Diacomit is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in adults and children. Specifically, it’s approved for use in people ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kilograms (kg), which is about 15 pounds (lb). For this use, Diacomit is prescribed in combination with the drug clobazam (Onfi, Sympazan).

Dravet syndrome is a rare form of epilepsy that typically starts in the first year of life. The condition causes frequent seizures that can be prolonged and severe.

It isn’t known if Diacomit can be used alone to treat Dravet syndrome. See the “Diacomit uses” section below for more details.

Drug details

Diacomit contains the active drug stiripentol. It’s a type of anti-seizure medication, also called an antiepileptic drug or anticonvulsant.

Diacomit is an oral drug that comes in two forms:

  • capsules
  • packets of powder you’ll mix in water to make a liquid suspension

Diacomit comes in two strengths: 250 milligrams (mg) and 500 mg.

FDA approval

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) first approved Diacomit in August 2018. The drug was initially approved for use in combination with the drug clobazam (Onfi, Sympazan) to treat seizures in adults and in children ages 2 years and older with Dravet syndrome.

In July 2022, the FDA’s approval of the drug was extended to younger children with Dravet syndrome. Now, Diacomit is approved for use in combination with clobazam to treat seizures in people ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kg. (A body weight of 7 kg is about 15 lb.)

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Diacomit, see the “Diacomit uses” section below.

The active ingredient in Diacomit is stiripentol. Diacomit is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

As with all medications, the cost of Diacomit can vary. To find current prices for Diacomit capsules or powder in your area, check out WellRx.com.

The cost you find on WellRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan and your location.

Biocodex, Diacomit’s manufacturer, has partnered with a specialty pharmacy to dispense this medication. This specialty pharmacy will ship the drug to your home. Diacomit isn’t currently available at other pharmacies. For more information, call the specialty pharmacy team at 833-248-0467. You can also view this website.

Before approving coverage for Diacomit, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered. If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Diacomit, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Diacomit, or if you need help understanding your insurance or Medicare coverage, help is available.

Diacomit has four access programs:

  • Quick Start Program
  • Bridge Program
  • Copay Program
  • Long-term Patient Assistance Program

For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 833-248-0467, or visit the Diacomit website.

To learn more about saving money on prescriptions, check out this article.

Generic version

The active ingredient in Diacomit is stiripentol. Diacomit is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Diacomit can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Diacomit. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Diacomit, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to manage any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Diacomit, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Diacomit can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days to a couple of weeks. However, if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Diacomit. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Diacomit’s prescribing information.
† To learn more about this side effect, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Diacomit aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

  • Neutropenia (low level of neutrophils, a type of white blood cell). Symptoms can include:
    • infection
    • fever
  • Thrombocytopenia (low level of platelets in the blood). Symptoms can include:
    • bruising easily
    • continued bleeding from cuts
    • nosebleeds
    • fatigue
  • Excessive sleepiness, which may make it dangerous to drive or operate machinery.
  • Excessive weight loss, which may affect a child’s growth.
  • Risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors. Symptoms can include:
    • thoughts about harming yourself
  • Behavioral changes, such as aggression.
  • Withdrawal symptoms* if you suddenly stop taking Diacomit. These may include:
    • status epilepticus (a seizure episode that lasts longer than 30 minutes, which is a medical emergency)
  • Severe allergic reaction.†

* With withdrawal, you experience uncomfortable reactions when you stop receiving a substance your body is used to having.
† To learn more about this side effect, see “Allergic reaction” below.

Side effects in children

The side effects listed above are based on the results of clinical trials of children taking Diacomit. It isn’t known if the drug’s side effects would be different in adults. This is because these trials only included children ages 3 years to less than 18 years old with Dravet syndrome.

Diacomit is prescribed in combination with the drug clobazam (Onfi, Sympazan) to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in adults and children. Specifically, it’s approved for use in people ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kilograms (kg). (A body weight of 7 kg is about 15 pounds [lb]).

Dravet syndrome is a rare form of epilepsy that typically starts in the first year of life. (For more information, see the “Diacomit uses” section below.)

Suicide prevention

If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:

  • Ask the tough question: “Are you considering suicide?”
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number, or text TALK to 741741 to communicate with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Try to remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The 988 Suicide and Crisis Lifeline is available 24 hours a day at 988. During a crisis, people who are hard of hearing can use their preferred relay service or dial 711 then 988.

Click here for more links and local resources.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Diacomit. This side effect wasn’t reported in clinical trials of the drug, but it’s still possible.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Diacomit, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Diacomit dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the severity of your condition
  • your age
  • your body weight in kilograms (kg)
  • other medications you take

Your doctor may adjust your dosage over time to reach the amount that’s right for you.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms

Diacomit is an oral drug that comes in two forms:

  • capsules
  • packets of powder you’ll mix in water to make a liquid suspension (see the “How to take Diacomit” section to learn more)

Drug strengths (250 mg and 500 mg)

Diacomit is available in two strengths:

  • 250 milligrams (mg)
  • 500 mg

Dosage for seizures due to Dravet syndrome

Diacomit’s recommended daily dose is 50 mg per kg of body weight (mg/kg). (One kg is about 2.2 pounds [lb].) This is divided into two or three doses throughout the day.

Your doctor will calculate your dosage based on your body weight and recommend the right dosage for you. They may round the dosage based on the drug’s available strengths.

For example, a person who weighs 60 kg (about 132 lb) may be prescribed 1,000 mg of Diacomit three times per day.

The maximum dosage of Diacomit is 3,000 mg per day.

Children’s dosage

Diacomit is approved to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in children ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kg (about 15 lb). (For specific information about this use, see the “Diacomit uses” section below.)

The recommended daily dosage of Diacomit in children is 50 mg/kg. This is divided into two or three doses throughout the day, depending on your child’s age and weight.

Your child’s doctor will calculate their dosage and recommend the proper dosing schedule. They may round the dosage based on the drug’s available strengths.

The table below shows the recommended children’s dosage of Diacomit:

Child’s ageBody weightTotal daily dosageDosing schedule
6 months to less than 1 year old7 kg or more (about 15 lb or more)50 mg/kg25 mg/kg twice per day
1 year and older7 kg to less than 10 kg (about 15 lb to less than 22 lb)50 mg/kg25 mg/kg twice per day
1 year and older10 kg or more (about 22 lb or more)50 mg/kg25 mg/kg twice per day or 16.67 mg/kg three times per day

For example, if your child is 8 months old and weighs 10 kg (about 22 lb), their doctor may prescribe 250 mg of Diacomit twice per day.

The maximum dosage of Diacomit is 3,000 mg per day. It’s important not to give your child more than their prescribed number of doses per day.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Diacomit, take the missed dose as soon as possible. If it’s almost time for the next dose, skip the missed dose. Then take your next dose at the regular time. You should not double the next dose to make up for the missed dose.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Diacomit is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Diacomit is safe and effective for your condition, you’ll likely take it long term.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Diacomit to treat certain conditions. Diacomit may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use is when an FDA-approved drug is prescribed for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Diacomit for seizures due to Dravet syndrome

Diacomit is FDA-approved to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in adults and children. Specifically, it’s approved for use in people ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kilograms (kg), or about 15 pounds (lb). For this use, Diacomit is prescribed with clobazam (Onfi, Sympazan).

It isn’t known if Diacomit can be used alone to treat Dravet syndrome in adults or children.

Seizures and Dravet syndrome explained

Dravet syndrome is a rare form of epilepsy (seizure disorder). It typically starts in the first year of life.

The condition causes frequent seizures that may last 10 minutes or longer. These seizures may be triggered by changes in temperature, such as a fever or warm weather. Seizure symptoms and patterns may change as the child gets older.

Frequent, prolonged seizures can cause brain damage. This may lead to cognitive disabilities and behavioral disorders.

Dravet syndrome is associated with a mutation (abnormal change) in a gene called SCN1A. This mutation occurs randomly in a fetus and is not usually inherited from a parent.

There is no known cure for Dravet syndrome. And its related seizures can be resistant to standard treatments. So, the treatment goal for this condition is to reduce the length and frequency of seizures.

To learn more about managing your condition, see MNT’s epilepsy and seizures hub.

Effectiveness for seizures due to Dravet syndrome

In clinical trials, Diacomit treatment was shown to reduce the frequency of seizures caused by Dravet syndrome in people who also take clobazam. This is why your doctor will typically prescribe clobazam with Diacomit to treat your condition. (For more information, see the “Diacomit use with other drugs” section below.)

You can learn more about Diacomit’s clinical trial results by viewing this website. You can also talk with your doctor.

Diacomit and children

Diacomit is FDA-approved to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in children ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kg (about 15 lb). For this use, Diacomit is prescribed with clobazam (Onfi, Sympazan).

For more information, see “Diacomit for seizures due to Dravet syndrome” just above.

Diacomit is prescribed along with clobazam to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in certain adults and children. (For more details about this use, see the “Diacomit uses” section above.)

Clobazam is available as the brand-name drugs Onfi and Sympazan. Similar to Diacomit, clobazam is another anti-seizure medication.

If this drug combination causes bothersome or severe side effects, your doctor may adjust your dosage of clobazam. (For information about side effects of Diacomit, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.)

Your doctor may also prescribe other anti-seizure drugs, such as valproic acid (Depakote and Depakote ER), to help prevent or treat seizures.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about taking other treatments for your condition.

You should not take Diacomit with alcohol. Drinking alcohol while taking Diacomit increases the risk of excessive sleepiness, a possible side effect of the drug. (For information about side effects of Diacomit, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.)

Also, heavy alcohol use may cause liver problems. And it isn’t known if Diacomit is safe for people with liver problems.

If you have concerns about avoiding alcohol while taking Diacomit, talk with your doctor.

Diacomit can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe. Drug-condition interactions can also cause certain effects. For information about these interactions, see the “Diacomit precautions” section below.

Diacomit and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Diacomit. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Diacomit.

Before taking Diacomit, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

Drugs that can interact with Diacomit include:

Central nervous system (CNS) depressants. This is a category of drugs that cause CNS depression (a slowing down of the body’s neurological activity). When Diacomit is taken with these drugs, excessive sleepiness* could occur. Examples of CNS depressants include:

Drugs that affect certain enzymes. Taking Diacomit with certain drugs that affect the enzymes CYP3A4 and CYP2C19 could increase the risk of drug side effects. Or these interactions could reduce Diacomit’s effectiveness. Because of these interaction risks, your doctor may adjust the dosages of certain medications if they prescribe them with Diacomit. A few examples include:

Drugs affected by Diacomit. You may have an increased risk of side effects from certain other drugs if you take Diacomit with them. Diacomit could also reduce the effectiveness of certain other medications. Due to these risks, your doctor may adjust the dose of other medications if they prescribe Diacomit. A few examples include:

The above list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Diacomit. If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

* Excessive sleepiness is a side effect of Diacomit. For more information about side effects of Diacomit, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.
† Diacomit is prescribed with clobazam to treat seizures caused by Dravet syndrome. If the combination causes bothersome or severe side effects, your doctor may adjust your dosage of clobazam. For more details, see the “Diacomit use with other drugs” section above.

Diacomit and herbs and supplements

Diacomit can interact with certain herbs or dietary supplements. For example, St. John’s wort, an herbal remedy thought to ease depression, could make Diacomit less effective.

Because of the risk of interactions, you should check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any herbs or supplements while taking Diacomit.

Diacomit and foods

Diacomit may interact with grapefruit. Taking this drug with grapefruit or grapefruit juice may increase the risk of side effects.

Your doctor may recommend a ketogenic diet (a high fat, low carb diet) to help manage your condition. If you have any questions about eating certain foods with Diacomit, talk with your doctor.

You should take Diacomit according to the instructions your doctor gives you.

Diacomit is typically taken two or three times per day with meals.*

  • To take Diacomit capsules, swallow each capsule whole with a glass of water. Be sure to take it during a meal.
  • To take Diacomit powder, mix the contents of the packet into a cup of water, and then drink it right away. The drug comes with detailed instructions for mixing the powder. Instructions are also available from the drug’s medication guide.

Depending on your prescribed dosage, you many need to take multiple capsules or powder packets for each dose. Your doctor will advise how many capsules or powder packets you’ll take in this case.

Also, in some cases, your doctor may prescribe you two different strengths of the drug. For example, if your dose is 1,250 milligrams (mg), you may take two 500-mg capsules and one 250-mg capsule for each dose. (For more information about dosage, see the “Diacomit dosage” section above.)

If you have questions about how to take Diacomit, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* Your doctor may recommend a ketogenic diet (a high fat, low carb diet) to help manage your condition. If you have questions about this type of diet, talk with your doctor.

When to take

When you’ll take Diacomit depends on whether your doctor prescribes two or three doses per day.

The table below shows examples of dosing schedules for Diacomit. Make sure to talk with your doctor about the dosing schedule that’s best for you.

Diacomit dosing frequencyFirst doseSecond doseThird dose
twice per daymorning mealevening mealnone
3 times per daymorning mealmidday mealevening meal

Be sure to take Diacomit on a consistent schedule. This helps keep a steady level of the drug in your body, which helps Diacomit work effectively.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or using a timer. You could also download a reminder app on your phone.

Accessible labels and containers

If your prescription label is hard to read, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. Some pharmacies offer labels that have large print, braille, or a code you scan with a smartphone to convert text to speech.

If you have trouble opening medication bottles, ask your pharmacist if they can put Diacomit in an easy-open container. They also may be able to recommend tools that can make it simpler to open lids.

Taking Diacomit with food

You’ll take Diacomit with food and water. You should take each dose during a meal, based on the dosing schedule your doctor prescribes.

Can Diacomit capsules be opened, crushed, split, or chewed?

No, Diacomit capsules should not be opened, crushed, split, or chewed. Be sure to swallow the capsules whole with a glass of water.

If you have trouble swallowing Diacomit capsules, tell your doctor. They’ll likely prescribe the powder form of the drug instead. The powder form is mixed with water to make a liquid suspension that you’ll drink.

Diacomit is FDA-approved to treat seizures related to Dravet syndrome in adults and in children. Specifically, it’s approved for use in people ages 6 months and older who weigh at least 7 kilograms (kg), or about 15 pounds (lb). For this use, Diacomit is prescribed along with clobazam (Onfi, Sympazan).

Diacomit contains the active drug stiripentol. Experts don’t fully understand how stiripentol works. It may work to reduce the frequency of seizures by increasing the activity of gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA). GABA is a brain chemical that helps calm or stop signals in the brain related to seizures.

Diacomit is also thought to block the activity of certain enzymes in the liver. This leads to increased blood levels and effects of clobazam.

How long does it take to work?

Diacomit starts working within a few hours after taking the first dose. In Diacomit’s clinical trials, people who took the drug saw a decrease in the frequency of their seizures within two months.

If you have questions about how Diacomit works or what to expect from treatment, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

It is unknown if Diacomit is safe to take during pregnancy. In animal studies, Diacomit caused harmful effects in pregnant animals and their developing fetuses. However, animal studies don’t always predict what happens in humans. Researchers haven’t studied the drug’s effects during human pregnancy.

If you’re pregnant or trying to become pregnant, talk with your doctor. They can suggest safe ways to manage your condition during this time.

Pregnancy registry

If you take anti-seizure medications such as Diacomit during pregnancy, consider participating in the North American Antiepileptic Drug (NAAED) pregnancy registry.

Pregnancy registries collect information about the impact of certain drugs on pregnancy outcomes. This can help people and healthcare professionals make informed decisions about taking certain drugs during pregnancy.

You can learn more about the NAAED registry by visiting this website or calling 888-233-2334. You can also talk with your doctor.

It’s not known if Diacomit is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re taking Diacomit.

For more information about taking Diacomit during pregnancy, see the “Diacomit and pregnancy” section above.

It isn’t known if it is safe to breastfeed a child while taking Diacomit. Researchers haven’t studied the effects of this drug on human breast milk or breastfed children.

If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor. They will likely recommend another way to feed your child.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Diacomit.

Does Diacomit stop seizures completely?

It’s possible for Diacomit to stop seizures completely. In clinical trials, 7 out of 10 people taking Diacomit with clobazam* saw a 50% decrease in their seizure frequency. In one of these trials, more than a third of people were seizure-free during the second month of treatment.

It’s important to note that individual results can vary, and not all people responded to the drug in these trials.

Talk with your doctor about what to expect from Diacomit treatment. You can also learn more about the results of Diacomit’s clinical trials by viewing the drug’s prescribing information.

* Diacomit is prescribed with clobazam to treat seizures caused by Dravet syndrome. For more details, see the “Diacomit use with other drugs” section above.

Is it safe to drive during Diacomit treatment?

No, it isn’t safe to drive during Diacomit treatment. This is because Diacomit may cause excessive sleepiness as a side effect. This can make driving dangerous. (For more details about Diacomit’s side effects, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.)

If you drive, talk with your doctor about whether it’s safe to do so while taking Diacomit.

Are any blood tests or monitoring needed while taking Diacomit?

Yes. Before you start treatment with Diacomit, your doctor will have you get a blood test. This test will check the levels of your neutrophils (a type of white blood cell) and platelets (a type of blood cell that’s important for clotting). You’ll get this blood test every 6 months for as long as you’re taking the drug.

This monitoring is important because Diacomit may lower the levels of these blood cells as a side effect. Neutropenia (low levels of neutrophils) may increase the risk of serious infection. And thrombocytopenia (low levels of platelets) may lead to bleeding problems.

Talk with your doctor if you have questions about monitoring for Diacomit’s side effects. (For more information about Diacomit’s side effects, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.)

Will Diacomit affect my child’s growth?

It’s possible for Diacomit, specifically it’s side effects, to affect your child’s growth. Examples of these side effects include decreased appetite, weight loss, nausea, and vomiting. (To learn more, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.)

During Diacomit treatment, your child’s doctor will closely monitor your child’s growth. They may suggest ways to help your child maintain a weight that’s healthy for them. For example, they may recommend dietary supplements or formulas to ensure your child receives enough nutrients to grow.

Keep in mind that the dosage of Diacomit is based on a person’s body weight. Changes in body weight may require dosage adjustments by the doctor. (For more information about dosage, see the “Diacomit dosage” section above.)

If you have questions about your child’s growth while they take Diacomit, be sure to talk with their doctor.

This drug comes with several precautions. These are considered drug-condition interactions. Before taking Diacomit, talk with your doctor about your health history. Diacomit may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Phenylketonuria (PKU). Diacomit powder contains aspartame. It’s an artificial sweetener that contains phenylalanine, which can be harmful to people with PKU. Be sure to tell your doctor if you have PKU. If you’re able to swallow pills, they’ll likely prescribe Diacomit capsules instead. The capsules do not contain phenylalanine.
  • Liver or kidney problems. The liver and kidneys play important roles in breaking down Diacomit and clearing it out of the body. So, this drug isn’t recommended in people who have moderate to severe liver or kidney problems. If you have a health condition that affects your liver or kidneys, talk with your doctor. They’ll help determine if you can safely take Diacomit with your condition.
  • Mental health condition. Rarely, taking Diacomit may raise the risk of suicidal thoughts or behaviors. If you already have a mental health condition, such as depression, talk with your doctor. They can explain what you and your household members should watch for while taking Diacomit. These include signs of worsening depression or other behavior changes.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Diacomit or any of its ingredients, your doctor will likely not prescribe Diacomit. Ask your doctor what other medications may be better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It isn’t known if Diacomit is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Diacomit and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s unknown if it’s safe to breastfeed a child while taking Diacomit. For more details, see the “Diacomit and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Diacomit, see the “Diacomit side effects” section above.

Do not use more Diacomit than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Diacomit

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. However, if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Diacomit from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle or packaging. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Diacomit should be stored at room temperature (68°F to 77°F or 20°C to 25°C) in a tightly sealed container away from light. You may temporarily store Diacomit at higher or lower temperatures (ranging from 59°F to 86°F or 15°C to 30°C), such as when you’re traveling. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Diacomit and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.