Ubrelvy is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat migraine that occurs with or without aura.

Migraine is a condition that can cause a severe headache along with other symptoms. Before a migraine attack, some people may have sensory changes known as an aura.

Ubrelvy is approved for acute (immediate) treatment of migraine in adults. It’s not approved to prevent migraine. For more information about how to use Ubrelvy, see the “Ubrelvy for migraine” section below.

Drug details

Ubrelvy contains the active drug ubrogepant. It belongs to a group of drugs called oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists. These drugs are more commonly known as gepants.

Ubrelvy comes as a tablet that’s taken by mouth when migraine symptoms start to occur. Ubrelvy is available in two strengths: 50 milligrams (mg) and 100 mg.

FDA approval

Ubrelvy received Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approval in 2019. It was the first oral (taken by mouth) CGRP antagonist approved for the acute treatment of migraine.

In 2020, another oral CGRP antagonist was also approved for acute migraine treatment. This drug is called rimegepant (Nurtec ODT).

This article focuses on Ubrelvy, not rimegepant. If you’re interested in learning more about rimegepant, talk with your doctor.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Ubrelvy, see the “Ubrelvy for migraine” section below.

Ubrelvy is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

As with all medications, the cost of Ubrelvy can vary. To find current prices for Ubrelvy in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Ubrelvy. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Ubrelvy, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re unsure whether you’ll need to get prior authorization for Ubrelvy, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Ubrelvy, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Allergan, Inc., the manufacturer of Ubrelvy, offers a Ubrelvy U-Save Card and an Allergan Patient Assistance Program. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 844-4-UBRELVY (844-482-7358) or visit the drug website.

Mail-order pharmacies

Ubrelvy may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Ubrelvy, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Ubrelvy is not available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Ubrelvy can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Ubrelvy. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Ubrelvy, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Ubrelvy can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Ubrelvy. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or refer to Ubrelvy’s patient information.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Ubrelvy aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects of Ubrelvy can include an allergic reaction. There are no other known serious side effects of Ubrelvy. For more information about allergic reactions, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug or whether certain side effects occur due to it. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may or may not cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Ubrelvy. However, it’s not known how often allergic reactions may have occurred in clinical studies of the drug.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth, swelling, or redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Nausea

Nausea is the most common side effect reported in clinical studies of Ubrelvy.

In clinical studies, 2% to 4% of people who took Ubrelvy had nausea, depending on their dosage. In comparison, 2% of people who took a placebo (a treatment with no active drug) had nausea.

Nausea can also be a symptom of migraine, which Ubrelvy is used to treat. If you have nausea that’s bothersome or severe while taking Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor about ways to manage this side effect. They may recommend taking antinausea medication.

Sleepiness

It’s possible to feel sleepy or fatigued (lacking energy) after taking Ubrelvy.

In clinical studies, 2% to 3% of people who took Ubrelvy experienced sleepiness or fatigue, depending on their dosage. In comparison, 1% of people who took a placebo had these side effects.

Having a migraine attack can also make you sleepy and cause fatigue. If you feel sleepy due to migraine attacks or after taking Ubrelvy, don’t drive or use machinery until you’ve recovered. And, talk with your doctor about other activities you may need to avoid after taking Ubrelvy.

Dry mouth

Ubrelvy can cause a dry mouth. For example, in clinical studies, less than 1% to 2% of people who took Ubrelvy had a dry mouth, depending on their dosage. In comparison, 1% of people who took a placebo had a dry mouth.

If you have a dry mouth while taking Ubrelvy, this can typically be relieved by sipping water. If this side effect bothers you, talk with your doctor.

Other drugs are available that can be used for acute (immediate) treatment of migraine. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat migraine. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Alternatives for migraine

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat symptoms of migraine that occurs with or without aura include:

Ubrelvy is not approved to prevent migraines, but it may be used off-label for this purpose. Examples of other medications that may be used to prevent migraine include:

Ubrelvy and triptans are drugs used for acute (immediate) treatment of migraine. But, they’re not used to prevent migraine attacks. Here we look at how Ubrelvy and triptans are alike and different.

What are triptans?

Triptans are a class of drugs. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.) Triptans are also called serotonin agonists. They work to narrow blood vessels in the brain, which can reduce migraine symptoms.

Triptans can come in several forms. These include tablets, nasal sprays, and injections. Examples of triptans include:

  • almotriptan (Axert)
  • eletriptan (Relpax)
  • frovatriptan (Frova)
  • naratriptan (Amerge)
  • rizatriptan (Maxalt)
  • sumatriptan (Imitrex,* Tosymra, Onzetra Xsail, Zembrace Symtouch)
  • zolmitriptan (Zomig)

Ubrelvy isn’t a triptan. Instead, Ubrelvy belongs to a class of drugs called oral calcitonin gene-receptor peptide (CGRP) antagonists. Oral CGRP antagonists are more commonly known as gepants.

* To learn more about how Ubrelvy compares with Imitrex, see the “Ubrelvy vs. Imitrex” section below.

How are Ubrelvy and triptans alike?

Gepants (such as Ubrelvy) and triptans both work to relieve migraine symptoms. Both types of drugs do this by:

  • narrowing blood vessels in the brain, and
  • reducing pain signals in the trigeminal nerve (the nerve that allows you to feel sensation in your head and face)

Ubrelvy hasn’t been directly compared with triptans in clinical studies. But, studies have found both Ubrelvy and triptans to be effective for relieving migraine symptoms. These symptoms included migraine headache, nausea, and sensitivity to light or sound.

How are Ubrelvy and triptans different?

Ubrelvy acts more precisely on the underlying cause of migraine symptoms than triptans do.

Specifically, Ubrelvy works to block the CGRP protein. This protein is found in high levels in the brain during a migraine attack. CGRP causes swelling and widening of blood vessels in the brain. It also increases pain signals in the trigeminal nerve. By blocking CGRP, Ubrelvy can reverse its effects and reduce migraine symptoms.

Ubrelvy and triptans can also cause different side effects. For example, the most common side effect of triptans is vasoconstriction (narrowing of blood vessels). This can cause mild symptoms, such as numbness, tingling sensations, or feeling hot or cold. It can also cause pain, pressure, or tightness that affects your chest, throat, neck, or jaw. Vasoconstriction can also lead to serious side effects, including a heart attack, very high blood pressure, or reduced blood flow to your intestines.

Ubrelvy, however, usually causes very few side effects, and it doesn’t cause vasoconstriction. The most common side effects of Ubrelvy are sleepiness and nausea. For this reason, Ubrelvy may be a good option for people who have bothersome or severe side effects from triptans. Ubrelvy may also be useful for people who can’t take triptans, such as people with heart disease or hemiplegic migraines.

If you have questions about how Ubrelvy compares with triptan treatment for migraine, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

You may wonder how Ubrelvy compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Ubrelvy and Imitrex are alike and different.

Ingredients

Ubrelvy contains the active drug ubrogepant. Imitrex contains the active drug sumatriptan.

Ubrelvy belongs to a group of drugs called gepants, while Imitrex belongs to a group of drugs called triptans. (To read more about triptans and gepants, see the “Ubrelvy vs. triptans” section directly above.)

Uses

Both Ubrelvy and Imitrex are approved for the acute (immediate) treatment of migraine that occurs with or without aura. Both drugs can be given to adults for this purpose.

Imitrex is also FDA-approved to treat cluster headaches in adults when the drug is given as an injection.

Neither drug is used to prevent migraine or cluster headaches.

Drug forms and administration

Ubrelvy comes as a tablet that’s taken by mouth.

Imitrex comes in the following forms:

  • a tablet that’s taken by mouth
  • a single-dose nasal spray
  • a single-dose prefilled syringe cartridge, for use in an Imitrex STATdose injection pen
  • a single-dose vial of a solution, for injection with a syringe

With both Ubrelvy and Imitrex, you should take a dose as soon as possible when migraine symptoms begin.

Side effects and risks

Ubrelvy and Imitrex belong to different drug classes. These medications can cause some similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with either Ubrelvy or Imitrex, as well as mild side effects that both drugs may share.

  • Can occur with Ubrelvy:
  • Can occur with Imitrex:
    • weakness
    • feeling warm or cold
    • tingling or numbness in your fingers or toes
    • pain, pressure, or tightness in your chest, throat, neck, or jaw
    • irritation in your nose or throat, such as burning, tingling, pain, or numbness (if taken as a nasal spray)
    • an unpleasant taste in your mouth (if taken as a nasal spray)
    • injection site reactions (if taken as an injection), such as pain, stinging, redness, or swelling
  • Can occur with both Ubrelvy and Imitrex:
    • sleepiness

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with either Ubrelvy or Imitrex, as well as serious side effects that both drugs may share.

  • Can occur with Ubrelvy:
    • few unique serious side effects
  • Can occur with Imitrex:
    • a stroke (a partial or complete blockage in blood supply to part of the brain)
    • bleeding in the brain
    • problems with blood circulation in your hands, feet, legs, or arms, such as Raynaud’s disease
    • reduced blood flow to your stomach or intestines
    • serotonin syndrome (a dangerous condition caused by high levels of serotonin in your body)
    • medication overuse headache, also called rebound headache, which can occur if you take the drug too often
  • Can occur with both Ubrelvy and Imitrex:

Effectiveness

Ubrelvy and Imitrex have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to treat migraine that occurs with or without aura in adults.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. But, studies have found both Ubrelvy and Imitrex to be effective for treating migraine.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Ubrelvy and Imitrex generally cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Ubrelvy and Imitrex are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of Ubrelvy. However, generic forms of Imitrex are available. (A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand name drugs.)

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Ubrelvy to treat certain conditions. Ubrelvy may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Ubrelvy for migraine

Ubrelvy is FDA-approved to treat migraine that occurs with or without aura in adults.

Migraine is a neurological condition, which means it affects the central nervous system can cause severe headaches, which may last several hours or sometimes days. It may also cause nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light or sound. Having any of these symptoms may be referred to as having a migraine attack or migraine episode.

About one-third of people with migraine also have an aura before or during the headache. Auras typically cause sensory symptoms, such as tingling or buzzing sensations or changes to your vision. Vision changes may include seeing blind spots, flashing lights, or zig-zag lines. Some people also have trouble speaking.

Ubrelvy is approved for the acute (immediate) treatment of migraine. It’s not approved to prevent migraine.

Effectiveness for migraine

Ubrelvy has been effective for acute treatment of migraine in clinical studies.

In these studies, people took Ubrelvy or a placebo to treat a moderate or severe migraine headache. (A placebo is a treatment with no active drug.) Researchers looked at the percentage of people who had relief from their migraine symptoms 2 hours after taking a dose.

The following results were seen:

2 hours after taking Ubrelvy:2 hours after taking a placebo:
People who had migraine pain relief*60.7% to 62.7%48.2% to 49.1%
People who had no migraine pain19.2% to 21.8%11.8% to 14.3%
People who no longer had their most bothersome symptom†37.7% to 38.9%27.4% to 27.8%

In these studies, Ubrelvy also produced long-lasting pain relief for some people. 2 hours after taking Ubrelvy, 12.7% to 15.4% of people who had no migraine pain continued to have no migraine pain for up to 24 hours after taking Ubrelvy. In comparison, 8.2% to 8.6% of people who had no migraine pain 2 hours after taking a placebo also had no migraine pain up to 24 hours later.

* In this study, pain relief reduced people’s headache severity to mild or their headache completely went away.
† People’s most bothersome symptoms in this study may have included nausea or sensitivity to light or sound.

Off-label use for Ubrelvy

In addition to the use listed above, Ubrelvy may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA. Below is an example of an off-label use for Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy for tension headache

Ubrelvy isn’t FDA-approved to treat tension headache, and it’s unlikely to be prescribed for this use. At this time, the drug isn’t being studied as a potential treatment for tension headache.

The cause of tension headache isn’t fully understood. To treat migraine, Ubrelvy works to block a protein in the brain, called CGRP, which may be involved in causing migraine symptoms. But it’s not known if this same protein is involved in causing tension headaches. (For details, see the “How Ubrelvy works” section below.)

If you’re interested in taking Ubrelvy for tension headache, talk with your doctor.

Ubrelvy and children

Ubrelvy is not approved for use in children. And, it’s not known if the drug may be safe or effective for treating migraine in children.

The Ubrelvy dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • your kidney function
  • your liver function
  • any other medications you take

The following dosing instructions describe dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Note: Ubrelvy isn’t meant to be taken every day. You should only take it when you have a migraine attack. And, you shouldn’t take Ubrelvy to treat more than 8 migraine attacks every month (30 days). It’s not known if it’s safe to take the drug more often than this.

Drug forms and strengths

Ubrelvy comes as a tablet that you take by mouth. It’s available in two strengths: 50 milligrams (mg) and 100 mg.

Dosage for migraine

The typical dosage of Ubrelvy is 50 mg or 100 mg. You should take a dose as soon as possible after migraine symptoms start.

As long as your doctor approves, you may take a second dose of Ubrelvy as needed. If your first dose doesn’t fully relieve your migraine, or your migraine comes back, you may take a second dose. You should take the second dose at least 2 hours after the first dose.

It’s important to note that you shouldn’t take a second dose of Ubrelvy if you take certain other medications or if you’ve been drinking grapefruit juice. To read more about this, see the “Ubrelvy interactions” section below.

The maximum dose of Ubrelvy is 200 mg in 24 hours. You shouldn’t take Ubrelvy to treat more than 8 migraine attacks per month (30 days).

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Ubrelvy isn’t meant to be used as a long-term treatment. And it’s not approved to prevent migraines. If you and your doctor determine that Ubrelvy is safe and effective for you, you’ll only take it when you need it to treat a migraine.

You shouldn’t take Ubrelvy to treat more than 8 migraine attacks per month (30 days). And if you have migraines more often than 4 times per month, talk with your doctor about ways to help prevent them.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Ubrelvy.

What is Ubrelvy’s mechanism of action?

Ubrelvy works to treat migraines by stopping the effects of a protein called calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP). CGRP may be a main cause of migraine symptoms. It affects blood vessels and pain signals in the brain. And, high levels of CGRP are released in the brain during a migraine. By blocking CGRP’s effects, Ubrelvy can relieve migraine symptoms.

To read more about Ubrelvy’s mechanism of action, see the “How Ubrelvy works” section below.

Is Ubrelvy a controlled substance?

No. Ubrelvy is a prescription medication, but it isn’t a controlled substance.

Controlled substances are drugs that have a high potential for being misused, usually because they can make people feel “high.” Controlled substances also have a high risk of causing dependence. With dependence, your body needs the drug to function normally.

Because of these risks, there are additional rules for how controlled substances are prescribed and dispensed. Some pain medications, such as opioids, are controlled substances. However, Ubrelvy doesn’t have these risks and doesn’t have additional rules for how it’s prescribed. If you have questions about this, talk with your doctor.

Does Ubrelvy cause weight loss?

It’s not known to. Weight loss wasn’t reported in clinical studies of Ubrelvy.

Weight loss isn’t a known side effect of any drugs used to treat migraine. But weight loss can be a side effect of some drugs used to prevent migraine attacks, such as Topamax (topiramate). Also, some people temporarily lose their appetite during or after a migraine. So, having frequent migraines could lead to weight loss over time.

If you’re concerned about the effect of migraine or migraine treatment on your weight, talk with your doctor.

What kind of drug is Ubrelvy?

Ubrelvy belongs to a new class of drugs, called oral calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) antagonists. These are more commonly known as gepants. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Ubrelvy was the first CGRP antagonist that could be taken orally (by mouth). It was approved in 2019 for acute (immediate) treatment of migraine that occurs with or without aura. However, Ubrelvy is not used to prevent migraine.

If you have questions about what kind of drug Ubrelvy is or how it works, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Will Ubrelvy cure migraine?

No, Ubrelvy can’t cure migraine. The drug won’t prevent future migraines, but it can relieve migraine symptoms.

There aren’t currently any treatments that can cure migraine. But, various treatments are available that may help prevent migraine attacks. If you have migraines more than 4 times per month, talk with your doctor about ways to help prevent them.

Why should I keep track of migraine attacks when taking Ubrelvy?

It’s important to track your migraine symptoms and the times when you take Ubrelvy. This is because you shouldn’t take Ubrelvy to treat more than 8 migraine attacks per month (30 days). And if you have more than 4 migraine attacks per month, you should talk with your doctor about potential ways to help prevent them.

Keeping track of your migraine symptoms can help you and your doctor see how well Ubrelvy works for you. You should note how often you have migraines and what your symptoms are. You should also track how long your symptoms last, with or without Ubrelvy treatment. Also, you can record potential triggers of your migraine attacks. This can help you identify patterns in what might trigger them.

You can also note any side effects you may be having from Ubrelvy. Your doctor may adjust your Ubrelvy dose based on some of the factors you have tracked if needed. To help keep track of this information, there are several free migraine trackers available as phone apps.

Ubrelvy is used for acute (immediate) treatment of migraine that occurs with or without aura.

What happens with migraine

During a migraine, levels of a protein called calcitonin gene-receptor related peptide (CGRP) increase in your brain. CGRP is released from your trigeminal nerve. This is the nerve that allows you to feel sensations in your head and face.

CGRP has several effects that help produce the symptoms of a migraine:

  • CGRP causes inflammation (swelling) and vasodilation (widening) of blood vessels in your brain. This may be a main cause of migraine headaches.
  • CGRP also increases pain signals in your brain, which can intensify a headache. This can also cause nausea and increased sensitivity to light and sound.

CGRP produces these effects by attaching to sites called CGRP receptors. These receptors are found on blood vessels and nerves in your brain.

What Ubrelvy does

Ubrelvy is a type of drug called an oral CGRP antagonist. It works to block CGRP receptors in your brain. This prevents CGRP from producing its effects in the brain, which can relieve migraine symptoms.

Ubrelvy may reduce headache, sensitivity to light and sound, and nausea. In some cases, it can quickly provide complete relief from migraine symptoms.

How long does it take to work?

Ubrelvy starts to work soon after you take it. Most people have relief from their migraine symptoms within 2 hours after taking a dose.

The effects of Ubrelvy can last for about 1 day to 1.5 days. This is because Ubrelvy has a half-life of about 5 to 7 hours. The half-life of a drug is how long it takes for the amount of drug in your body to reduce by half. It typically takes about five half-lives for a drug to no longer have any effect in your body.

If you have questions about what to expect from Ubrelvy treatment, talk with your doctor.

You should take Ubrelvy according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

When to take

You should take Ubrelvy as soon as possible after your migraine symptoms start.

As long as your doctor approves, you may take a second dose of Ubrelvy as needed. If your first dose doesn’t fully relieve your migraine, or your migraine comes back, you may take a second dose. You should take the second dose at least 2 hours after the first dose.

It’s important to note that you shouldn’t take a second dose of Ubrelvy if you take certain other medications or if you’ve been drinking grapefruit juice. To read more about this, see the “Ubrelvy interactions” section below.

Taking Ubrelvy with food

Ubrelvy can be taken with or without food.

Can Ubrelvy be crushed, split, or chewed?

No. The manufacturer hasn’t done studies on whether it’s safe or effective to crush, split, or chew Ubrelvy. For this reason, you should swallow Ubrelvy whole.

If you have trouble swallowing Ubrelvy tablets, talk with your doctor.

Ubrelvy can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Ubrelvy and other medications

Below are examples of medications that can interact with Ubrelvy. This article does not contain all drugs that may interact with Ubrelvy.

Before taking Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also, tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Ubrelvy and CYP3A4 inhibitors

Ubrelvy is broken down by an enzyme (a type of protein) in your liver called CYP3A4. CYP3A4 inhibitor medications stop this enzyme from working as well as usual. So, taking Ubrelvy with this type of drug can cause Ubrelvy to build up in your body. And this can increase your risk for side effects from Ubrelvy.

CYP3A4 inhibitor drugs may be strong, moderate, or weak. This describes the drug’s effect on the CYP3A4 enzyme. Depending on the type of CYP3A4 inhibitor you take, you may or may not be able to take Ubrelvy. See below for examples of CYP3A4 inhibitors and details.

Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors

Ubrelvy should not be taken with medications that are strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. Examples of these drugs include:

  • certain antibiotics, such as:
    • telithromycin (Ketek)
  • certain antifungals, such as:
    • itraconazole (Sporanox)
    • posaconazole (Noxafil)
    • voriconazole (Vfend)
  • certain HIV drugs, such as:
    • atazanavir (Reyataz)
    • cobicistat (Tybost)
    • ritonavir (Norvir)
    • indinavir sulfate (Crixivan)
    • nelfinavir mesylate (Viracept)
    • saquinavir mesylate (Invirase)

If you take any of these medications, talk with your doctor about other migraine treatment options besides Ubrelvy.

Moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors

With your doctor’s approval, Ubrelvy can be taken with moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors. But, a low Ubrelvy dose (50 mg) is typically prescribed in these cases.

If you take a moderate CYP3A4 inhibitor, you shouldn’t take a second dose of Ubrelvy within 24 hours of your first dose. This helps make sure that Ubrelvy doesn’t build up in your body while you’re taking both drugs.

Examples of moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors that you may be able to take with a lowered Ubrelvy dose include:

Weak CYP3A4 inhibitors

With your doctor’s approval, Ubrelvy can be taken with weak CYP3A4 inhibitors. But, a low Ubrelvy dose (50 mg) is typically prescribed in these cases. This helps make sure that Ubrelvy doesn’t build up in your body while you’re taking both drugs.

Examples of weak CYP3A4 inhibitors that you may be able to take a low Ubrelvy dose include:

Note: If you take Ubrelvy and a weak CYP3A4 inhibitor, you can take a second dose of Ubrelvy as needed, as long as your doctor approves. Make sure to take the second dose at least 2 hours after your first dose. (See “How to take Ubrelvy” above for details.)

Ubrelvy and CYP3A4 inducers

Ubrelvy is broken down by an enzyme (a type of protein) in your liver called CYP3A4. CYP3A4 inducer medications increase the activity of this enzyme. So, taking Ubrelvy with this type of drug can cause Ubrelvy to break down faster in your body. And this can lower the amount of Ubrelvy in your body and make the drug less effective.

CYP3A4 inducer drugs may be strong, moderate, or weak. This describes the drug’s effect on the CYP3A4 enzyme. Depending on the type of CYP3A4 inducer you take, you may or may not be able to take Ubrelvy. See below for examples of CYP3A4 inducers and details.

Strong CYP3A4 inducers

Ubrelvy is not usually recommended for use with strong CYP3A4 inducers. Examples of these drugs include:

If you take one of these medications, talk with your doctor about migraine treatment options other than Ubrelvy.

Moderate or weak CYP3A4 inducers

With your doctor’s approval, Ubrelvy can be taken with moderate and weak CYP3A4 inducers. But, a high Ubrelvy dose (100 mg) is typically prescribed in these cases. This helps make sure the drug doesn’t break down too quickly in your body.

Examples of moderate and weak CYP3A4 inducers that you may be able to take a high dose of Ubrelvy include:

  • certain seizure medications, such as:
    • phenobarbital
  • modafinil (Provigil), a stimulant drug
  • efavirenz (Sustiva), an HIV drug

Ubrelvy and inhibitors of BCRP and P-gp

BCRP and P-gp are proteins that transport Ubrelvy in your body. Certain medications can stop these proteins from working, and this can increase the amount of Ubrelvy in your body. If you take one of these drugs with Ubrelvy, it can increase your risk for side effects from Ubrelvy.

Examples of drugs that inhibit BCRP, P-gp, or both include:

If you take an inhibitor of BCRP or P-gp, your doctor will typically prescribe a low dose (50 mg) of Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy and ibuprofen

Ubrelvy doesn’t interact with ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin). However, you should only take Ubrelvy with other drugs, including ibuprofen, if your doctor recommends it. In some cases, if Ubrelvy doesn’t relieve your migraine, your doctor may recommend taking ibuprofen or other pain medications.

Ubrelvy and herbs and supplements

Ubrelvy may interact with certain herbs and supplements, which are described below.

Ubrelvy and St. John’s wort

Ubrelvy is broken down in your liver by an enzyme (a type of protein) called CYP3A4. The herb St. John’s wort increases the activity of the CYP3A4 enzyme. So if you take Ubrelvy with St. John’s wort, Ubrelvy is broken down in your body faster than usual. This can lower the amount of Ubrelvy in your body and make the drug less effective.

If you take St. John’s wort, Ubrelvy is not usually recommended for you. Talk with your doctor about migraine treatment options other than Ubrelvy.

Ubrelvy and curcumin

Taking the herb curcumin with Ubrelvy can increase the amount of Ubrelvy in your body. And this can increase your risk for side effects from Ubrelvy. So if you take curcumin, your doctor will typically prescribe a low dose (50 mg) of Ubrelvy for you. (Curcumin is the active ingredient in turmeric.)

Ubrelvy and foods

Eating grapefruit or drinking grapefruit juice with Ubrelvy can increase your risk for side effects from the drug.

This is because Ubrelvy is broken down in your liver by an enzyme (a type of protein) called CYP3A4. Grapefruit inhibits CYP3A4, meaning that it stops the enzyme from working as well as usual. If you take Ubrelvy with grapefruit, Ubrelvy can build up in your body. This can increase your risk for side effects from the drug.

If you eat grapefruit, or drink grapefruit juice, your doctor will typically prescribe a low dose (50 mg) of Ubrelvy for you. And if you eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice, you shouldn’t take a second dose of Ubrelvy within 24 hours of taking your first dose.

Ubrelvy isn’t known to interact with alcohol. However, drinking alcohol with Ubrelvy can increase side effects from Ubrelvy, such as sleepiness and nausea. Drinking alcohol during a migraine can also make migraine symptoms worse.

In some cases, drinking alcohol can trigger a migraine attack. Drinking alcohol only in small amounts or avoiding alcohol completely may help prevent migraine attacks.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about whether alcohol could be a trigger for your migraines. Your doctor can recommend how much alcohol it may be safe for you to drink while taking Ubrelvy.

This drug comes with several precautions. Before taking Ubrelvy, talk with your doctor about your health history. Ubrelvy may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Taking certain medications. Ubrelvy shouldn’t be taken with medications that are strong CYP3A4 inhibitors. This is a contraindication for Ubrelvy use. Contraindications are situations in which a drug must not be used. To read more about medications that should not be taken with Ubrelvy, see the “Ubrelvy interactions” section above.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Ubrelvy or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Ubrelvy. Talk with your doctor about other medications that may be better options for you.
  • Kidney problems. Your kidneys help to remove Ubrelvy from your body. Having kidney problems, such as chronic kidney disease, can cause Ubrelvy to build up in your body. This can increase your risk for side effects from the drug. If you have kidney problems, talk with your doctor about whether Ubrelvy is right for you. If you have severe kidney problems, your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of Ubrelvy than usual. But if you have end stage kidney disease, Ubrelvy is not usually recommended.
  • Liver problems. Your liver helps to remove Ubrelvy from your body. If your liver doesn’t function well due to liver disease, Ubrelvy can build up in your body. This can increase your risk for side effects from the drug. If you have severe liver problems, your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of Ubrelvy than usual for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Ubrelvy is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Ubrelvy and pregnancy” section below.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Ubrelvy is safe to take while breastfeeding. For more information, see the “Ubrelvy and breastfeeding” section below.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Ubrelvy, see the “Ubrelvy side effects” section above.

It’s not known if Ubrelvy is safe to take during pregnancy. This drug hasn’t been studied in women who are pregnant. When high doses of Ubrelvy were given to pregnant females in animal studies, the drug caused some harmful effects in pregnant females and offspring. But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor before taking Ubrelvy.

It’s not known if Ubrelvy is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Ubrelvy.

For more information about taking Ubrelvy during pregnancy, see the “Ubrelvy and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Ubrelvy is safe to take while breastfeeding. The drug hasn’t been studied in women who are breastfeeding. For this reason, it’s not known if Ubrelvy passes into breast milk or whether it may affect a child who is breastfeeding. child who is breastfed. In animal studies, Ubrelvy did pass into breast milk. But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you’re breastfeeding or if you plan to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before taking Ubrelvy.

Do not use more Ubrelvy than your doctor recommends. For some drugs, doing so may lead to unwanted side effects or overdose.

What to do in case you take too much Ubrelvy

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Ubrelvy from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Ubrelvy tablets should be stored at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C). If needed, the tablets can be kept at a temperature of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) for short periods.

Keep Ubrelvy tablets in a tightly sealed container, away from light. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Ubrelvy and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.