Cimzia is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s used to reduce inflammation (swelling) associated with several long-term conditions. Cimzia is FDA-approved in adults for these conditions:

  • Plaque psoriasis (the most common form of the skin condition psoriasis). Cimzia is used to treat moderate to severe plaque psoriasis that could benefit from systemic treatment (treatment that affects the whole body) or phototherapy (light treatment that treats or affects just the skin).
  • Crohn’s disease (a type of inflammatory bowel disease). Cimzia is used to lessen signs and symptoms of moderate to severe Crohn’s disease that’s active (causing symptoms). It’s used when other treatments haven’t helped enough.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis (a disease that causes joint swelling and damage). Cimzia is used to treat moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis that’s active.
  • Psoriatic arthritis (a type of joint swelling that can sometimes happen in people with psoriasis). Cimzia is used to treat psoriatic arthritis that’s active.
  • Ankylosing spondylitis (a kind of joint swelling that affects the spine). Cimzia is used to treat ankylosing spondylitis that’s active.
  • Non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (a type of joint swelling in the spine or pelvis that causes pain and stiffness but that can’t be seen on an X-ray). Cimzia is used to treat active non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis in people who have signs of inflammation in blood tests or MRI scans (pictures of the inside of your body using magnets and radio waves).

Cimzia is a biologic drug (a medication made using living cells). It’s a type of drug called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker.

Cimzia is given by subcutaneous injection (under the skin). The injection comes in two forms: as a single-dose vial and a single-dose prefilled syringe.

When you first start taking Cimzia, your doctor will give you the injections in their office. In some cases, they may also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe). Talk with your doctor if you’re interested in learning to do this.

Effectiveness

Several clinical studies have found Cimzia to be more effective than a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) at reducing symptoms of all these conditions.

  • For psoriasis: In three studies, after 16 weeks of treatment, 45% to 65% of people who took Cimzia had minimal psoriasis symptoms or saw their symptoms clear up. Of people who took a placebo, 3% to 4% saw these results.
  • For Crohn’s disease: In one study, after 26 weeks of treatment, 37% of people who took Cimzia had reduced symptoms, compared to 27% of people who took a placebo.
  • For rheumatoid arthritis: In one study, after 6 months of treatment, 59% of people who took Cimzia had their symptoms improved by at least 20%. Of the people who took placebo, 14% achieved this result.
  • For psoriatic arthritis: In one study, after 12 weeks of treatment, 52% to 58% of people who took Cimzia had their symptoms improved by at least 20%. Of the people who took placebo, 24% achieved this result.
  • For ankylosing spondylitis: In one study, after 12 weeks of treatment, 57% to 64% of people who took Cimzia had their symptoms improved by at least 20%. Of the people who took placebo, 37% achieved this result.
  • For non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis: In one study, after 52 weeks of treatment, 47% of people who took Cimzia had a major improvement in disease activity (improved symptoms and blood test results), compared with 7% of people who took a placebo.

For more information on effectiveness, see the “Cimzia uses” section below.

Cimzia is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Cimzia contains the active drug ingredient certolizumab pegol.

Cimzia can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Cimzia. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Cimzia, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs they have approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Cimzia, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

The mild side effects of Cimzia that are more common* can include:

The mild side effects of Cimzia that are less common** can include:

  • herpes infections (such as oral herpes, genital herpes, or chickenpox) in people with psoriasis who have been exposed to the herpes virus
  • headache in people with psoriasis or arthritis
  • high blood pressure in people with arthritis — this was seen those who already have high blood pressure and in those taking other medications that could also increase blood pressure
  • joint pain in people with Crohn’s disease
  • injection site reaction, such as redness, bruising, pain, or swelling (See “Side effect details” below)

* occurred in 8% or more of people in clinical studies

** occurred in less than 8% of people in clinical studies

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. If they’re more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Cimzia aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Heart failure. Symptoms can include:
    • shortness of breath
    • swollen ankles or feet
    • sudden weight gain
  • Blood disorders, such as low number of red or white blood cells or platelets. Symptoms can include:
    • fever
    • bruising or bleeding easily
    • skin or gums looking pale
  • Reactivation of the hepatitis B virus in people who carry this virus in their blood. Symptoms can include:
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • loss of appetite
    • abdominal (belly) pain
    • jaundice (yellowing of your skin and whites of your eyes)
  • Nerve problems, such as multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, seizures, optic neuritis (inflammation of the optic nerve), and peripheral neuropathy. Symptoms can include:
    • dizziness
    • problems with your vision
    • tingling
    • numbness
    • weakness in your arms or legs
  • Immune system reactions, such as lupus-like syndrome. Symptoms can include:
    • shortness of breath
    • joint pain
    • rash on the cheeks or arms that gets worse when exposed to the sun

Other serious side effects are explained below in “Side effect details.” These include:

* Cimzia has a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information, see “FDA warnings: Risk of serious infections and possible risk of cancer” at the beginning of this article.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on several of the side effects this drug may cause.

Risk of serious infections

Cimzia weakens your immune system and can make it less able to fight germs. This increases your risk for getting infections, some of which are serious or may become serious.

Serious infections include tuberculosis (TB), pneumonia, kidney infection, and bacterial, fungal, or viral infections that spread throughout your body. Serious infections may need to be treated in hospital and can sometimes lead to death. Your doctor will test you for TB before you start treatment with Cimzia.

See your doctor right away if you get any symptoms of infection while taking Cimzia. These may include:

  • fever
  • chills
  • a bad cough
  • coughing up blood
  • red, warm, or painful areas of skin
  • skin sores
  • urinating often, with a burning sensation when you urinate
  • muscle aches
  • shortness of breath
  • unexpected weight loss
  • fatigue (lack of energy)

If you get an infection while taking Cimzia, your doctor will prescribe medication to treat it. If you develop a serious infection, you may need to stop taking Cimzia until the infection has been successfully treated.

To help avoid infections:

  • wash your hands often, especially if you’ve been in public places
  • stay away from people who have infections (especially coughs, colds, or flu)
  • ask your doctor if there are any vaccines you should have before you start Cimzia

Possible risk of cancers

Cimzia weakens your immune system and can make it less able to attack and destroy cancer cells. Because of this, Cimzia may increase your risk for developing certain types of cancer. These include lymphoma, leukemia, and skin cancer.

Your doctor will monitor you closely throughout your Cimzia treatment by doing blood tests and skin examinations. See your doctor right away if you notice any changes in your skin while you’re taking Cimzia.

In clinical studies, a few cases of cancer were reported in people who took Cimzia. However, cancers occurred at a similar rate in people who took a placebo (a treatment with no active drug). Cimzia is a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker, and cancers have been reported in people taking other TNF blockers. In some cases, cancers occurred more frequently in people taking a TNF blocker than in people taking a placebo.

Lymphoma and other rare cancers have been reported in children and teenagers treated with TNF blockers. Some of these cancers have led to death. Cimzia should not be used in children under 18 years of age.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Cimzia. It’s not known how often this occurs. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Cimzia. Call 911 if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Note: Part of the single-dose prefilled syringe is made of a material similar to natural rubber latex. Handling the syringe could cause an allergic reaction if you are sensitive to latex. Warn your doctor if you have an allergy to latex.

Weight gain or weight loss (not a direct side effect)

Weight gain or weight loss was not specifically reported with Cimzia in clinical studies. However, weight changes can be signs of some of the more serious side effects associated with Cimzia.

For example, sudden weight gain can be caused by fluid retention, which is a symptom of heart failure. Cimzia can cause and worsen heart failure. See your doctor right away if you suddenly gain weight while using Cimzia, especially if you have other symptoms of heart failure. These include swollen feet and ankles and shortness of breath.

Weight loss can sometimes be a symptom of tuberculosis or liver problems, which are possible side effects of Cimzia. See your doctor right away if you have unexpected weight loss while taking Cimzia.

Tiredness

You may feel tired while using Cimzia. In clinical studies, fatigue (lack of energy) was reported in some people who took Cimzia.

In people with rheumatoid arthritis, fatigue was reported in 3% of people who took Cimzia with methotrexate. In comparison, fatigue was reported in 2% of people who took a placebo with methotrexate. Fatigue was reported in a similar percentage of people who took Cimzia for psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, or non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis.

Fatigue was not reported in clinical studies of Cimzia for people with Crohn’s disease or psoriasis.

If you feel unusually tired while taking Cimzia, talk with your doctor. They may have suggestions to help improve your energy levels. Feeling tired can also be a sign of anemia or liver problems, which can occur with Cimzia. Your doctor may want to do blood tests to check for these conditions.

Hair loss

In clinical studies, some people who took Cimzia experienced hair loss. It’s not known how often this occurred, but it was not common.

Talk with your doctor if you’re worried about hair loss while taking Cimzia.

Pain or reaction at your injection sites

Where Cimzia is injected, you may get some pain or a reaction such as redness, bruising, discoloration, or swelling.

In clinical studies of Cimzia for psoriasis, injection site reactions were reported in:

  • 3.2% of people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
  • 1.7% of people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
  • 0.6% of people who took a placebo

Injection site reactions were also reported in clinical studies of Cimzia for other conditions. It’s not known how often they occurred, but they were not common.

Each time you get a Cimzia injection, be sure to use an injection site that’s at least 1 inch away from the last site you used. See your doctor if you get a severe reaction after a Cimzia injection.

Liver damage

If you’ve ever had hepatitis B (liver infection), taking Cimzia can cause the hepatitis B virus to become active in your body again. This can result in liver damage and can sometimes lead to death. Your doctor will test you for hepatitis B before you start treatment with Cimzia. If you have the hepatitis B virus, your doctor will decide if Cimzia is right for you.

In clinical studies, raised liver enzymes (which can be a sign of liver damage and hepatitis) were also reported in some people who took Cimzia. It’s not known how often these problems occurred or if they were related to hepatitis B reactivation, but they were not common.

See your doctor right away if you get any symptoms of liver problems while taking Cimzia. These include:

  • pain on the right side of your abdomen (belly)
  • unusually dark urine or pale stools
  • fatigue
  • loss of appetite
  • vomiting
  • yellowing of your skin or the whites of your eyes

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Cimzia comes in two forms:

  • a single-dose vial containing 200 mg of Cimzia
  • a single-dose prefilled syringe containing 200 mg of Cimzia

Both forms of Cimzia are given by subcutaneous injection (injection under the skin) into the thigh or tummy.

When you first start taking Cimzia, your doctor will give you the injection in their office. In some cases, they may also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe). Talk with your doctor if you’re interested in learning to do this.

Dosage for plaque psoriasis

The usual dosage for adults is 400 mg (given as two injections of 200 mg) every 2 weeks.

However, if you weigh 198 pounds (90 kilograms) or less, you may start with 400 mg (two injections of 200 mg) given:

  • for your first dose
  • 2 weeks after your first dose
  • 4 weeks after your first dose

This would be followed by a dosage change to 200 mg (one injection) every other week.

Dosage for Crohn’s disease

The usual dosage for adults is 400 mg (two injections of 200 mg). This is given:

  • for your first dose
  • 2 weeks after your first dose
  • 4 weeks after your first dose

If your Crohn’s symptoms have improved at this point, your dosage will change to 400 mg (two injections of 200 mg) every 4 weeks.

Dosage for rheumatoid arthritis and psoriatic arthritis

The usual dosage for adults is 400 mg (two injections of 200 mg). This is given:

  • for your first dose
  • 2 weeks after your first dose
  • 4 weeks after your first dose

After this, the recommended dosage is 200 mg (one injection) every 2 weeks, or 400 mg (two injections of 200 mg) every 4 weeks.

Dosage for ankylosing spondylitis and non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis

The usual dosage for adults is 400 mg (two injections of 200 mg). This is given:

  • for your first dose
  • 2 weeks after your first dose
  • 4 weeks after your first dose

After this, the recommended dosage is 200 mg (one injection) every 2 weeks, or 400 mg (two injections) every 4 weeks.

What if I miss a dose?

It’s important to keep your appointments with your doctor for Cimzia injections. If you miss an appointment, call your doctor’s office right away to reschedule.

If you’re using Cimzia at home and forget to take a dose, take it as soon as you remember and then talk with your doctor. They can help you set up a new schedule for your Cimzia treatment.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, write your Cimzia schedule on your calendar. You can also try setting a reminder on your phone.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Cimzia is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Cimzia is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Cimzia to treat certain conditions. Cimzia may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Cimzia for plaque psoriasis

Cimzia is FDA-approved to treat plaque psoriasis in adults. It’s used for moderate to severe plaque psoriasis that could benefit from systemic treatment (medication taken as tablets or injections) or phototherapy (light treatment).

Plaque psoriasis is the most common type of the skin condition psoriasis. It’s an autoimmune disease (when your immune system mistakenly attacks healthy cells in your body). It causes red or silver plaques (thick, scaly patches) to develop on your skin. Cimzia helps reduce the number of psoriasis plaques and how severe they are.

Effectiveness for plaque psoriasis

In clinical studies, Cimzia was more effective than a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) at reducing symptoms of plaque psoriasis. After 16 weeks:

  • 45% to 65% of people who took Cimzia had minimal psoriasis symptoms or saw their symptoms clear up. Of those who took a placebo, 3% to 4% of people had the same result.
  • 65% to 82% of people who took Cimzia had at least a 75% improvement in their psoriasis symptoms. Of those who took a placebo, 4% to 13% had the same result.

Results were similar after 48 weeks of treatment.

Cimzia for Crohn’s disease

Cimzia is FDA-approved for Crohn’s disease in adults. It’s used to reduce symptoms in people who have moderate to severe Crohn’s disease that’s active (causing symptoms).

Crohn’s disease is a form of inflammatory bowel disease that causes symptoms such as diarrhea, blood in your stools, and abdominal (belly) cramps. Cimzia is used when other treatments haven’t helped enough.

Effectiveness for Crohn’s disease

In clinical studies, Cimzia was more effective than a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) at reducing symptoms of Crohn’s disease. In one study, after 26 weeks of treatment:

  • 37% of people who took Cimzia had reduced symptoms
  • 29% of people who took Cimzia were in remission (had few or no symptoms)
  • 27% of people who took a placebo had reduced symptoms
  • 18% of people who took a placebo were in remission

Cimzia for rheumatoid arthritis

Cimzia is FDA-approved to treat rheumatoid arthritis in adults. It’s used for moderate to severe rheumatoid arthritis that’s active (causing symptoms).

Rheumatoid arthritis is an autoimmune disease (when your immune system mistakenly attacks cells in your body). It causes joint swelling and damage, and it makes your joints stiff and painful.

Effectiveness for rheumatoid arthritis

In clinical studies, Cimzia was more effective than a placebo (a treatment containing no active drug) at improving rheumatoid arthritis symptoms. It was also more effective than a placebo at improving physical function (ability to do daily activities such as bathing, dressing, or walking). After 6 months:

  • symptoms improved by at least 20% in:
    • 59% of people who took Cimzia
    • 14% of people who took a placebo
  • symptoms improved by at least 50% in:
    • 37% of people who took Cimzia
    • 8% of people who took a placebo
  • symptoms improved by at least 70% in:
    • 21% of people who took Cimzia
    • 3% of people who took a placebo

Results were similar after 1 year of treatment.

In one of these studies, joint damage was also assessed with X-rays. After 52 weeks, 69% of people who took Cimzia didn’t have any further damage to their joints. Of the people who took a placebo, 52% didn’t have any further damage.

Cimzia for psoriatic arthritis

Cimzia is FDA-approved to treat psoriatic arthritis in adults. It’s used for psoriatic arthritis that’s active (causing symptoms). Psoriatic arthritis is a form of arthritis (joint swelling) that can happen in some people with psoriasis.

Effectiveness for psoriatic arthritis

In a clinical study, Cimzia was more effective than a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) at reducing symptoms of psoriatic arthritis. It was also more effective than a placebo at improving physical function (ability to do daily activities such as bathing, dressing, or walking). After 12 weeks:

  • symptoms improved by at least 20% in:
    • 58% of people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
    • 52% of people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 4 weeks
    • 24% of people who took a placebo
  • symptoms improved by at least 50% in:
    • 36% of people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
    • 33% of people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 4 weeks
    • 11% of people who took a placebo
  • symptoms improved by at least 70% in:
    • 25% of people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
    • 13% of people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 4 weeks
    • 3% of people who took a placebo

In one of these studies, the effect of Cimzia on joint damage was also assessed with X-rays. In people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks, joint damage did not progress as much as joint damage in people who took a placebo. However, this was not seen in people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 4 weeks.

Cimzia for ankylosing spondylitis

Cimzia is FDA-approved to treat ankylosing spondylitis in adults. It’s used for ankylosing spondylitis that’s active (causing symptoms). Ankylosing spondylitis is a form of arthritis (joint swelling) that affects the spine.

Effectiveness for ankylosing spondylitis

In one clinical study, Cimzia was more effective than a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) at reducing symptoms of ankylosing spondylitis. Cimzia was also more effective than a placebo at improving physical function (ability to do daily activities such as bathing, dressing, or walking). After 12 weeks:

  • symptoms improved by at least 20% in:
    • 57% of people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
    • 64% of people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 4 weeks
    • 37% of people who took a placebo
  • symptoms improved by at least 40% in:
    • 40% of people who took 200 mg of Cimzia every 2 weeks
    • 50% of people who took 400 mg of Cimzia every 4 weeks
    • 19% of people who took a placebo

Cimzia for non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis

Cimzia is FDA-approved to treat non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis in adults. This is a kind of joint inflammation (swelling) in the spine or pelvis that causes pain and stiffness but can’t be seen on an X-ray. Cimzia is used for non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis that’s active (causing symptoms) in people who have signs of inflammation in blood tests or MRI scans.

Effectiveness for non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis

In one clinical study, Cimzia was more effective than a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) at improving symptoms and reducing disease activity. Disease activity is assessed using the results of blood tests and by asking people to rate their symptoms (for example, how severe their back pain is).

After 12 weeks:

  • symptoms improved by at least 40% in:
    • 48% of people who took Cimzia
    • 11% of people who took a placebo

After 1 year:

  • symptoms improved by at least 40% in:
    • 57% of people who took Cimzia
    • 16% of people who took a placebo
  • a major improvement in disease activity was seen in:
    • 47% of people who took Cimzia
    • 7% of people who took a placebo

Off-label uses for Cimzia

In addition to the uses listed above, Cimzia may be used off-label. Off-label drug use is when a drug that’s approved for one use is used for a different one that’s not approved.

Cimzia for ulcerative colitis (off-label use)

Ulcerative colitis is a type of inflammatory bowel disease that’s similar to Crohn’s disease. Cimzia is FDA-approved to treat Crohn’s disease, but it’s not FDA-approved to treat ulcerative colitis.

Cimzia is a type of drug called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker, and other TNF blockers are approved to treat ulcerative colitis.

The manufacturer of Cimzia is currently testing this drug as a treatment for moderate to severe ulcerative colitis in adults.

Talk with your doctor if you’re interested in taking Cimzia to treat ulcerative colitis.

Cimzia for uveitis (off-label use)

Uveitis is a type of eye inflammation (swelling). Cimzia is not FDA-approved to treat uveitis, but it may be used off-label for this purpose.

Cimzia is a type of drug called a TNF blocker, and other TNF blockers are approved to treat uveitis.

In one study, Cimzia was found to be effective for treating uveitis, including in people who had tried other TNF blockers without success.

Some people have uveitis along with inflammatory bowel disease, arthritis, or psoriasis. One review of studies found that Cimzia can be effective for treating uveitis and these other conditions at the same time.

Talk with your doctor if you’re interested in taking Cimzia to treat uveitis.

Cimzia may be used with other drugs to treat rheumatoid arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, plaque psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, spondyloarthritis, or Crohn’s disease. Your doctor will let you know if you need to take other drugs with Cimzia to treat your condition.

Other drugs that you might take with Cimzia include:

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Cimzia, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for plaque psoriasis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat plaque psoriasis include:

Alternatives for Crohn’s disease

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat Crohn’s disease include:

  • corticosteroids, such as prednisone (Rayos) or budesonide (Entocort EC)
  • sulfasalazine (Azulfidine)
  • azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran)
  • 6-mercaptopurine (Purinethol, Purixan)
  • methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall)
  • adalimumab (Humira)
  • infliximab (Remicade)
  • natalizumab (Tysabri)
  • vedolizumab (Entyvio)
  • ustekinumab (Stelara)

Alternatives for rheumatoid arthritis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat rheumatoid arthritis include:

  • nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or naproxen (Naprosyn)
  • corticosteroids, such as prednisone (Rayos)
  • methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall)
  • sulfasalazine (Azulfidine)
  • azathioprine (Azasan, Imuran)
  • hydroxychloroquine (Plaquenil)
  • leflunomide (Arava)
  • etanercept (Enbrel)
  • golimumab (Simponi)
  • adalimumab (Humira)
  • infliximab (Remicade)
  • anakinra (Kineret)
  • abatacept (Orencia)
  • rituximab (Rituxan)
  • tofacitinib (Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR)
  • tocilizumab (Actemra)

Alternatives for psoriatic arthritis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat psoriatic arthritis include:

  • NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or naproxen (Naprosyn)
  • methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall)
  • sulfasalazine (Azulfidine)
  • apremilast (Otezla)
  • leflunomide (Arava)
  • etanercept (Enbrel)
  • adalimumab (Humira)
  • infliximab (Remicade)
  • golimumab (Simponi)
  • ixekizumab (Taltz)
  • secukinumab (Cosentyx)
  • ustekinumab (Stelara)
  • brodalumab (Siliq)
  • abatacept (Orencia)
  • tofacitinib (Xeljanz, Xeljanz XR)

Alternatives for ankylosing spondylitis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat ankylosing spondylitis include:

  • NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or naproxen (Naprosyn)
  • corticosteroids, such as prednisone (Rayos)
  • methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall)
  • sulfasalazine (Azulfidine)
  • etanercept (Enbrel)
  • adalimumab (Humira)
  • infliximab (Remicade)
  • golimumab (Simponi)
  • secukinumab (Cosentyx)

Alternatives for non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis include:

  • NSAIDs, such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin IB) or naproxen (Naprosyn)
  • corticosteroids, such as prednisone (Rayos)
  • methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall)
  • sulfasalazine (Azulfidine)
  • etanercept (Enbrel)
  • adalimumab (Humira)
  • infliximab (Remicade)
  • golimumab (Simponi)
  • secukinumab (Cosentyx)

You may wonder how Cimzia compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Cimzia and Humira are alike and different.

Ingredients

Cimzia contains the active drug certolizumab. Humira contains the active drug adalimumab. Both Cimzia and Humira are biologics (drugs that are made using living cells). They both belong to a class of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Uses

Cimzia and Humira are both FDA-approved to treat or reduce signs and symptoms of:

Cimzia is also FDA-approved to treat:

  • non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (a type of joint swelling in the spine or pelvis)

Humira is also FDA-approved to treat:

  • moderate to severe Crohn’s disease in children ages 6 years and older
  • moderate to severe ulcerative colitis in adults
  • some types of noninfectious uveitis (a type of eye swelling) in adults and children ages 2 years and older
  • juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children ages 2 years and older
  • hidradenitis suppurativa (a chronic skin condition) in adults and children ages 12 years and older

Drug forms and administration

Cimzia comes as a single-dose vial and a single-dose prefilled syringe. Humira comes as a single-dose injection pen, a single-dose prefilled syringe, and a single-dose vial.

Cimzia and Humira are both given by subcutaneous injection (injection under the skin) into the thigh or tummy.

When you first start taking either Cimzia or Humira, your doctor will give you the injection at their office. In some cases, they may also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe). Talk with your doctor if you’re interested in learning to do this.

Side effects and risks

Cimzia and Humira are both TNF blockers. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

This list contains examples of more common side effects that can occur with both Cimzia and Humira (when taken individually):

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with both Cimzia and Humira (when taken individually):

* Cimzia and Humira both have a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information, see “FDA warnings: Risk of serious infections and possible risk of cancer” at the beginning of this article.

Effectiveness

Cimzia and Humira have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to treat the conditions listed below.

  • Plaque psoriasis: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Humira for treating plaque psoriasis has been compared in a review of several studies. This review found that Cimzia may be more effective than Humira for treating plaque psoriasis.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Humira for treating rheumatoid arthritis has been directly compared in a clinical study. The study found these drugs to be similarly effective for treating rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Ankylosing spondylitis: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Humira for treating ankylosing spondylitis has been compared in a review of studies. This review found Humira and Cimzia are likely to be similarly effective for treating ankylosing spondylitis.
  • Crohn’s disease: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Humira for treating Crohn’s disease has been compared in a review of several studies. This review found that Humira may be more effective than Cimzia for treating Crohn’s disease.
  • Psoriatic arthritis: These drugs haven’t been directly compared for psoriatic arthritis, but studies have found both Cimzia and Humira to be effective for this condition.

Costs

Cimzia and Humira are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

To find current prices for Cimzia and Humira, check out WellRx.com. Your cost for either drug may depend on the condition you’re using it to treat and your dosage. The actual price you’ll pay for Cimzia or Humira depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Cimzia and Enbrel are prescribed for similar uses. Below are details of how these medications are alike and different.

Ingredients

Cimzia contains the active drug certolizumab. Enbrel contains the active drug etanercept. These are both biologics (drugs made using living cells). Cimzia and Enbrel both belong to a class of drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Uses

Cimzia and Enbrel are both FDA-approved to treat:

Cimzia is also FDA-approved to treat:

  • moderate to severe Crohn’s disease in adults, when other treatments haven’t helped enough
  • non-radiographic axial spondyloarthritis (a form of joint swelling in the spine or pelvis)

Enbrel is also FDA-approved to treat:

  • plaque psoriasis in children ages 4 years and older who could benefit from systemic treatment (medication taken as tablets or injections) or phototherapy
  • polyarticular juvenile idiopathic arthritis in children ages 2 years and older

Drug forms and administration

Cimzia comes as a single-dose vial and a single-dose prefilled syringe. Enbrel comes as single-dose prefilled syringe, a single-dose prefilled autoinjector, and a single-dose prefilled cartridge to use in the reusable autoinjector. It also comes as a single-dose vial.

Cimzia and Enbrel are both given by subcutaneous injection (injection under the skin) into the thigh or tummy. Enbrel can also be given into the upper arm.

When you first start using either Cimzia or Enbrel, your doctor will give you the injection at their office. In some cases, they may also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe). Talk with your doctor if you’re interested in learning to do this.

Side effects and risks

Cimzia and Enbrel are both TNF blockers. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects. Below are examples of these side effects.

More common side effects

These lists contain examples of more common side effects that can occur with Cimzia or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with both Cimzia and Enbrel (when taken individually):

* Cimzia and Enbrel both have a boxed warning for this side effect. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). For more information, see “FDA warnings: Risk of serious infections and possible risk of cancer” at the beginning of this article.

Effectiveness

Cimzia and Enbrel have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to treat the conditions listed below.

  • Plaque psoriasis: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Enbrel for treating plaque psoriasis has been compared in a review of several studies. This review found that Cimzia may be more effective than Enbrel for treating plaque psoriasis.
  • Rheumatoid arthritis: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Enbrel for treating rheumatoid arthritis has been compared in review of studies. This review found Enbrel may be more effective than Cimzia for treating rheumatoid arthritis.
  • Ankylosing spondylitis: The effectiveness of Cimzia and Enbrel for treating ankylosing spondylitis has been compared in a review of studies. This review found Enbrel and Cimzia are likely to be similarly effective for treating ankylosing spondylitis.
  • Psoriatic arthritis: These drugs haven’t been directly compared for psoriatic arthritis, but studies have found both Cimzia and Enbrel to be effective for treating this condition.

Costs

Cimzia and Enbrel are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on WellRx.com, Cimzia generally costs less than Enbrel. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

There is not enough information available to know if Cimzia is safe to use during pregnancy. If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the possible risks and benefits of taking Cimzia.

If you decide to use Cimzia while pregnant, you’re encouraged to join the pregnancy registry for Cimzia. The registry collects health information from pregnant women who take Cimzia during their pregnancy. It also collects information about the health of babies born to these women.

This information will help show whether Cimzia has any unwanted effects when used during pregnancy. It will help other people to make informed decisions about using Cimzia during pregnancy in the future. To find out more, call the MotherToBaby Pregnancy Studies at 877-311-8972, or visit the program website.

It’s not known if Cimzia is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Cimzia.

Cimzia may pass into breast milk in tiny amounts. In small studies, no serious side effects were reported in breastfed children whose mothers took Cimzia. It’s not known if Cimzia affects how your body makes breast milk.

Talk with your doctor about the best way to feed your child while taking Cimzia.

You should take Cimzia according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

When you first start using Cimzia, your doctor will give you the injection at their office. They can also teach you how to give yourself injections at home (using the prefilled syringe) if you’d like to start doing it yourself.

Cimzia is given by subcutaneous injection (injection under the skin). The injection sites used are the thigh or tummy. You may need one or two injections for each dose. If you need two injections, they should be given in different places (at least 1 inch apart) at these injection sites.

The manufacturer of Cimzia has produced a video series of instructions on how to give yourself Cimzia injections. They also provide written step-by-step instructions as a booklet you can download.

When to take

Cimzia is usually taken once every 2 weeks or once every 4 weeks. Always follow your doctor’s instructions. You can take your dose at any time of day on your scheduled day.

To help make sure you don’t miss a dose, make sure your schedule is written on your calendar. You can also try setting a reminder in your phone.

There aren’t any known interactions between Cimzia and alcohol. However, drinking alcohol can worsen symptoms of psoriasis and Crohn’s disease for some people. The relationship between alcohol and arthritic diseases is not clear.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink while you’re using Cimzia.

Cimzia can interact with several other medications. Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Cimzia can also affect certain lab test results.

Cimzia and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Cimzia. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Cimzia.

Before taking Cimzia, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Cimzia and immunosuppressant drugs

Immunosuppressants are drugs that weaken your immune system. Cimzia can also weaken your immune system. Taking Cimzia with an immunosuppressant can raise your risk for getting infections.

Examples of immunosuppressant drugs that can raise the risk of infections with Cimzia include:

  • corticosteroids such as prednisone (Rayos)
  • methotrexate (Otrexup, Rasuvo, Trexall)

Cimzia and certain other biologics

Cimzia is a biologic (a drug made from living cells). Cimzia is not recommended with other biologics used to treat arthritis, Crohn’s disease, or psoriasis because it raises your risk for serious infections.

Examples of other biologics that are not recommended for use with Cimzia include:

  • abatacept (Orencia)
  • anakinra (Kineret)
  • natalizumab (Tysabri)
  • rituximab (Rituxan)

Cimzia and live vaccines

Getting a live vaccine while using Cimzia can cause serious infections.

Live vaccines contain weakened forms of viruses or bacteria. They don’t cause infections in people with healthy immune systems. However, they could cause infections if your immune system is weakened by taking Cimzia.

While you’re taking Cimzia, you shouldn’t get live vaccines such as:

It’s safe to get inactive (not live) vaccines, such as the flu shot, while you’re using Cimzia.

Cimzia and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Cimzia. However, you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Cimzia.

Cimzia and lab tests

Cimzia doesn’t affect blood clotting in your body. However, Cimzia may affect the results of certain tests that measure how long it takes your blood to clot. One of these tests is the activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) test. In most cases, you’ll only need this type of test done if your doctor thinks you may have a blood-clotting problem.

These abnormal test results may suggest that you have a problem with your blood clotting, when in fact you don’t. If you need to have a test done to check how your blood clots, make sure your doctor knows you’re taking Cimzia.

Cimzia is approved to treat Crohn’s disease, psoriasis, rheumatoid arthritis, psoriatic arthritis, ankylosing spondylitis, and non-radiographic spondyloarthritis. These conditions are all partly caused by an overactive immune system.

Your immune system normally protects you from infections and cancers. However, if your immune system is overactive, it produces too many proteins that cause inflammation (swelling). Inflammation is a key feature in all the conditions Cimzia treats. Inflammation causes the symptoms of these diseases, such as diarrhea and abdominal (belly) pain with Crohn’s disease, joint pain and stiffness with arthritis, and skin plaques (thick, scaly patches) with psoriasis.

Cimzia is a biologic therapy that works by reducing inflammation. Biologics are drugs that are made using living cells. They’re designed to target specific proteins in your body. Cimzia is a type of biologic called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker. TNF is a protein that causes inflammation, and it’s produced in excessive amounts in these diseases.

Cimzia works by attaching to TNF and blocking its effects. This reduces joint inflammation in arthritis, bowel inflammation in Crohn’s disease, and skin plaques in psoriasis.

How long does it take to work?

Cimzia starts to work as soon as you have your first injection. However, it may take a few weeks before you notice an improvement in your symptoms.

In clinical studies, about two-thirds of people taking Cimzia for Crohn’s disease had improved symptoms after 6 weeks of treatment. Almost half of those with ankylosing spondylitis and about 20% of those with arthritis had improved symptoms in the first 2 weeks of treatment. However, for most people it may take about 12 weeks before symptoms improve.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Cimzia.

Is Cimzia a steroid?

No, Cimzia is not a steroid. Steroids (also called corticosteroids) are drugs that reduce inflammation (swelling) in your body. Cimzia also reduces inflammation, but it works in a different way than steroids. Cimzia is a type of drug called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker.

Can I get a flu shot while I’m taking Cimzia?

Yes you can, and it’s important that you do. Cimzia weakens your immune system and makes it harder to fight infections such as the flu. Flu infections can be much more serious in people who take drugs like Cimzia. A flu vaccine is the best way to avoid getting the flu.

The flu vaccine comes in two forms: an injected vaccine (the flu shot) and a nasal spray vaccine. If you’re taking Cimzia, you should get the injected form of the flu vaccine. This contains flu virus that has been inactivated, which means it is not “live” and so can’t cause the flu.

You shouldn’t get the nasal form of the vaccine while you’re taking Cimzia. The nasal vaccine contains live strains of the flu virus. The virus has been weakened, and it won’t cause the flu in healthy people. However, it’s possible that it could cause the flu in people who have a weakened immune system.

While you’re taking Cimzia, you should get a flu shot every year to protect against flu.

Is it safe to take antibiotics while I’m using Cimzia?

Yes. Antibiotics are used to treat bacterial infections. If you get a bacterial infection while taking Cimzia, you’ll need to take an antibiotic to treat it. Cimzia weakens your immune system, so you’re less able to fight infections while you’re taking it. If you get a serious infection, you may need to stop taking Cimzia until the antibiotic clears up the infection.

Can I take Cimzia if I have diabetes?

Yes, but you may be more at risk of getting infections. Both diabetes and Cimzia can raise your risk for getting infections. To help avoid infections:

  • make sure all your immunizations are up to date before you start Cimzia
  • get the flu shot every year
  • if possible, stay away from people who have an infection
  • wash your hands often
  • practice good foot care to avoid foot ulcers and infections

See your doctor right away if you get any symptoms of an infection while you’re taking Cimzia.

Will Cimzia cure my condition?

No. Cimzia can’t cure your condition, but it can help relieve your symptoms. If you have Crohn’s disease or psoriasis, taking Cimzia may clear up your symptoms completely (called remission). But you must continue to take your medication to keep these results. So long-term treatment with Cimzia controls your condition, rather than cures it.

Is Cimzia a biologic?

Yes, Cimzia is a biologic. Biologics are drugs made using living cells. Cimzia is a type of biologic called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker.

As with all medications, the cost of Cimzia can vary. To find current prices for Cimzia in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Your insurance plan may require you to get prior authorization before approving coverage for Cimzia. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug.

The insurance company will review the request and let you and your doctor know if your plan will cover Cimzia.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Cimzia, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Cimzia, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

United BioSource LLC, the manufacturer of Cimzia, offers a program called CIMplicity. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, ask your doctor, call 844-277-6853, or visit the program website.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warnings. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Risk of serious infections

Cimzia makes your immune system less able to fight germs and raises your risk for developing serious infections. These include tuberculosis (TB) and bacterial, fungal, or viral infections that spread throughout the body. Serious infections may need to be treated in hospital and can sometimes lead to death. If you get a serious infection, you may need to stop taking Cimzia.

Your doctor will test you for TB before you start taking Cimzia. They will also check for any other infections you may have. Tell your doctor if you think you have an infection, you get a lot of infections, or you get infections that keep coming back. If you have an infection, it may need to be treated before you can start Cimzia. See your doctor right away if you get any symptoms of an infection while you’re taking Cimzia. See “Cimzia side effects” for more information.

Possible risk of cancer

Cimzia may increase the risk of developing certain types of cancer. These include lymphoma, leukemia, and skin cancer. Your doctor will monitor you closely throughout your Cimzia treatment by doing blood tests and skin examinations. See your doctor right away if you notice any changes in your skin while you’re taking Cimzia. Lymphoma and other rare cancers have been reported in children and teenagers treated with drugs called tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blockers. Some of these cancers have led to death. Cimzia is a TNF blocker. It should not be used in children under 18 years of age. See “Cimzia side effects” for more information.

Other precautions

Before taking Cimzia, talk with your doctor about your health history. Cimzia may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • History of hepatitis B infection. If you’ve ever had hepatitis B, there’s a chance that taking Cimzia could make the hepatitis B virus active in your body again. This could lead to liver failure and death. Your doctor will do blood tests to check for the hepatitis B virus before you start taking Cimzia. If you have the hepatitis B virus, your doctor will decide if Cimzia is right for you.
  • Heart failure. Cimzia can cause and worsen heart failure. If you have heart failure, your doctor will monitor you closely while you take Cimzia.
  • Nerve problems, such as multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barré syndrome, seizures, optic neuritis, or peripheral neuropathy. Cimzia can cause and worsen symptoms of these nerve problems. If you have a problem with your nerves, talk with your doctor about whether Cimzia is right for you.
  • Problems with your blood cell counts. In rare cases, Cimzia may lower your number of blood cells. If you’ve ever had problems with your blood cells, your doctor will closely monitor your blood cell counts while you take Cimzia.
  • Allergy to Cimzia or other TNF blockers. Don’t take Cimzia if you’ve had an allergic reaction to it before, or if you’re allergic to any of its ingredients. Cimzia is a type of drug called a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) blocker. If you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to another TNF blocker (such as Humira or Remicade), you doctor will decide if Cimzia is right for you.
  • Sensitivity to latex. You shouldn’t use the Cimzia prefilled syringe if you’re sensitive to latex. The cap of the prefilled syringe contains a natural rubber latex. This could cause an allergic reaction.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Cimzia is safe to use during pregnancy. Talk to your doctor before starting Cimzia if you are or could get pregnant. For more information, see the “Cimzia and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s unknown if it’s safe to use Cimzia while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Cimzia and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Cimzia, see the “Cimzia side effects” section above.

Do not use more of Cimzia than your doctor recommends.

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

Cimzia vials and prefilled syringes will have an expiration date printed on the label. The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Cimzia vials and prefilled syringes should be stored in a refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Keep them in their carton to protect them from light. Do not freeze Cimzia.

You can keep Cimzia prefilled syringes at room temperature (up to 77°F/25°C) for up to 7 days if needed. This might be helpful if you’re traveling and need to take your Cimzia dose while you’re away. Be sure to keep the syringes in their carton to protect them from light.

If necessary, unopened Cimzia vials can be kept at room temperature (up to 77°F/25°C) for up to 6 months.

If Cimzia vials or prefilled syringes have been stored at room temperature, do not put them back in the refrigerator.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Cimzia and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

The FDA website provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Cimzia is approved to treat the following conditions in adults:

Mechanism of action

Cimzia contains certolizumab pegol, a tumor necrosis factor (TNF) alfa blocker. It binds to and inactivates the inflammatory cytokine, TNF alfa.

High levels of TNF alfa are evident in the bowel wall of people with Crohn’s disease, as well as in the synovial fluid in the joints of people with rheumatoid arthritis. TNF alfa also plays a role in psoriasis, psoriatic arthritis, and ankylosing spondylitis.

Certolizumab pegol blocks the effects of high TNF alfa levels in these conditions, thereby reducing inflammation and associated symptoms.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

After subcutaneous injection, certolizumab pegol is approximately 80% bioavailable, and peak plasma concentrations are reached after 54 to 171 hours. The half-life of certolizumab pegol is about 14 days.

Contraindications

Do not use Cimzia in people allergic to certolizumab pegol or any of the excipients of Cimzia. For the Cimzia prefilled syringe, this includes latex.

Storage

Store Cimzia vials and prefilled syringes in a refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C). Keep them in their carton to protect them from light. Do not freeze Cimzia.

Cimzia prefilled syringes can be kept at room temperature up to a maximum of 77°F (25°C), for up to 7 days if needed. Unopened Cimzia vials can be kept at room temperature up to a maximum of 77°F (25°C) for up to 6 months.

If Cimzia vials or prefilled syringes have been stored at room temperature, do not put them back in the refrigerator.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.