Baqsimi is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to treat severe hypoglycemia in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar level is dangerously low. Baqsimi can be used in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

Baqsimi contains the active drug glucagon. Glucagon works with your liver to make glucose (sugar) quickly available to your body. This raises your blood sugar level.

Baqsimi comes as a nasal (nose) spray. It’s given as one spray into one nostril during an episode of severe hypoglycemia. The dose doesn’t have to be inhaled. Baqsimi is the only dry nasal spray available to treat severe hypoglycemia.

Emergency use

With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar level can get so low that you may need someone else’s help to treat it. You may need someone to give you a dose of Baqsimi. For this reason, you should make sure a family member, friend, caregiver, or co-worker knows how to recognize the signs of severe hypoglycemia. They should also know how to use Baqsimi.

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. You or someone else should call 911 or your local emergency phone number right after you take the first dose of Baqsimi.

Effectiveness

To learn about Baqsimi’s effectiveness, see the “Baqsimi for severe hypoglycemia” section.

Baqsimi is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Baqsimi contains the active drug ingredient glucagon.

The Baqsimi nasal device only contains one dose. The device can’t be reused.

For an episode of severe hypoglycemia, you may need more than one dose of Baqsimi. The drug is available in a package that contains two nasal spray devices (two doses). Talk with your doctor about the number of Baqsimi doses you should keep on hand.

You may wonder how long you can store your Baqsimi devices. Here’s some detail about Baqsimi’s shelf life, expiration, storage, and disposal.

Shelf life and expiration date

The shelf life of Baqsimi may be up to 18 months when stored under proper conditions. The shelf life of a drug is the amount of time it can safely be used.

Baqsimi should be kept in its shrink-wrapped packaging until you’re ready to use it. The shrink-wrap will keep the drug from being exposed to moisture. If Baqsimi is exposed to moisture, the drug may not work as well. (See the section below for more information on proper storage.)

The shelf life of Baqsimi may also depend on when the pharmacy received the drug and when you got it from the pharmacy. Talk with your pharmacist about how long your specific Baqsimi devices will be safe to use.

Baqsimi will also have an expiration date printed on its label. An expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Baqsimi can be stored at temperatures of up to 86°F (30°C). It should be kept in its shrink-wrapped packaging until you’re ready to use it. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Baqsimi should be kept in a place where you or your family, friends, or co-workers can easily access it during an episode of severe hypoglycemia. You may want to keep Baqsimi devices at home, at work, and at the home of family or friends.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Baqsimi and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Your doctor can recommend the number of Baqsimi doses you should keep on hand. To learn more about the shelf life and expiration date of Baqsimi, see the ”Baqsimi shelf life, expiration, storage, and disposal” section above.

Drug forms and strengths

Baqsimi comes as a nasal (nose) spray in a single-use device. Each Baqsimi device contains one 3-mg dose of the active drug glucagon.

A Baqsimi device can’t be reused. However, you can get Baqsimi as a package that contains two nasal spray devices (two doses). Talk with your doctor about the number of Baqsimi doses you should keep on hand.

Dosage for severe hypoglycemia

The recommended dose of Baqsimi for severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) is one spray (3 mg) into one nostril. The dose doesn’t have to be inhaled. If you don’t respond to the drug within 15 minutes, you can take another dose from a new Baqsimi device.

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. You or someone else should call 911 or your local emergency phone number right after you take the first dose of Baqsimi.

During an episode of severe hypoglycemia, you may need someone else to give you a dose of Baqsimi. Make sure that a family member, friend, caregiver, or co-worker knows how to recognize severe hypoglycemia and understands how to use Baqsimi.

Pediatric dosage

Baqsimi is approved to treat severe hypoglycemia in children ages 4 years and older. The dose of Baqsimi used for children is the same as the adult dose.

The recommended dose of Baqsimi for severe hypoglycemia is one spray (3 mg) into one nostril. The dose doesn’t have to be inhaled. If the child doesn’t respond to the drug within 15 minutes, another dose may be given from a new Baqsimi device.

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number right after you give a child the first dose of Baqsimi.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

No. Baqsimi isn’t meant to be used as a long-term treatment. It’s used in emergency situations to increase your blood sugar level.

Baqsimi can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Baqsimi. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Baqsimi, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs they have approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Baqsimi, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Baqsimi can include:*

  • itchy, red, or watery eyes
  • itchy throat
  • discomfort in your nose
  • itchy, runny, or stuffy nose (see “Side effect details” below)
  • headache (see “Side effect details” below)
  • nausea and vomiting (see “Side effect details” below)

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Baqsimi. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Baqsimi’s package instructions.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Baqsimi aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects, explained below in “Side effect details,” include:

Side effects in children

Baqsimi is approved for use in children with diabetes who are ages 4 years and older. The side effects of Baqsimi in children are similar to the side effects in adults. See the “Mild side effects” and “Serious side effects” sections above for more information on these side effects.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug.Here’s some detail on some of the side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Baqsimi. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing
  • low blood pressure

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Baqsimi. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Nausea and vomiting

Nausea and vomiting are two of the most common side effects of Baqsimi. In clinical studies:

  • 26.1% of adults taking Baqsimi experienced nausea
  • 15% of adults taking Baqsimi experienced vomiting

In the studies, it’s not known how often these side effects occurred in adults taking a form of glucagon that’s injected into the muscle.

If you experience nausea or vomiting after taking Baqsimi, you can ask your doctor about ways to relieve this side effect.

Headache

Some people taking Baqsimi may experience a headache. In clinical studies, 18.3% of adults taking Baqsimi experienced a headache. It’s not known how often headaches occurred in adults taking a form of glucagon that’s injected into the muscle.

If you get bothersome headaches after taking Baqsimi, talk with your doctor about ways to relieve this side effect.

Eye side effects

Baqsimi may cause itchy, red, or watery eyes. In clinical studies, 21.6% to 58.8% of adults taking Baqsimi experienced these side effects. It’s not known how often these side effects occurred in adults taking a form of glucagon that’s injected into the muscle.

You can talk with your doctor if Baqsimi causes any eye side effects that bother you.

Nasal side effects

Many people taking Baqsimi have nasal (nose) side effects. These side effects can include an itchy, runny, or stuffy nose. Nose bleeds and sneezing were also reported by adults in clinical studies.

These symptoms occurred in 19.6% to 42.5% of adults who took Baqsimi.

It’s not known how often these side effects occurred in adults taking a form of glucagon that’s injected into the muscle.

If you experience bothersome nasal side effects after taking Baqsimi, talk with your doctor.

Baqsimi is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar level is dangerously low. Baqsimi can be used in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

Hypoglycemia occurs if your blood sugar drops below a certain healthy level. For many people who have diabetes, a normal blood sugar level is above 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hypoglycemia can be a side effect of drugs used to treat diabetes. It can also occur if you are sick, increase your physical activity, or skip a meal.

With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar is so low that you may need someone else’s help to treat it. Therefore, you may need someone else to give you a dose of Baqsimi. Make sure a family member, friend, caregiver, or co-worker knows how to recognize severe hypoglycemia and understands how to use Baqsimi.

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. You or someone else should call 911 or your local emergency phone number right after you take the first dose of Baqsimi.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia can include:

  • loss of consciousness (not being able to respond to sound or touch)
  • seizures
  • trouble eating or drinking
  • shaking or sweating
  • confusion
  • lack of coordination

Talk with your doctor if you experience severe hypoglycemia. They can help you understand what caused it. They can also help you avoid another episode of low blood sugar.

Effectiveness for severe hypoglycemia

Baqsimi has been shown to be effective for treating severe hypoglycemia in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

Baqsimi has been studied in adults with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. In clinical studies:

  • 98.8% to 100% of adults who were given Baqsimi to treat an episode of severe hypoglycemia had their blood sugar raised to a normal level. This happened within 11.6 to 15.9 minutes after they were given the drug.
  • 100% of adults who had glucagon injected into their muscle to treat an episode of severe hypoglycemia had their blood sugar raised to a normal level. This happened within 9.9 to 12.1 minutes after receiving glucagon.

Baqsimi and children

Baqsimi has also been studied in children who are 4 to 17 years old and have type 1 diabetes. In one study:

  • 100% of children who were given Baqsimi to treat an episode of severe hypoglycemia had their blood sugar raised to a normal level. This happened within 10.8 to 14.2 minutes after receiving glucagon.
  • 100% of children who had glucagon injected into their muscle to treat an episode of severe hypoglycemia had their blood sugar raised to a normal level. This happened within 10.8 to 12.5 minutes after receiving glucagon.

Talk with your child’s doctor if you’re interested in giving them Baqsimi for episodes of severe hypoglycemia.

Other drugs are available that can treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar). Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Baqsimi, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Alternatives for severe hypoglycemia

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat severe hypoglycemia include:

  • Glucagon. This is the same as the active drug in Baqsimi. It’s available as different brand-name drugs in other forms. These include:
    • Glucagon Emergency Kit, which comes as a powder that’s mixed with liquid to form a solution. It’s given as an intramuscular injection (into your muscle).
    • GlucaGen, which comes as a powder that’s mixed with liquid to form a solution. It may be given as a subcutaneous injection (under the skin), an intravenous injection (into a vein), or an intramuscular injection.
    • Gvoke, which comes as a prefilled syringe for injection or an auto-injector. It’s given as a subcutaneous injection.

You may wonder how Baqsimi compares with other treatments used for similar purposes. Here we look at how Baqsimi and glucose are alike and different.

Ingredients

Baqsimi contains the drug glucagon.

Glucose is a type of sugar your body uses for energy. Glucagon and glucose are found naturally in your body, and both come as medications. If your blood sugar is too low, you may need to take a glucose or glucagon medication to raise your blood sugar level.

Uses

Baqsimi is FDA-approved to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people with diabetes. It can be used in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

Glucose is used to treat hypoglycemia. It’s available over the counter (without a prescription).

Glucose hasn’t been evaluated by the FDA for effectiveness and safety. Talk with your doctor about whether glucose is safe for you to take.

Drug forms and administration

Baqsimi comes as a nasal (nose) spray. It’s given as one spray into one nostril during a severe hypoglycemia emergency. The dose doesn’t have to be inhaled. You should teach someone else how to give you the drug in case you need help taking it during an episode of severe hypoglycemia.

Glucose comes as gels, liquids, powders, and tablets. Glucose is also available in foods or drinks that contain carbohydrates.

Side effects and risks

Baqsimi and glucose can cause different side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with either Baqsimi or glucose.

  • Can occur with Baqsimi:
    • discomfort in your nose
    • headache
    • itchy, red, or watery eyes
    • itchy, runny, or stuffy nose
    • itchy throat
    • nausea and vomiting
  • Can occur with glucose:

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with Baqsimi.

Effectiveness

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies.

Baqsimi is a brand-name prescription drug that’s approved to treat severe hypoglycemia. Clinical studies have found it to be effective for this use.

Glucose is a type of sugar your body uses for energy. It’s used to treat hypoglycemia and is available over the counter (without a prescription).

Glucose hasn’t been evaluated by the FDA for effectiveness and safety. Talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe for you to take.

Costs

Baqsimi is a brand-name drug. There are currently no generic forms of Baqsimi. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics. Glucose is available over the counter (without a prescription).

According to estimates on WellRx, Baqsimi costs significantly more than glucose tablets. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug (including other forms of glucose) depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

You should use Baqsimi according to your doctor or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Baqsimi comes as a nasal (nose) spray. It’s given as one spray into one nostril during an episode of severe hypoglycemia. The dose doesn’t have to be inhaled. Also, having a common cold with a stuffy nose won’t reduce the amount of Baqsimi that your body absorbs (takes in).

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. You or someone else should call 911 or your local emergency phone number right after you take the first dose of Baqsimi.

During an episode of severe hypoglycemia, you can either give yourself a dose of Baqsimi or, if needed, have someone else give you a dose. Make sure that a family member, friend, caregiver, or co-worker knows how to recognize severe hypoglycemia and understands how to use Baqsimi.

You can visit the manufacturer’s site for step-by-step instructions on how to use Baqsimi.

When to take

Baqsimi should be used during an episode of severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar). With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar is so low that you may need someone else’s help you treat it. Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. Call 911 right after you take the first dose of Baqsimi.

Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia can include:

  • loss of consciousness (not being able to respond to sound or touch)
  • seizures
  • trouble eating or drinking
  • shaking or sweating
  • confusion
  • lack of coordination

Talk with your doctor if you experience severe hypoglycemia. They can help you understand what caused it. They can also help you avoid another episode of low blood sugar.

Taking Baqsimi with food

You should eat fast-acting carbohydrates as soon as Baqsimi raises your blood sugar to a normal level. The American Diabetes Association recommends eating at least 15 g of carbohydrates within 15 minutes of experiencing hypoglycemia. (This is sometimes called the 15-15 rule.)

Examples of 15 g of fast-acting carbohydrates include:

  • 4 ounces of fruit juice
  • 4 ounces of regular (not diet) soda
  • glucose gel, liquid, powder, or tablets
  • hard candy (the candy’s label can tell you how many pieces equal 15 g)

There are no known interactions between alcohol and Baqsimi. However, alcohol can make it harder to manage your blood sugar levels. This is especially true if you drink alcohol without eating food.

Drinking alcohol can also prevent you from recognizing signs of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Not recognizing hypoglycemia early can lead to severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar).

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. Call 911 or your local emergency phone number if you experience severe hypoglycemia.

Baqsimi can interact with several other medications.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Baqsimi and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Baqsimi. This list doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with Baqsimi.

Before taking Baqsimi, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Baqsimi and warfarin

Baqsimi may increase the anti-blood-clotting effect of warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven). Using these drugs together could raise your risk of bleeding.

Talk with your doctor if you currently take warfarin. They may want to adjust your warfarin dosage if you’re also prescribed Baqsimi.

Baqsimi and beta-blockers

Beta-blockers are mainly used to treat high blood pressure and certain heart conditions, such as angina and irregular heart rhythms. Beta-blockers are also found in some eye drops for glaucoma (increased pressure in your eye).

People using beta-blockers who take a dose of Baqsimi may have a temporary increase in their heart rate and blood pressure.

Examples of beta-blockers include:

  • metoprolol (Lopressor, Toprol XL)
  • carvedilol (Coreg)
  • atenolol (Tenormin)
  • propranolol (Inderal, Innopran XL)

Talk with your doctor if you’re taking a beta-blocker and are interested in using Baqsimi.

Baqsimi and indomethacin

Baqsimi shouldn’t be used with indomethacin (Indocin). This is a prescription nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used to relieve inflammation (swelling), pain, and fever.

Baqsimi may not work effectively to raise blood sugar levels in people taking indomethacin. Taking these drugs together may even worsen hypoglycemia.

If you’re currently taking indomethacin, talk with your doctor about your treatment options before starting Baqsimi.

Baqsimi and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Baqsimi. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Baqsimi.

Baqsimi and foods

There aren’t any foods that have been specifically reported to interact with Baqsimi. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Baqsimi, talk with your doctor.

As with all medications, the cost of Baqsimi can vary.

The actual price you’ll pay depends your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before approving coverage for Baqsimi. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the request and let you and your doctor know if your plan will cover Baqsimi.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Baqsimi, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Baqsimi, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Eli Lilly and Company, the manufacturer of Baqsimi, offers a savings card that may help you pay less for Baqsimi. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 800-545-5979 or visit the program website.

Generic version

Baqsimi isn’t available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Baqsimi is used to treat severe hypoglycemia (very low blood sugar) in people with diabetes. It can be used in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

What happens with severe hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia occurs if your blood sugar level drops below a certain level. For many people who have diabetes, a normal blood sugar level is above 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL).

Hypoglycemia can be a side effect of drugs used to treat diabetes. It can also occur if you are sick, increase your physical activity, or skip a meal.

With severe hypoglycemia, your blood sugar is so low that you may need someone else’s help to treat it. Symptoms of severe hypoglycemia include:

  • loss of consciousness (not being able to respond to sound or touch)
  • seizures
  • trouble eating or drinking
  • shaking or sweating
  • confusion and lack of coordination

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. Call 911 or your local emergency number if you experience severe hypoglycemia.

According to the American Diabetes Association guidelines, it’s important for people with diabetes to check their blood sugar regularly. This can help you and your doctor manage your diet and medications to keep your blood sugar level in a healthy range. Talk with your doctor about what your target blood sugar level is and at what point you should use Baqsimi.

Also, talk with your doctor if you experience severe hypoglycemia. They can help you understand what caused it. They can also help you avoid another episode of low blood sugar.

What Baqsimi does

Baqsimi contains the drug glucagon. Glucagon works with your liver to make glucose (sugar) quickly available to your body. As more glucose becomes available to your body, your blood sugar level will rise. This relieves the symptoms of severe hypoglycemia.

How long does it take to work?

Baqsimi should begin working right away to raise your blood sugar level. It may take up to 15 minutes for your body to respond to the drug. If you aren’t awake and able to eat carbohydrates within 15 minutes, you can receive another dose from a new Baqsimi device.

It’s unknown whether Baqsimi is safe to use during pregnancy. This drug hasn’t been studied in pregnant women.

Clinical studies of other drugs containing glucagon haven’t shown any negative effects when used during pregnancy. If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking Baqsimi.

It’s not known if Baqsimi is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Baqsimi.

It’s not known if Baqsimi can pass into breast milk. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Baqsimi.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Baqsimi.

What types of carbs should I consume after taking Baqsimi?

You should eat fast-acting carbohydrates as soon as Baqsimi raises your blood sugar to a normal level. The American Diabetes Association recommends eating at least 15 g of carbohydrates within 15 minutes of experiencing hypoglycemia. (This is sometimes called the 15-15 rule.)

Examples of 15 g of fast-acting carbohydrates include:

  • 4 ounces of fruit juice
  • 4 ounces of regular (not diet) soda
  • glucose gel, liquid, powder, or tablets
  • hard candy (the candy’s label can tell you how many pieces equal 15 g)

When should I check my blood glucose after taking Baqsimi?

You should eat at least 15 g of fast-acting carbohydrates as soon as Baqsimi raises your blood sugar level. (See the question above for examples of fast-acting carbohydrates.)

After 15 minutes, check your blood sugar. If your blood sugar is still not above 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), eat another 15 g of carbohydrates.

Continue the cycle of eating carbohydrates and checking your blood sugar every 15 minutes until your blood sugar level is at least 70 mg/dL.

Severe hypoglycemia is a medical emergency and should be treated right away. You or someone else should call 911 or your local emergency phone number right after you take the first dose of Baqsimi.

Can I take a second dose of Baqsimi if needed?

Yes. If you don’t respond to one dose of Baqsimi within 15 minutes, you can take another dose from a new Baqsimi device. It’s important to use a new device because each Baqsimi device only contains one dose.

Talk with your doctor about the number of Baqsimi doses you should keep on hand.

Does Baqsimi prevent future episodes of hypoglycemia?

No. Baqsimi works to quickly raise your blood sugar as soon as you take it. It won’t prevent future episodes of hypoglycemia.

Talk with your doctor about ways to prevent future episodes of severe hypoglycemia.

When is it safe to use insulin after I take Baqsimi?

The type of insulin you use and your dosing schedule will determine when it’s safe to use insulin after you take Baqsimi. Talk with your doctor about when it’s safe to use insulin after taking Baqsimi. Your doctor can help determine what is causing your hypoglycemia and may adjust your insulin dosage as needed.

Should I call emergency medical services after taking Baqsimi?

Yes. You should call 911 or your local emergency phone number right away after using the first dose of Baqsimi.

During an episode of severe hypoglycemia, you may need someone else to give you a dose of Baqsimi. Make sure that whomever you’ve trained to help you knows to call for help after giving you Baqsimi.

Before taking Baqsimi, talk with your doctor about your health history. Baqsimi may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Low amounts of glycogen stored in the liver. Baqsimi won’t raise your blood sugar if your body doesn’t have enough glycogen (a form of sugar broken down from carbohydrates) stored in your liver and muscles. Your body may have low amounts of glycogen if you’ve gone a long period of time without eating. This can also occur if you have health conditions such as adrenal insufficiency or chronic hypoglycemia. Your doctor may recommend a different drug to treat severe hypoglycemia if you have low amounts of glycogen stored in your liver.
  • Insulinoma (tumor in the pancreas). Taking Baqsimi if you have insulinoma may cause your pancreas to release more insulin. This could cause your blood sugar to drop even lower. If you have a tumor in your pancreas, talk with your doctor about whether Baqsimi is safe for you to take.
  • Pheochromocytoma (tumor on the top of the kidney). If you have pheochromocytoma, using Baqsimi can raise your blood pressure. If you have this condition, talk with your doctor about whether Baqsimi is safe for you to take.
  • Pregnancy. Baqsimi hasn’t been studied in pregnant women.For more information, see the “Baqsimi and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Baqsimi can pass into the breast milk during breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Baqsimi and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Baqsimi, see the “Baqsimi side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Baqsimi can lead to serious side effects.

Do not use more Baqsimi than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Baqsimi is indicated for the treatment of severe hypoglycemia in people with diabetes. It’s approved for use in adults and in children ages 4 years and older.

Administration

Baqsimi is an intranasal device given into one nostril during a severe hypoglycemia emergency. The dose does not have to be inhaled. Administration is not affected by nasal congestion. The device is single-use and should not be used again after administration.

Mechanism of action

Glucagon is the active ingredient in Baqsimi. Glucagon increases concentrations of blood glucose by activating glucagon receptors on the liver. Activation of glucagon receptors stimulates the breakdown of stored glycogen, resulting in a release of glucose from the liver.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Baqsimi is absorbed intranasally and reaches peak concentrations within 15 minutes in both adults and children. Baqsimi is metabolized in the blood, kidneys, and liver. It’s half-life is between 21 to 31 minutes in children and 35 minutes in adults.

Contraindications

Baqsimi is contraindicated in people with insulinoma, pheochromocytoma, or a hypersensitivity to glucagon or any other ingredients in Baqsimi.

Storage

Baqsimi can be stored at temperatures of up to 86°F (30°C). Baqsimi should be kept in its shrink-wrapped packaging until it’s used. The shrink-wrap will keep the drug from being exposed to moisture. Exposure to moisture can decrease the drug’s shelf life and decrease its efficacy.

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