rinse them with water to wash away all of the shampoo.
  • Lotion and spray. These forms of Clobex should only be used on certain areas of your skin as directed by your doctor. The lotion and spray shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, or armpits. And you shouldn’t use these products on thin skin (areas in which the skin is fragile and likely to tear or bruise). In addition, Clobex lotion and Clobex spray shouldn’t be used to treat rosacea or perioral dermatitis (a condition that commonly causes a rash around your mouth).

Clobex’s ingredient, forms, and strengths

Clobex is a very strong topical corticosteroid. It contains the active drug clobetasol.

Clobex is available in one strength: 0.05%. It comes in the following forms:

  • Shampoo. This form of Clobex comes in bottles that hold 4 fluid ounces (118 mL).
  • Lotion. This form of Clobex comes in bottles that hold:
    • 2 fluid oz (59 mL)
    • 4 fluid oz (118 mL)
  • Spray. This form of Clobex comes in bottles that hold:
    • 2 fluid oz (59 mL)
    • 4.25 fluid oz (125 mL)

Clobex’s effectiveness

For information on the effectiveness of each form of Clobex, see the section “Clobex uses” below.

Clobex contains one active drug ingredient: clobetasol.

Clobex is available as a generic drug called clobetasol. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Keep in mind that in some cases, a brand-name drug and its generic version may come in different forms and strengths. For example, like Clobex, clobetasol is available as shampoo, lotion, and spray. But clobetasol is also available in other forms.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Clobex to treat certain conditions. Clobex may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Clobex for psoriasis

All three forms of Clobex (shampoo, lotion, and spray) are approved to treat psoriasis.

Psoriasis is an immune condition that affects your skin. With psoriasis, your skin cells divide more quickly than usual and can build up. The extra skin cells may then form scales or patches that are red, itchy, and sometimes painful.

But because Clobex is a strong steroid, it should only be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve your psoriasis. For most people, this means they would use Clobex until their psoriasis clears up.

Below, we describe how each form of Clobex is prescribed for psoriasis and how effective it is for the condition.

Clobex shampoo for psoriasis

Clobex shampoo is approved to treat moderate to severe scalp psoriasis. It can be prescribed for people ages 18 years and older.

It’s important to note that you should only use Clobex shampoo topically on your scalp. The shampoo shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, or armpits. Also, be sure to avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If contact with any of these areas does occur, you should rinse them with water to wash away all of the shampoo.

Effectiveness of Clobex shampoo for psoriasis

Clobex shampoo was evaluated in two clinical studies of people with moderate to severe scalp psoriasis. In both studies, people used either Clobex shampoo or a placebo shampoo that contained no active drug.

The people used either product once daily. They applied the product to their scalp and left it there for 15 minutes before lathering and rinsing. In both studies, treatment was continued for 4 weeks.

In the first study:

  • 42.1% of people who used Clobex had their scalp psoriasis clear up either mostly or completely.
  • 2.1% of people who used the placebo had the same result.

And in the second study:

  • 28.3% of people who used Clobex had their scalp psoriasis clear up either mostly or completely.
  • 10.2% of people who used the placebo had the same result.

Clobex lotion for psoriasis

Clobex lotion is approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. It can be prescribed for people ages 18 years and older.

It’s important to note that you should only use Clobex lotion topically on areas of your skin that are affected by psoriasis. But don’t use this lotion on your face, groin, or armpits. And you shouldn’t use the product on areas of thin skin (areas in which the skin is fragile and likely to tear or bruise). Also be sure to avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If contact with any of these areas does occur, you should rinse them with water to wash away all of the lotion.

Also, keep in mind that Clobex lotion shouldn’t be used to treat rosacea or perioral dermatitis (a condition that commonly causes a rash around your mouth).

Effectiveness of Clobex lotion for psoriasis

One clinical study looked at using Clobex lotion in people with moderate to severe psoriasis. Some people used Clobex lotion, while other people used a placebo lotion that contained no active drug. Both groups of people used the products twice daily.

In this 4-week study:

  • 36.6% of people who used Clobex had their psoriasis significantly improve. In this study, having their condition improve meant the people had either very mild redness, plaque elevation, and scaling. Or it meant they had an absence of these symptoms.
  • No one using the placebo had their psoriasis improve.

Clobex spray for psoriasis

Clobex spray is approved to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis that affects up to 20% of your body surface area (BSA). For this use, Clobex spray can be prescribed for people ages 18 years and older.

It’s important to note that you should only use Clobex spray topically on areas of your skin that are affected by psoriasis. But don’t use this product on your face, groin, or armpits. Also, avoid using the spray on areas of thin skin (areas in which the skin is fragile and likely to tear or bruise). And be sure to avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If contact with any of these areas does occur, you should rinse them with water to wash away all of the spray.

Also, keep in mind that Clobex spray shouldn’t be used to treat rosacea or perioral dermatitis (a condition that commonly causes a rash around your mouth).

Effectiveness of Clobex spray for psoriasis

In two separate clinical studies, Clobex spray was tested in people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Some people used Clobex spray, while other people used a placebo spray that contained no active drug. In both of the studies, people used either spray twice daily.

In the first study, after 4 weeks of treatment:

  • 53% of people who used Clobex had their psoriasis clear up almost completely.
  • 3% of people who used the placebo had the same result.

In the second study, after 4 weeks of treatment:

  • 52% of people who used Clobex had their psoriasis clear up almost completely.
  • 2% of people who used the placebo had the same result.

Clobex for skin conditions, such as eczema

Clobex lotion is approved to treat skin inflammation or itchiness that’s caused by dermatoses. Dermatoses is a general term that describes skin conditions that can cause inflammation or itching. Examples of dermatoses include:

For this use, Clobex lotion is prescribed for people whose dermatosis has improved in the past with corticosteroids. And it’s approved for this use in people ages 18 years and older.

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, this lotion should only be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve your skin condition. For most people, this means they would use Clobex until their skin symptoms improve.

It’s important to note that Clobex lotion should only be used topically on areas affected by certain skin conditions. And it shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, or armpits. You should also avoid using it on thin skin (areas in which the skin is fragile and likely to tear or bruise). And be sure to avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If contact with any of these areas does occur, you should rinse them with water to wash away all of the spray.

Also, keep in mind that Clobex lotion shouldn’t be used to treat rosacea or perioral dermatitis (a condition that commonly causes a rash around your mouth).

Effectiveness of Clobex lotion for skin conditions

In a clinical study, Clobex lotion was tested in people with moderate to severe dermatitis (skin inflammation). Some people used Clobex lotion, while other people used a placebo lotion that contained no active drug. The people used either treatment twice daily for 2 weeks.

In this study:

  • 42.7% of people who used Clobex had their dermatitis improve or go away completely.
  • 12.1% of people who used the placebo lotion had the same result.

Off-label uses for Clobex

In addition to the uses listed above, Clobex may be used off-label for other purposes. Off-label drug use is when a drug that’s approved for one or more uses is prescribed for a different one that’s not approved. Below is an example of off-label use for Clobex.

Clobex for alopecia

Clobex isn’t approved to treat alopecia (hair loss). But in some cases, the drug is used off-label for this condition. Specifically, Clobex is sometimes prescribed off-label for people with alopecia areata. With alopecia areata, your immune system attacks your hair follicles, leading to hair loss.

Clobetasol (the active drug in Clobex) has been studied in people with alopecia areata. A 2003 study looked to see if the drug would help hair regrow in people with this condition.

In the study, people used 2.5 grams of clobetasol ointment on their scalp each day. They then covered their treated scalp with plastic film. After 6 months of treatment, 28.5% of people using the drug had some of their hair regrow.

If you have questions about using Clobex for areas of hair loss on your body, talk with your doctor. They can recommend appropriate treatment options.

Clobex and children

Clobex isn’t recommended for use in people younger than 18 years of age. This is because Clobex may be absorbed into their body and cause certain side effects.

However, for some people younger than 18 years of age, their doctor may recommend Clobex treatment. This may be the case if their doctor determines that the benefit of using Clobex outweighs the risks.

If you’re younger than 18 years of age and you’re interested in using Clobex, talk with your doctor. They can recommend whether it’s safe for you to use this medication.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Clobex, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed below are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for Clobex shampoo

Clobex shampoo is used to treat moderate to severe scalp psoriasis. Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat scalp psoriasis include:

Alternatives for Clobex spray

Clobex spray is used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Examples of other spray or foam products that may be used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis include:

Alternatives for Clobex lotion

Clobex lotion is used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis include:

  • corticosteroids other than Clobex, such as:
  • retinoid cream or gel, such as tazarotene (Tazorac)
  • calcineurin inhibitors, such as:
    • tacrolimus ointment (Protopic)
    • pimecrolimus cream (Elidel)

Clobex lotion can also be used to treat skin disorders, such as eczema or other rashes. Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat skin disorders that cause itching or inflammation include:

  • corticosteroids other than Clobex, such as:
    • mometasone lotion (Elocon)
  • over-the-counter (OTC) lotions, such as:
    • Aveeno lotion
    • CeraVe lotion
    • Eucerin lotion

You may wonder how Clobex compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Clobex and Diprolene are alike and different.

Ingredients

Clobex contains the active drug clobetasol, while Diprolene contains the active drug betamethasone dipropionate. Both of these medications are corticosteroids that are used topically on your skin.

Uses

Depending on the form of Clobex that’s prescribed, this drug can be used to treat the following conditions:

  • Moderate to severe psoriasis. Psoriasis is an immune condition that affects your skin. With psoriasis, you may have scales or red, itchy patches on your skin that are sometimes painful. Clobex spray and Clobex lotion are approved for use in people with plaque psoriasis. And Clobex shampoo is approved for use in people with psoriasis that affects their scalp.
  • Skin inflammation or itchiness that’s caused by dermatoses. Dermatoses is a general term that describes skin conditions that cause inflammation or itching. Examples of dermatoses include eczema, plaque psoriasis, and certain other rashes. For this use, Clobex lotion is approved for people whose dermatosis has improved in the past with corticosteroids.

Clobex can be prescribed for people ages 18 years and older. For more information about the approved uses of Clobex, see the section “Clobex uses” above.

Diprolene is also approved to treat inflammation and itching that’s related to certain dermatoses. It’s approved for this use in people ages 13 years and older whose condition improved in the past with corticosteroids.

Drug forms and administration

Clobex comes as a shampoo, lotion, and spray. It’s used topically on affected areas of your skin as your doctor recommends.

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, it should be used for the least amount of time that’s needed to treat your condition. It’s usually recommended that you use Clobex for only 2 weeks in a row when you start treatment. But in some cases, your doctor may extend Clobex treatment for another 2 weeks. This usually depends on how your condition responds to treatment and which form of Clobex you’re using.

For more information on Clobex dosing and how to use the drug, see the sections “Clobex dosage” and “How to use Clobex” below.

Diprolene is available only as an ointment. It’s applied topically in a thin layer to affected areas of your skin as directed by your doctor. Diprolene is used once or twice daily for up to 2 weeks.

Side effects and risks

Clobex and Diprolene both contain a corticosteroid. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Note: Your side effects may vary from those listed below, depending on the form of Clobex you’re using.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with Clobex, with Diprolene, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Clobex:
    • burning or stinging in the area where you apply the drug
    • headache, which only occurs with Clobex shampoo
    • sore throat, which only occurs with Clobex spray
    • runny nose, which only occurs with Clobex spray
  • Can occur with Diprolene:
    • no unique mild side effects
  • Can occur with both Clobex and Diprolene:
    • skin discoloration in the area where you apply the drug
    • dry and itchy skin
    • skin redness
    • widening of small blood vessels in your skin, which makes the vessels more visible

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Clobex, with Diprolene, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. But separate studies have found both Clobex and Diprolene to be effective in treating certain skin disorders that cause inflammation and itching.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Clobex generally costs more than Diprolene. However, the actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Clobex and Diprolene are both brand-name drugs. However, clobetasol (the active drug in Clobex) and betamethasone dipropionate (the active drug in Diprolene) are available as generic medications. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand-name drugs do.

Like Diprolene, which is discussed above, other medications are also prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Clobex and Enstilar are alike and different.

Ingredients

Clobex contains one active drug: the corticosteroid clobetasol.

Enstilar, on the other hand, contains the following two active drugs:

Uses

Depending on the form of Clobex that’s prescribed, this drug can be used to treat the following conditions:

  • Moderate to severe psoriasis. Psoriasis is an immune condition that affects your skin. With psoriasis, you may have scales or red, itchy patches on your skin that are sometimes painful. Clobex spray and Clobex lotion are approved for use in people with plaque psoriasis. And Clobex shampoo is approved for use in people with psoriasis that affects their scalp.
  • Skin inflammation or itchiness that’s caused by dermatoses. Dermatoses is a general term that describes skin conditions that cause inflammation or itching. Examples of dermatoses include eczema, plaque psoriasis, and certain other rashes. For this use, Clobex lotion is approved for people whose dermatosis has improved in the past with corticosteroids.

Clobex can be prescribed for people ages 18 years and older. For more information about the approved uses of Clobex, see the section “Clobex uses” above.

Enstilar is also approved to treat plaque psoriasis. It can be prescribed for people ages 12 years and older.

Drug forms and administration

Clobex comes as a shampoo, lotion, and spray. It’s used topically on affected areas of your skin as your doctor recommends.

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, it should be used for the least amount of time that’s needed to treat your condition. It’s usually recommended that you use Clobex for only 2 weeks in a row when you start treatment. But in some cases, your doctor may extend Clobex treatment for another 2 weeks. This usually depends on how your condition responds to treatment and which formulation of Clobex you’re using.

For more information on Clobex dosing and how to use the drug, see the sections “Clobex dosage” and “How to use Clobex” below.

Enstilar comes as a foam that’s applied topically to affected areas of your skin. It’s used once daily for up to 4 weeks, as directed by your doctor.

Side effects and risks

Clobex and Enstilar both contain a corticosteroid. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Note: Your side effects may vary from those listed below, depending on the form of Clobex you’re using.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with Clobex, with Enstilar, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

  • Can occur with Clobex:
    • burning or stinging in the area where you apply the drug
    • headache, which only occurs with Clobex shampoo
    • sore throat, which only occurs with Clobex spray
    • runny nose, which only occurs with Clobex spray
  • Can occur with Enstilar:
    • no unique mild side effects
  • Can occur with both Clobex and Enstilar:
    • skin discoloration in the area where you apply the drug
    • dry and itchy skin
    • skin redness
    • widening of small blood vessels in your skin, which makes the vessels more visible

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Clobex, with Enstilar, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Effectiveness

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. But separate studies have found both Clobex and Enstilar to be effective in treating psoriasis.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Clobex generally costs less than Enstilar. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Clobex and Enstilar are both brand-name drugs. However, clobetasol (the active drug in Clobex) and calcipotriene/betamethasone dipropionate (the active drugs in Enstilar) are available as generic medications. Generic drugs usually cost less than brand-name drugs do.

You should use Clobex according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Clobex comes as a shampoo, lotion, and spray. It’s used topically on affected areas of your skin as directed by your doctor. Below, we describe how each form of Clobex is typically used. But be sure to follow the dosage and instructions for use that your doctor provides.

To help make sure that you don’t forget to apply the medication, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

How to use Clobex spray

Your doctor will tell you how much Clobex spray to use and how long you should use the drug. Make sure to use Clobex spray only the way your doctor directs.

Clobex spray should only be applied topically to affected areas of your skin. But it shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, armpits, or areas of thin skin (areas in which the skin is fragile and likely to tear or bruise). Also, avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If Clobex spray gets in these areas, rinse them thoroughly with water.

Clobex spray is usually applied twice daily. And it’s best to apply the spray to skin that’s clean and dry.

Keep in mind that Clobex spray is flammable. So you should avoid using the product near heat or open flames, or while you’re smoking.

Directions for how to use Clobex spray

Below, we briefly describe how to apply Clobex spray. For more detailed instructions on how to use Clobex spray, view the drug’s prescribing information.

  1. To apply Clobex spray, begin by unlocking the bottle’s spray nozzle. To do this, flip the nozzle up, and then turn it to either to the left or the right.
  2. Point the nozzle to the area of skin where you want to apply the medication. Push down on the bottle’s pump to begin spraying.
  3. Gently rub the Clobex spray into the affected area of skin. Don’t cover or wrap the treated area (unless your doctor instructed you to do so).
  4. When you’re done applying the medication, return the bottle’s spray nozzle back to its locked position.
  5. Wash your hands thoroughly to rinse away any medication that may be on them.

How long to use Clobex spray

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, this spray should only be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve your condition.

It’s recommended that you use Clobex spray for only 2 weeks in a row when you first start treatment. Then if needed, your doctor may recommend that Clobex treatment be continued for another 2 weeks. They’ll recommend this if you still have small areas of moderate to severe psoriasis that didn’t improved during the first 2 weeks of treatment.

Your doctor will recommend how long it’s safe for you to use Clobex spray. They’ll advise this based on how well your condition responds to the drug and whether you’re having any side effects.

How much Clobex spray to use

It’s recommended that you don’t use more than the following amounts of Clobex spray:

  • 26 sprays with each application
  • 52 sprays each day
  • 50 g (59 mL or 2 fluid oz) each week

How to use Clobex shampoo

Your doctor will tell you how much Clobex shampoo to use and how long to use the medication. Make sure to use Clobex shampoo only the way your doctor directs.

Clobex shampoo should only be used topically on affected areas of your scalp. It shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, or armpits. Also, avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If Clobex shampoo gets in these areas, rinse them thoroughly with water.

Clobex shampoo is typically applied once daily, at least 15 minutes before you take a shower. It should be applied to your scalp when your hair is dry.

Directions for how to use Clobex shampoo

Below, we briefly describe how to apply Clobex shampoo. For more detailed instructions on how use Clobex shampoo, you can view the drug’s prescribing information.

  1. To use Clobex shampoo, you’ll need to apply the drug to your scalp when your hair is dry. First, part your hair so that the affected area of your scalp is visible.
  2. Gently squeeze the Clobex shampoo bottle over the affected area of your scalp to apply the product.
  3. Gently rub the shampoo into your scalp until the affected area is covered with a thin layer of shampoo.
  4. Make sure to wash your hands thoroughly when you’re done applying Clobex.
  5. Leave Clobex shampoo on your scalp for 15 minutes. But don’t cover your head with a bandage, shower cap, or towel while the shampoo is on your scalp (unless your doctor instructed you to do so).
  6. After 15 minutes have passed, lather and rinse your hair until all the shampoo has been washed out. (You won’t need to use a non-medicated shampoo after this, but you can if you’d like to.)
  7. Rinse your entire body so that the Clobex shampoo is washed away from any areas it may have come into contact with.

How long to use Clobex shampoo

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, this shampoo should only be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve your condition. It’s recommended that you don’t use Clobex shampoo for more than 4 weeks in a row, unless your doctor tells you to do so.

How much Clobex shampoo to use

It’s recommended that you don’t use more than 50 g (50 mL or 1.75 fluid oz) of Clobex shampoo each week.

How to use Clobex lotion

Your doctor will tell you how much Clobex lotion to use and how long you should use the drug. Make sure to use Clobex only the way your doctor directs.

Clobex lotion should only be used topically on affected areas of your skin. But it shouldn’t be used on your face, groin, or armpits. Also, avoid contact with your eyes and lips. If Clobex lotion gets in these areas, rinse them thoroughly with water.

Clobex lotion is typically used twice daily. It’s best to apply the lotion to skin that’s clean and dry.

Directions for how to use Clobex lotion

Below, we briefly describe how to apply Clobex lotion. For more detailed instructions on how use Clobex lotion, you can view the drug’s prescribing information.

  1. When applying Clobex lotion, you can put the lotion directly onto affected areas of your skin. Or you can place the lotion on your fingertips and then apply it to the affected areas.
  2. Gently rub the lotion into the affected area. Don’t cover or wrap the treated area (unless your doctor instructed you to do so).
  3. Wash your hands thoroughly when you’re done applying the lotion.

How long to use Clobex lotion

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, this lotion should only be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve your condition. Typically, treatment shouldn’t last longer than 2 weeks.

How much Clobex lotion to use

It’s recommended that you don’t use more than 50 grams (50 mL or 1.75 fluid ounces) of Clobex lotion each week.

Clobex can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Clobex. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Clobex, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Clobex, you can do so through MedWatch.

Your side effects may vary from those listed below depending on which form of Clobex you’re using. They may also vary given the condition you’re using Clobex to treat.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Clobex can include:*

  • acne
  • burning or stinging in the area you apply the drug
  • dry or itchy skin
  • skin redness
  • widening of small blood vessels in your skin, which makes the vessels more visible
  • skin discoloration in the area you apply the drug
  • headache, which only occurs with Clobex shampoo
  • inflamed hair follicles, which only occurs with Clobex shampoo
  • sore throat, which only occurs with Clobex spray
  • runny nose, which only occurs with Clobex spray

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

*This is a partial list of mild side effects from Clobex. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view the prescribing information for the form of Clobex that you’re taking:

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Clobex aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Skin thinning. Symptoms can include:
    • having your skin tear or bruise more easily than usual
    • having more veins under your skin that are visible
  • Skin infections. Symptoms can include:
    • fever
    • blistering
    • increasing swelling or redness
    • areas with pus or other fluids draining
  • Upper respiratory tract infection, which only occurs with Clobex spray. Symptoms can include:
    • cough
    • sore throat
    • shortness of breath
    • fever
    • runny nose or sneezing
  • Eczema, which only occurs with Clobex spray. Symptoms can include:
    • itching
    • areas of swelling
    • skin redness
    • thickening of your skin
  • Eye pain and irritation. Symptoms can include:
    • redness of your eye
    • swelling or itching in your eye
  • Cataracts (cloudiness in the lens of your eye) and glaucoma (increased pressure in your eye). Symptoms can include:
    • blurred vision
    • loss of vision
    • eye pain
  • Worsening psoriasis. Symptoms include:
    • thickening of your psoriasis plaques
    • increased skin flaking
    • having plaques on more areas of your body than usual

Other serious side effects, explained in more detail below in “Side effect details,” include:

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on several of the side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Clobex. But it’s not known for sure how many people using Clobex have had an allergic reaction to the drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Clobex. But call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Hair loss

It’s possible to have hair loss (alopecia) while you’re using Clobex. In fact, hair loss occurred in some people using Clobex shampoo during clinical trials. But it’s not known how many people using the shampoo had hair loss. And keep in mind that this side effect hasn’t been reported in people using Clobex lotion or Clobex spray.

It’s interesting to note that clobetasol (the active drug in Clobex) has been studied as a treatment option for alopecia areata. (With this condition, your immune system attacks your hair follicles, leading to hair loss.) For more information about this, see the section “Clobex uses” above.

If you’re losing hair while you’re using Clobex, talk with your doctor. They may recommend ways to help reduce your hair loss. Or they may recommend a medication other than Clobex for you.

Skin irritation

Skin discomfort and irritation are common side effects of Clobex. Symptoms of skin irritation can include:

  • pain
  • redness
  • rash
  • peeling
  • burning

Skin irritation most commonly occurs in the areas where you apply Clobex. It doesn’t usually effect areas on your body where you don’t apply the drug.

If you have skin irritation or discomfort while you’re using Clobex, talk with your doctor. They’ll be able to advise if the side effect is normal with Clobex use. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a medication other than Clobex for you to use.

How often does skin irritation occur with Clobex use?

Below, we describe how often skin irritation occurred in people using each form of Clobex during clinical studies:

  • Clobex lotion. In studies, 1.3% of people with either psoriasis or eczema who used Clobex lotion had skin irritation. There weren’t any people in this study using a different drug or a placebo (treatment with no active drug).
  • Clobex shampoo. In studies, 4.7% of people with scalp psoriasis who used Clobex shampoo had skin irritation. In comparison, skin irritation occurred in 12.6% of people who used a placebo shampoo that contained no active drug.
  • Clobex spray. In studies, 42% of people with certain skin conditions who used Clobex spray had skin irritation. In comparison, skin irritation occurred in 47% of people who used a placebo spray that contained no active drug.

Hormone effects

Clobex is a very strong corticosteroid. And as with all corticosteroids, if it’s used over a long period of time, Clobex can affect hormones in your body. However, hormone changes from Clobex are usually reversible, which means they go away when you stop using the medication.

Examples of hormone-related conditions that Clobex may cause include:

  • Adrenal insufficiency. With this condition, your adrenal glands don’t produce enough hormones. Symptoms of adrenal insufficiency can include feeling tired or having muscle weakness. You may also have nausea, vomiting, and low blood pressure.
  • Cushing’s syndrome. With this condition, you have too much of the hormone cortisol in your body. Symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome can include weight gain, thinning of your skin, and tiredness. You may also have high blood pressure.
  • Increased blood sugar level. Clobex can increase your blood sugar level. The drug may even cause the onset of diabetes in people who already have the condition but aren’t aware of it.

If you have symptoms of hormone-related conditions while you’re using Clobex, call your doctor right away. They can check to see what’s causing your symptoms. And in some cases, your doctor may recommend that you stop using Clobex.

How often do hormone effects occur with Clobex use?

Below, we describe how often hormone certain hormone problems occurred during clinical studies in people using each form of Clobex:

  • Clobex lotion. In a study of people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis, Clobex lotion was compared with clobetasol cream. (Clobetasol is the active drug in Clobex.) In this study, 80% of people who used Clobex had adrenal suppression after 4 weeks of treatment. And 30% of people who used clobetasol cream had adrenal suppression.
  • Clobex shampoo. One study looked at adolescents with scalp psoriasis who used Clobex shampoo. In this study, after 4 weeks of treatment, 41.6% of people had adrenal suppression. There weren’t any people in the study taking a different medication or a placebo (treatment with no active drug).
  • Clobex spray. In studies, Clobex spray was given to people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis. There weren’t any people taking a different medication or placebo (treatment with no active drug). In these studies 19% of people had adrenal suppression after 2 weeks of treatment. And 15% to 20% of people had adrenal suppression after 4 weeks of treatment.

Keep in mind that how Clobex affects your hormones will depend on your age and the condition being treated. It also depends on how long you use Clobex and several other factors, such if you’re taking any other medications with it.

The Clobex dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Clobex to treat
  • your age
  • the form of Clobex you’re using
  • other medical conditions you may have

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Clobex contains the active drug clobetasol. It’s available in one strength: 0.05%.

Clobex comes in the following forms:

  • Shampoo. This form of Clobex is used to treat scalp psoriasis. It’s available in bottles that hold 4 fluid ounces (118 mL).
  • Lotion. This form of Clobex is used to treat dermatosis, including eczema and plaque psoriasis. It’s available in bottles that hold:
    • 2 fluid oz (59 mL)
    • 4 fluid oz (118 mL)
  • Spray. This form of Clobex is used to treat plaque psoriasis. It’s available in bottles that hold:
    • 2 fluid oz (59 mL)
    • 4.25 fluid oz (125 mL)

Dosage of Clobex spray

Typically, Clobex spray is applied to affected areas of your skin twice daily. But your doctor will tell you exactly how much Clobex spray to use and how long you should use the drug. Make sure to use Clobex only the way your doctor directs.

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, this spray should only be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve your condition.

It’s recommended that you use Clobex spray for only 2 weeks in a row when you first start treatment. If needed, your doctor may then recommend that you continue Clobex treatment for another 2 weeks. They’ll recommend this if you still have small areas of moderate to severe psoriasis that didn’t improved during the first 2 weeks of treatment.

In addition, it’s recommended that you don’t use more than the following amounts of Clobex spray:

  • 26 sprays with each application
  • 52 sprays each day
  • 50 grams (59 mL or 2 fluid oz) each week

Dosage of Clobex shampoo

Clobex shampoo is typically applied to your scalp once daily, at least 15 minutes before you take a shower. It should be applied to your scalp when your hair is dry.

Your doctor will tell you exactly how much Clobex shampoo to use and how long to use the medication. Make sure to use Clobex shampoo only the way your doctor directs.

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, Clobex shampoo should always be used for the least amount of time that’s needed improve your condition. It’s recommended that you don’t use Clobex shampoo for more than 4 weeks in a row, unless your doctor tells you to do so.

It’s recommended that you don’t use more than 50 g (50 mL or 1.75 fluid oz) of Clobex shampoo each week.

Dosage of Clobex lotion

Typically, Clobex lotion is used twice daily. But your doctor will tell you exactly how much Clobex lotion to use and how long you should use the drug. Make sure to use Clobex only the way your doctor directs.

Your doctor will determine how long it’s safe for you to use Clobex lotion. They’ll recommend this based on how your condition responds to the drug and if you’re having any side effects.

It’s recommended that you don’t use more than 50 g (50 mL or 1.75 fluid ounces) of Clobex lotion each week.

Dosage of Clobex lotion for certain dermatoses

When used for certain dermatoses, such as eczema, Clobex lotion should always be used for the shortest amount of time that’s needed to improve the condition. (Dermatoses is a general term that describes skin conditions that can cause inflammation or itching.)

In general, Clobex treatment of dermatosis shouldn’t last longer than 2 weeks.

Dosage of Clobex lotion for plaque psoriasis

When used for plaque psoriasis, Clobex lotion should only be used for 2 weeks in a row when you first start treatment. However, your doctor may extend your treatment another 2 weeks if both of the following apply:

  • you have psoriasis lesions covering less than 10% of your body surface area (BSA), and
  • the condition hasn’t improved after the first 2 weeks of treatment

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss an application of Clobex, don’t apply extra Clobex the next time you apply the medication. Doing so could increase your risk of side effects from Clobex. Instead, just apply your next dose at the usual time. And be sure to always use Clobex exactly the way it was prescribed for you.

To help make sure that you don’t miss an application of Clobex, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Because Clobex is a strong steroid, it’s meant to be used as a short-term treatment. For typical lengths of treatment given the form of Clobex you’re using, see the dosage sections above.

In general, you’ll use Clobex intermittently for psoriasis flare-ups or other skin conditions that cause inflammation or itching. Talk with your doctor about the specific length of treatment that’s safe and effective for your condition.

It’s not known whether Clobex interacts with alcohol. But keep in mind that alcohol can worsen psoriasis, which Clobex is used to treat. And alcohol can even trigger psoriasis flare-ups.

In addition, alcohol can cause dehydration (low fluid level), inflammation, and problems absorbing important nutrients. And all of these situations can worsen certain skin conditions.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe to continue drinking while you’re using Clobex.

Clobex can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Clobex and other medications

Below, we describe medications that can interact with Clobex. This section doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with Clobex.

Before taking Clobex, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Clobex and other steroids

Clobex contains the drug clobetasol, which is a strong corticosteroid.

It’s important to tell your doctor if you’re taking any other corticosteroid medications, either by mouth or applied topically to your skin. And keep in mind that sometimes corticosteroids are found in medications that contain a combination of drugs.

Examples of corticosteroids include:

It’s recommended that you don’t use other corticosteroids while you’re using Clobex. This is because doing so could lead to increased side effects from the drugs.

Clobex and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Clobex. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Clobex.

Clobex and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Clobex. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Clobex, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Clobex can vary. To find current prices for Clobex shampoo (and other forms) in your area, check out GoodRx.com.

The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before approving coverage for Clobex. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Clobex, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Clobex, help is available.

Medicine Assistance Tool offers information on programs that can help lower the cost of your prescription. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, visit their website.

Generic version

Clobex is available in a generic form called clobetasol. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. The generic is considered to be as safe and effective as the original drug. And generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

To find out how the cost of clobetasol compares to the cost of Clobex, visit GoodRx.com. Again, the cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

If your doctor has prescribed Clobex and you’re interested in using clobetasol instead, talk with your doctor. They may have a preference for one version or the other. You’ll also need to check your insurance plan, as it may only cover one or the other.

Clobex is a corticosteroid that’s used to treat certain skin conditions. It’s not known exactly how Clobex works.

However, it’s thought that the drug stops inflammation and itching by blocking your body’s release of certain chemicals, including an essential fatty acid called arachidonic acid. When released, these chemicals become prostaglandins and leukotrienes, which help trigger inflammation. And this causes pain, itching, and swelling.

So by stopping these chemicals from being released, Clobex may help reduce pain, inflammation, and itching on your skin.

How long does it take to work?

How long Clobex takes to start working varies from person to person. It depends on the condition you’re using the drug to treat. And it depends on how severe your condition is.

Based on how quickly your condition improves with Clobex, your doctor will determine how long you should use this drug. This length of time is typically a couple of weeks. But be sure to only use Clobex for the length of time directed by your doctor.

It’s not known if Clobex is safe to use during pregnancy. This is because even though the drug is applied topically to your skin, your body can still absorb Clobex into your bloodstream. And it’s possible that the drug may then affect a developing fetus.

Clobex hasn’t been studied in pregnant women. However, in animal studies, clobetasol (the active drug in Clobex) did cause harm to fetuses exposed to it. But keep in mind that animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the safety of using Clobex. They may recommend a medication other than Clobex for you.

It’s not known if Clobex is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Clobex.

For more information about taking Clobex during pregnancy, see the section “Clobex and pregnancy” above.

It’s not known whether corticosteroids that are applied to your skin, such as Clobex, are safe to use while you’re breastfeeding. However, corticosteroids that are taken by mouth can pass into breast milk. And if this happens, they may be harmful to children who are breastfed.

Keep in mind that the amount of Clobex the body absorbs varies from person to person. And the amount your body absorbs affects how much of the drug passes into your breast milk.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about the safety of using Clobex. In some cases, your doctor may recommend a medication other than Clobex for you.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Clobex.

Is Clobex a steroid?

Yes. Clobex contains the active drug clobetasol, which is a corticosteroid.

Corticosteroids are drugs that work by inhibiting (stopping) the action of certain chemicals in your body. The chemicals affected by corticosteroids are ones that lead to inflammation, causing itching, swelling, and pain. So by working in this way, Clobex helps to treat certain skin conditions.

Will Clobex cure my condition?

Yes, depending on the condition that you have, Clobex may cure your condition.

For example, Clobex may cure certain skin conditions or rashes that respond to steroids. In this case, Clobex may completely clear up your skin.

However, it’s important to know that plaque psoriasis, which Clobex is also approved to treat, is a chronic (long-lasting) condition. Although Clobex can help clear up psoriasis lesions on your skin, it won’t cure psoriasis. This means that your psoriasis may come back again after it’s been cleared up with treatment.

If you have questions about what you can expect from Clobex treatment, talk with your doctor. They’ll let you know how Clobex will affect your skin condition.

Can I use my typical hair care products if I’m using Clobex shampoo?

Yes, possibly. While you’re using Clobex shampoo, you’ll lather the product in your hair, and then rinse your hair until all the shampoo is removed. You don’t need to use any other shampoo after you’ve used Clobex. But if you’d like to use a non-medicated shampoo after washing with Clobex, you can do so.

However, there’s no information from the manufacturer of Clobex that states whether it’s safe to use other hair products, such as hair spray or mousse.

If you’d like to use certain hair products while you’re using Clobex shampoo, talk with your doctor. They can recommend whether it’s safe for you to do so. But keep in mind that some products, including hairspray, may cause irritation on your scalp. And this could worsen your scalp psoriasis, which Clobex is being used to treat.

Will I be able to use sunscreen if I’m applying Clobex to my skin?

Yes. Typically, sunscreen can safely be used with topical medications, such as Clobex.

However, it’s important to talk with your doctor about whether it’s fine for you to apply sunscreen while you’re using Clobex. And ask your doctor about the order in which you should apply these products on your skin.

Does Clobex treat bacterial or fungal infections?

No, Clobex doesn’t treat bacterial or fungal infections. In fact, Clobex may actually increase the risk of infections. This is because the drug suppresses certain immune system cells that would normally fight off skin infections.

If you have a bacterial or fungal infection, it’s important to talk with your doctor. They can recommend if you need to use a medication that specifically treats infections. For example, they may advise that you use an antibacterial or antifungal cream.

For more information on how Clobex may cause new or worsening skin infections, see the section “Clobex side effects” above.

Does Clobex shampoo affect hair growth?

Yes, it can. In fact, hair loss (alopecia) is a known side effect of Clobex shampoo. But this side effect hasn’t been reported in people using Clobex lotion or Clobex spray.

However, Clobex shampoo has also been studied as a treatment to help improve hair growth for certain conditions, such as alopecia areata. (With this condition, your immune system attacks your hair follicles, leading to hair loss.)

For more information on how Clobex may be used to treat alopecia, see the section “Clobex uses” above.

If you have hair loss while you’re using Clobex, talk with your doctor. They may switch you to a different medication to help reduce this side effect.

Before taking Clobex, talk with your doctor about your health history. Clobex may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Hormone disorders. Clobex can cause certain hormone changes if too much of the drug is absorbed into your body. These changes may include Cushing’s syndrome and adrenal insufficiency. (These conditions affect your adrenal glands.) Clobex may also cause an increased blood sugar level and the onset of diabetes in people who already have the condition but aren’t aware of it. For more information about hormone changes caused by Clobex, see the section “Clobex side effects” above. And before starting Clobex, be sure to talk with your doctor if you have any hormone-related conditions.
  • Open wounds or planned surgeries. Before using Clobex, be sure to tell your doctor if you have any open cuts or wounds. Also let your doctor know if you have any planned surgeries. Clobex may affect how well your skin heals after it’s injured or operated on. Because of this, your doctor may have you wait to start using Clobex until your skin has fully healed.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Clobex or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Clobex. Instead, talk with your doctor about other medications that may be better options for you. And if you’re unsure about your medication allergies, talk with your doctor.
  • Pregnancy. Corticosteroids, such as Clobex, can be harmful if used during pregnancy. For more information, please see the section “Clobex and pregnancy” above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known whether Clobex is safe to use while breastfeeding. For more information, please see the section “Clobex and breastfeeding” above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Clobex, see the section “Clobex side effects” above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Clobex can lead to serious side effects. Do not use more Clobex than your doctor recommends.

Keep in mind that Clobex can be significantly absorbed through your skin. And in some cases, the drug may cause certain hormone changes. For more information about this, see the section “Clobex side effects” above.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

  • fever
  • shaking or having chills
  • headache
  • weakness
  • tiredness
  • vomiting or diarrhea

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve used too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Clobex from the pharmacy, the drug packaging will have an expiration date on it. Clobex should be safe to use until the expiration date that’s printed on the package. This is the case if the drug is stored under the right conditions.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that’s gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Clobex shampoo, lotion, and spray should be stored at room temperature (68°F to 77°F/20°C to 25°C). The drug should be kept in a tightly sealed container. Do not freeze, refrigerate, or heat Clobex products.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Clobex and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from being exposed to the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Clobex (clobetasol 0.05%) is approved to treat corticosteroid responsive dermatoses, as well as moderate to severe plaque psoriasis that affects the skin or scalp. For these uses, Clobex can be given to people ages 18 years and older.

Specifically, Clobex shampoo is approved to treat scalp psoriasis. Clobex lotion is approved to treat dermatosis, including plaque psoriasis. And Clobex spray is approved to treat plaque psoriasis in people with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis affecting up to 20% of their body surface area (BSA).

Limitations of Clobex use are as follows:

  • Shampoo. This form of Clobex should only be used topically on the scalp. It should not be used on the face, groin, or armpits. Contact should also be avoided with the eyes and lips. If contact with these areas does occur, they should be rinsed thoroughly with water.
  • Lotion and spray. These forms of Clobex should only be used topically on affected areas of skin. These forms should not be used on the face, groin, armpits, or areas of thinned skin. In addition, Clobex lotion and spray should not be used to treat rosacea or perioral dermatitis.

Administration

Administration of Clobex varies given the form of the drug used. Below, administration guidelines are described for each form of the medication.

Administration for Clobex shampoo

It is recommended that no more 50 g (50 mL or 1.75 fluid oz) of Clobex shampoo be used per week.

Clobex shampoo should be applied to dry hair and left in place for 15 minutes. The shampoo should then be rinsed away. A non-medicated shampoo may be used after Clobex has been rinsed away; however, it is not necessary to do so.

Administration for Clobex lotion

It is recommended that no more than 50 g (50 mL or 1.75 fluid oz) of Clobex lotion be used per week. Clobex lotion should be applied topically to affected areas.

Administration for Clobex spray

It is recommended that no more than the following amounts of Clobex spray be used:

  • 26 sprays per application
  • 52 sprays per day
  • 50 g (59 mL or 2 fluid oz) per week

Clobex spray should be applied topically to affected areas.

Mechanism of action

The mechanism of action of topical steroids, such as clobetasol, is not completely known. However, corticosteroids are thought to induce phospholipase A2, which is an inhibitory protein that mediates the synthesis of inflammatory mediators, such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes. This process also inhibits the release of arachidonic acid, the precursor of these inflammatory mediators.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Topical corticosteroids, such as clobetasol, have variable absorption and distribution following application. According to the manufacturer of Clobex, there is no human data evaluating the distribution or metabolism of topical corticosteroids.

Generally, once steroids are absorbed through the skin, they undergo the same metabolic processes as they would if systemically administered. Typical metabolism is through the liver, and excretion is primarily through the kidneys. Some steroids, as well as their metabolites, may be excreted through bile.

Contraindications

There are no contraindications to Clobex use.

Storage

Clobex shampoo, lotion, and spray should be stored at room temperature (68°F to 77°F/20°C to 25°C) in a tightly sealed container. Do not freeze, refrigerate, or heat these products.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.