Dupixent (dupilumab) is a prescription brand-name medication. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved it to treat:

The active drug in Dupixent is dupilumab, which is a biologic. It belongs to a group of drugs called interleukin-4 receptor alpha antagonists. Dupixent is given as a subcutaneous injection, and it comes as a prefilled syringe or a prefilled pen.

At this time, Dupixent is only available as a brand-name drug. There aren’t any generic forms of Dupixent available.

For information on the dosage of Dupixent, including its form, its strengths, and how to take the drug, keep reading. For a comprehensive look at Dupixent, see this article.

* For this purpose, Dupixent is taken with other medications.

This article describes typical dosages for Dupixent provided by the drug’s manufacturer. When taking Dupixent, always follow the dosage prescribed by your doctor.

Below are the recommended dosages of Dupixent. But your doctor will recommend the best dosage for you based on certain factors.

Dupixent form

Dupixent comes as a liquid solution inside of a prefilled syringe or a prefilled pen. It’s given by subcutaneous injection.

Dupixent strengths

Dupixent syringes and pens are available in the following strengths:

  • 200 milligrams in 1.14 milliliters of solution (200 mg/1.14 mL)
  • 300 mg/2 mL

Typical dosages

Depending on the condition you’re taking Dupixent for, your doctor will usually start you on a loading (starting) dose of the drug. A loading dose is a higher dose of medication that’s given at the start of treatment. This allows the medication to start working quickly.

After receiving a loading dose, you’ll continue treatment with maintenance doses. These are lower doses that maintain a consistent level of the drug in your body over time. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. In most cases, Dupixent is given every other week. This medication doesn’t require weekly dosing. But be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. They’ll determine the best dosage schedule to fit your needs.

Dosages for eczema in adults and children

Dupixent is approved for eczema treatment in adults and children ages 6 years and older. The loading dose of Dupixent for eczema in adults is 600 mg (two 300-mg injections). After this starting dose, the typical maintenance dosage for eczema is 300 mg every other week.

Dupixent’s pediatric dosage (dosage for children) is based on body weight in kilograms (kg).* Below is a chart showing the dosing recommendations for children ages 6 to 17 years:

Body weightLoading (starting) doseMaintenance dosage
15 kg to 29 kg (33 pounds [lb] to 65 lb)600 mg, given as two 300-mg injections300 mg every 4 weeks
30 kg to 59 kg (66 lb to 131 lb)400 mg, given as two 200-mg injections200 mg every other week
60 kg (132 lb) or more600 mg, given as two 300-mg injections300 mg every other week

* 1 kg is about 2.2 lb.

Dosages for asthma in adults and children

Dupixent is approved for asthma treatment in adults and children ages 12 years and older. For moderate asthma, the typical loading dose of Dupixent is 400 mg (two 200-mg injections). After this, the maintenance dosage for moderate asthma is typically 200 mg every other week.

If you have severe asthma, or if you also have eczema, your doctor may recommend that you take a higher dose of Dupixent. In this case, you may be prescribed a loading dose of 600 mg (two 300-mg injections). After this, the typical maintenance dosage for this use is 300 mg every other week.

Dosage for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps

The dosage of Dupixent for chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps in adults is 300 mg every other week. Dupixent isn’t approved to be used in children who have chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyps.

Dupixent injections are usually given every other week. In this case, if you miss a dose, you can take your missed dose within 7 days. Then, you can continue with your normal dosing schedule. But if it’s been more than 7 days since your missed dose, skip the dose and take your next dose on your normally scheduled day.

For eczema treatment, Dupixent is sometimes taken every 4 weeks. In this case, if you miss a dose, you can take it at any time. But you should try to take the missed dose within 7 days of its scheduled day because:

  • If you take your missed dose within 7 days, you can continue with your regular dosing schedule going forward.
  • If you take your missed dose more than 7 days later, you’ll start a new 4-week dosing schedule on the day you take your missed dose.

If you’re not sure if you should take a missed injection of Dupixent, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They’ll be able to help determine how to continue your dosing.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app.

The Dupixent dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the condition you’re using Dupixent to treat
  • your age
  • any other medications you’re taking
  • any other medical conditions you may have
  • body weight (for children using Dupixent to treat eczema)

Your doctor will determine the best dosage for you based on these factors.

Dupixent is given as a subcutaneous injection. It comes as a liquid solution in a prefilled syringe or a prefilled pen. Dupixent should be stored in a refrigerator at 36°F to 46°F (2°C to 8°C) and kept away from light.

Your first dose of Dupixent will be given in your doctor’s office. Your doctor or healthcare professional may teach you how to inject Dupixent so that you can give the injections at home.

Before injecting Dupixent, let the medication come to room temperature. This usually takes 30 minutes to 45 minutes.

You should take Dupixent injections in your thigh or your abdominal (belly) area. If you’re using the abdominal area, don’t inject Dupixent within 2 inches of your belly button.

If Dupixent injections are given by a healthcare professional or a caregiver (such as a parent), the drug can be injected into the upper arm. But you shouldn’t give yourself Dupixent into your upper arm on your own.

Be sure to change your injection site with each dose. And don’t give an injection into any areas that are bruised, scarred, or tender.

For detailed instructions on how to use Dupixent syringes and pens, see the manufacturer’s website.

It’s important that you don’t use more Dupixent than your doctor prescribes. For some medications, taking more than the recommended amount may lead to side effects or overdose.

If you take more than the recommended amount of Dupixent

Call your doctor right away if you believe you’ve taken too much of Dupixent. Another option is to call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. If you have severe symptoms, immediately call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room.

The dosages in this article are typical dosages provided by the drug manufacturer. If your doctor recommends Dupixent for you, they’ll prescribe the dosage that’s right for you. Always follow the dosage that your doctor prescribes for you.

As with any drug, never change your dosage of Dupixent without your doctor’s recommendation. If you have questions about the dosage of Dupixent that’s right for you, talk with your doctor.

Besides learning about dosage, you may want other information about Dupixent. These additional articles might be helpful to you:

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or another healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.