Vyvanse is a brand-name prescription medication. It’s FDA-approved to treat the following conditions:*

* Vyvanse is not FDA-approved for weight loss or treatment of obesity.

Is Vyvanse a stimulant?

Yes, Vyvanse is a stimulant medication. It contains the active drug lisdexamfetamine dimesylate, which is a type of drug called an amphetamine.

Vyvanse is a controlled substance. It’s classified by the FDA as a Schedule II controlled drug.

This means it has a high potential for misuse. It also has a high risk of causing dependence (meaning your body needs the drug to function normally).

There are special rules around how Vyvanse is prescribed and dispensed. It’s important to keep it in a safe place to prevent misuse. And it’s illegal to give or sell Vyvanse to someone for whom it’s not prescribed.

Drug details

Vyvanse comes in the following forms that are taken by mouth:

  • chewable tablet, which is available in strengths of 10 milligrams (mg), 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg, 50 mg, and 60 mg
  • capsule, which is available in strengths of 10 mg, 20 mg, 30 mg, 40 mg, 50 mg, 60 mg, and 70 mg

Vyvanse is taken once per day.

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Vyvanse, see the “Vyvanse uses” section below.

Vyvanse is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Vyvanse contains the active drug lisdexamfetamine dimesylate.

The Vyvanse dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Vyvanse to treat
  • other medical conditions you may have
  • how well your kidneys work
  • other medications you may take

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Vyvanse comes in the following forms that are taken by mouth:

  • chewable tablet, available in strengths of 10 milligrams (mg), 20 mg, 30, mg, 40 mg, 50, mg, and 60 mg
  • capsule, available in strengths of 10 mg, 20 mg, 30, mg, 40 mg, 50, mg, 60 mg, and 70 mg

Dosage for binge eating disorder (BED)

For adults, the typical starting dosage for binge eating disorder (BED) is 30 mg taken once every morning.

Your doctor may increase your dose by 20 mg each week until you reach the dose that’s right for you. The recommended dosage range for BED is 50 mg to 70 mg taken once every morning. The maximum recommended dosage is 70 mg taken once every morning.

Dosage for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

For adults and for children ages 6 years and older, the typical starting dosage for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is 30 mg taken once every morning.

Your doctor may increase your dose by 10 mg to 20 mg each week until you reach the dose that’s right for you. The maximum recommended dosage is 70 mg taken once every morning.

Children’s dosage

Vyvanse is approved to treat ADHD in children ages 6 years and older. The recommended dosage is the same as for adults. To learn more, see the section directly above.

Vyvanse is not approved to treat binge eating disorder in children.

Dosage questions

Below are answers to some common questions you may have about taking Vyvanse.

What are the signs of having a Vyvanse dose that’s too high?

If your Vyvanse dose is too high, it may increase your risk for side effects. See the “Vyvanse side effects” section below to learn more about possible side effects of the drug.

A dose that’s too high could also cause symptoms of an overdose. To read more about the symptoms of an overdose, see the “Vyvanse overdose” section below.

If you think your Vyvanse dose is too high, talk with your doctor. They may need to lower your dosage.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Vyvanse in the morning, skip that dose and follow your usual schedule. Avoid taking a dose of Vyvanse in the afternoon. Doing so may cause trouble getting to sleep at night. Don’t try to make up for a missed dose by taking a double dose the next morning. Doing so can cause serious side effects, such as a fast or irregular heartbeat or increased blood pressure.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

You might need to. Your doctor will have you taper off Vyvanse from time to time to see if your symptoms return. This is sometimes called a treatment holiday. If your symptoms come back or worsen, you may need to keep taking Vyvanse. You should always follow your doctor’s instructions for taking this drug.

Vyvanse can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Vyvanse. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Vyvanse, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Vyvanse, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Vyvanse can include:

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Vyvanse. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Vyvanse’s Medication Guide.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Vyvanse aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.
Vyvanse has a boxed warning from the FDA regarding this side effect. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.
‡ For more information about this side effect, see “Side effects in children” below.

Side effects in children

Vyvanse is used to treat ADHD in children ages 6 years and older. In clinical studies, most side effects of Vyvanse seen in children were similar to those seen in adults taking the drug. These are listed above and described in the “Side effect details” section below.

However, certain side effects may be more common in children taking this drug than in adults. These side effects are described below.

Weight loss in children

Children who take Vyvanse are more likely to have a decrease in appetite than adults who take this drug. They are also more likely to have weight loss than adults. Over time, this can lead to slowed growth in children.

In children ages 6 to 12 years who took Vyvanse every day for a year in clinical studies, weight loss led to slowed growth. This was assessed using growth charts that compare average body weight in children of the same sex and age. Before treatment, children in the study were, on average, in the 70th percentile for body weight. After taking Vyvanse for 1 year, these children were, on average, in the 47th percentile for body weight.

Children who take Vyvanse should have their height and weight regularly checked by their doctor. If your child’s growth is affected by this drug, their doctor may suggest taking a break from treatment. This will allow your child’s growth to catch up. To learn more about weight loss associated with Vyvanse, see “Weight loss” under “Side effect details” below.

Effects on personality in children

Vyvanse can sometimes cause irritability, anger, or mood changes in children. In clinical studies of children ages 6 to 12 years with ADHD:

  • 10% of children who took Vyvanse experienced irritability
  • 3% of children who took Vyvanse had mood changes

Neither of these side effects occurred in children taking a placebo in the studies. It’s not known how often irritability or mood changes occur in older children taking Vyvanse.

If your child seems irritable or angry, or has mood changes or emotional breakdowns (intense emotional distress) while taking Vyvanse, talk with their doctor. They can help you find ways to manage their symptoms, or they may suggest switching your child to a different drug.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Vyvanse. However, it’s not known how often this may have occurred in clinical studies. Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Vyvanse, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Weight loss

Vyvanse may cause a decreased appetite or loss of appetite. For some people, this can lead to weight loss over time.

In clinical studies of ADHD, weight loss occurred in:

  • 3% to 4% of adults who took Vyvanse
  • 9% of children who took Vyvanse
  • 0% to 1% of adults and children who took a placebo (treatment containing no active drug)

After 4 weeks of treatment, the average weight loss in people who took Vyvanse was:

  • 2.8 pounds (lb) to 4.3 lb (1.3 kilograms [kg] to 2 kg) in adults
  • 2.7 lb to 4.8 lb (1.2 kg to 2.2 kg) in children ages 13 to 17 years
  • 0.9 lb to 2.5 lb (0.4 kg to 1.1 kg) in children ages 6 to 12 years

The amount of weight lost depended on dose, with more weight loss seen in people who took higher doses of Vyvanse.

In comparison, people who took a placebo in these studies tended to gain weight. After 4 weeks of treatment, the average weight gain was:

  • 0.5 lb (0.2 kg) in adults
  • 2 lb (0.9 kg) in children ages 13 to 17 years
  • 1 lb (0.4 kg) in children ages 6 to 12 years

To learn about weight loss in adults who took Vyvanse for binge eating disorder, see the drug’s prescribing information.

If you’re concerned about weight loss with Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. For more information about weight loss in children, see the “Side effects in children” section above.

Note: Although Vyvanse can cause weight loss, it shouldn’t be taken specifically for weight loss or to treat obesity. It’s not FDA-approved or recommended for this use because of the risk of serious side effects.

Effects on personality

Vyvanse can sometimes have a temporary effect on personality, causing changes in a person’s thoughts or behavior. For instance, Vyvanse can sometimes cause irritability, anger, or mood changes, particularly in children. (See the “Side effects in children” section above to learn more about this side effect in children.)

In rare instances, stimulants such as Vyvanse can cause or worsen serious mental health conditions. These include psychosis or mania in children and adults.

In clinical studies involving different types of stimulants:

  • 0.1% of people who took stimulants had psychotic or manic symptoms
  • 0% of people who took a placebo (a treatment containing no active drug) had psychotic or manic symptoms

Symptoms of psychosis can include hallucinations, paranoia, and delusions (believing things that aren’t true). Symptoms of mania can include severe insomnia (trouble sleeping), racing thoughts, impulsive or reckless behavior, and extreme levels of happiness, excitement, or activity.

If you or your child have any of these symptoms or other changes in thoughts or behavior while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor right away. They may recommend stopping Vyvanse.

Crashing

A Vyvanse crash refers to side effects that can happen when the effects of Vyvanse start to wear off. These are also known as withdrawal symptoms. They may include:

It’s not known how often crashing may occur in people who take Vyvanse. Some people who take Vyvanse in the morning may have these symptoms toward the end of the day. However, Vyvanse is a long-acting stimulant that lasts all day to treat symptoms. It’s less likely to cause a crash than short-acting stimulants that wear off after a few hours.

If you find the effects of Vyvanse wear off too soon or you have symptoms of crashing, talk with your doctor. They may suggest ways to manage this, or they may recommend a different treatment.

Headache

Vyvanse may cause headaches in some people who take this drug. Headaches are common side effects of stimulant drugs such as Vyvanse.

In clinical studies, 1% of adults who took Vyvanse stopped treatment because of headaches. It’s not known how often headaches may have occurred in children or adults who took a placebo in these studies.

If you have bothersome headaches while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor about ways to manage them. You can typically take acetaminophen (Tylenol) to treat a headache while taking Vyvanse.

Anxiety

Some people may have anxiety while taking Vyvanse. In clinical studies, anxiety was reported in:

  • 5% to 6% of adults who took Vyvanse, depending on the condition being treated
  • 0% to 1% of adults who took a placebo (a treatment containing no active drug)

It’s not known how often anxiety may have occurred in children who took Vyvanse in clinical studies.

If you have anxiety while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They can suggest ways to help manage this side effect.

Misuse

Vyvanse is a stimulant medication that has a high risk of drug misuse.* Drug misuse is taking a drug for a nonmedical use, or in a way that’s not approved. This is typically done to produce a “high.” Drug misuse typically involves using higher doses of a drug than are prescribed for medical uses.

Vyvanse use also has a high risk of physical and psychological dependence, meaning you need the drug to function normally. As a result, people may try to get Vyvanse illegally.

Vyvanse may have a lower risk of misuse than some other stimulant drugs. This is because it doesn’t work until it’s been activated in your body. Vyvanse doesn’t have a fast or intense effect, unlike some other stimulants.

However, you should keep Vyvanse in a safe place, such as a locked cabinet, to help prevent other people from misusing this drug. It’s illegal to give or sell Vyvanse to someone who doesn’t have a prescription for it. Misuse of Vyvanse can cause serious side effects, including heart problems and, in some cases, death.

It’s not known how often misuse or dependence may occur in people who take Vyvanse as prescribed for ADHD or binge eating disorder.

You should Vyvanse exactly as your doctor prescribes it. Don’t take a higher dose, take it more often, or take it for longer than prescribed. If you’ve ever misused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription drugs, or illegal drugs, tell your doctor before taking Vyvanse.

* Vyvanse has a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Vyvanse, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed below are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Alternatives for binge eating disorder (BED)

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat binge eating disorder (BED) include:

Alternatives for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) include:

You may wonder how Vyvanse compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Vyvanse and Adderall are alike and different.

Ingredients

Vyvanse contains lisdexamfetamine, which is an inactive prodrug. A prodrug is a medication that is inactive until it’s chemically altered by your body. Lisdexamfetamine is inactive until your blood cells change it into the active drug dextroamphetamine.

Adderall contains a mixture of different forms of amphetamine and dextroamphetamine. These forms are amphetamine aspartate, amphetamine sulfate, dextroamphetamine saccharate, and dextroamphetamine sulfate.

Vyvanse and Adderall are both stimulant medications.

Uses

Here is a list of conditions that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Vyvanse and Adderall to treat.

* For this use, Vyvanse is approved for people ages 6 years and older. Adderall is approved for people ages 3 years and older, and Adderall XR is for people ages 6 years and older.

Drug forms and administration

Vyvanse is a long-acting drug. It comes in the following forms, which are taken once per day in the morning:

  • chewable tablet
  • capsule

Adderall comes in the following forms:

  • Adderall immediate-release tablet (this is a short-acting form that’s taken one to three times per day)
  • Adderall XR extended-release capsule (this is a long-acting form that’s taken once per day in the morning)

Side effects and risks

Vyvanse and Adderall both contain a stimulant drug. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with either Vyvanse or Adderall, as well as mild side effects that both drugs may share.

Serious side effects

This list contains examples of serious side effects that can occur with both Vyvanse and Adderall, as well as serious side effects that both drugs may share.

* Both Vyvanse and Adderall have a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Vyvanse and Adderall are used to treat is ADHD.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, studies have found both Vyvanse and Adderall to be effective for treating ADHD.

Vyvanse and Adderall are both stimulants. This type of medication is among the choice of drugs that doctors prescribe for ADHD. The choice of which stimulant is most suitable may vary from person to person. It typically depends on factors such as how the drug is taken and how long its effects last.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Vyvanse generally costs significantly more than Adderall. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Vyvanse and Adderall are both brand-name drugs. Vyvanse isn’t currently available in generic form. Generic forms of Adderall are available. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

As with Adderall (above), you may wonder how Vyvanse compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here’s a look at how Vyvanse and Concerta are alike and different.

Ingredients

Vyvanse contains lisdexamfetamine, which is an inactive prodrug. (A prodrug is a medication that is inactive until it’s chemically altered by your body.) Your body metabolizes, or breaks down, lisdexamfetamine into the active drug dextroamphetamine after Vyvanse is absorbed into your bloodstream.

Concerta contains the active drug methylphenidate.

Vyvanse and Concerta are both stimulant medications.

Uses

Here is a list of conditions that the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Vyvanse and Concerta to treat.

Drug forms and administration

Vyvanse and Concerta are both long-acting drugs that are taken once per day in the morning.

Vyvanse comes as a chewable tablet and a capsule. People who have trouble swallowing can open the capsule and mix the powder inside with yogurt, water, or orange juice.

Concerta comes as an extended-release tablet. This must be swallowed whole.

Side effects and risks

Vyvanse and Concerta both contain a stimulant drug. Therefore, these medications can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with either Vyvanse or Concerta, as well as mild side effects that both drugs may share.

  • Can occur with Vyvanse:
    • few unique mild side effects
  • Can occur with Concerta:
    • few unique mild side effects
  • Can occur with both Vyvanse and Concerta:
    • diarrhea
    • headache
    • abdominal (belly) pain
    • nausea and vomiting
    • dizziness
    • dry mouth

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with either Vyvanse or Concerta, as well as serious side effects that both drugs may share.

* Both Vyvanse and Concerta have a boxed warning for this side effect. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Effectiveness

The only condition both Vyvanse and Concerta are used to treat is ADHD.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies. However, studies have found both Vyvanse and Concerta to be effective for treating ADHD.

Vyvanse and Concerta are both stimulants. This type of medication is among the first choice of drugs that doctors prescribe for ADHD. The choice of which stimulant is most suitable may vary from person to person. It typically depends on factors such as how the drug is taken and how long its effects last.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Vyvanse generally costs less than Concerta. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Vyvanse and Concerta are both brand-name drugs. Vyvanse isn’t currently available in generic form. Generic forms of Concerta are available. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

Vyvanse is used to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). It’s also used for binge eating disorder (BED).

With both ADHD and BED, there seem to be changes in brain chemistry that may lead to the symptoms of these conditions.

What Vyvanse does

Vyvanse is a type of drug called a stimulant. Stimulants increase activity in your brain and other body systems. They make you more alert and focused.

It’s not fully understood how Vyvanse works in ADHD or BED. However, the drug is known to increase the levels of neurotransmitters called dopamine and norepinephrine in your brain.

Neurotransmitters are natural body chemicals that help your nerve cells communicate. Dopamine and norepinephrine are released in various nerve pathways in your brain. These include those associated with thinking, emotions, behavior, appetite, and self-control.

Vyvanse increases the amount of dopamine and norepinephrine released in your brain. In ADHD and BED, this may improve communication between nerve cells in areas of the brain that may be underactive. And this may improve symptoms of these conditions.

With ADHD, Vyvanse can improve your ability to focus, concentrate, and think. And this in turn can reduce hyperactivity and impulsive behavior.

With BED, Vyvanse can reduce obsessive and compulsive thoughts about binge eating, as well as appetite itself. And it can reduce the number of binge eating episodes you have.

How long does it take Vyvanse to work?

For ADHD, Vyvanse starts working to improve focus, attention, and behavior about 1 hour after taking a dose. For BED, you may notice the effects of Vyvanse about 1 hour after taking a dose. But you’ll likely need to take it for a few weeks before the drug starts to improve your condition.

Vyvanse contains lisdexamfetamine, which is a prodrug. (A prodrug is a medication that isn’t active until it’s chemically altered by your body.) Lisdexamfetamine is inactive until your blood cells change it into the active drug dextroamphetamine.

How long does Vyvanse last in your system?

It typically takes about 2 to 3 days before Vyvanse is fully cleared from your system. However, this may vary depending on your age, weight, genetics, kidney function, or other medications you may be taking.

The effects of Vyvanse typically last for about 10 to 12 hours after you take a dose. After the effects of Vyvanse have worn off, the levels of Vyvanse in your body continue to decrease.

Vyvanse has a half-life of about 12 hours. A drug’s half-life is the amount of time it takes for your body to remove half a dose of medication from your system. After you take a dose of Vyvanse, it takes about 12 hours for the amount of active drug in your body to decrease by half.

How long does it take for Vyvanse to peak in your system?

After you take a dose of Vyvanse, the level of the active drug in your blood gradually increases until it reaches a peak. At this peak blood level, you get the maximum effect of the dose.

The peak blood level of Vyvanse is reached about 3.5 hours after taking the Vyvanse capsule on an empty stomach. The peak level is reached about 4.4 hours after taking the Vyvanse chewable tablet on an empty stomach.

If you take Vyvanse with food, it takes about an hour longer to reach peak levels in your blood.

How long does Vyvanse stay in your urine?

Vyvanse is mainly removed from your body through your urine. The drug can be detected in your urine for about 2 to 3 days after you stop taking it.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Vyvanse to treat certain conditions. Vyvanse may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Vyvanse for binge eating disorder (BED)

Vyvanse is FDA-approved to treat moderate to severe binge eating disorder (BED) in adults. BED is an eating disorder that involves repeated episodes of extreme overeating. It often occurs alongside other mental health conditions, such as anxiety or depression.

With BED, episodes of overeating tend to occur in response to emotional or mental health issues. Symptoms of BED may include:

  • eating excessive amounts of food in a short time
  • eating when you’re not hungry
  • binge eating in secret
  • feeling unable to stop eating during a binge
  • feeling guilty or ashamed about your eating

People with BED don’t try to reverse episodes of overeating by vomiting, using laxatives, fasting, or exercising.

BED is considered moderate if you have four to seven episodes of binge eating per week. It’s considered severe if you have 8 to 13 episodes per week.

Vyvanse is a stimulant medication. It can help reduce the number of binge eating episodes you have. It’s typically used alongside psychotherapy. Psychotherapy can help you understand and control the thoughts, feelings, or behaviors that trigger your episodes of overeating.

Note: Vyvanse reduces appetite and can cause weight loss. However, it’s not FDA-approved or recommended for weight loss or to treat obesity. To learn more about weight loss associated with Vyvanse, see the “Vyvanse side effects” section above.

Effectiveness for binge eating disorder (BED)

Clinical studies found Vyvanse to be effective for reducing binge eating episodes in adults with moderate to severe binge eating disorder (BED).

In these studies, people took Vyvanse or a placebo (a treatment containing no active drug) for 12 weeks. The following results were seen after 12 weeks of treatment as compared with before treatment:

  • people who took Vyvanse had, on average, 3.87 to 3.92 fewer binge days* per week
  • people who took a placebo had, on average, 2.26 to 2.51 fewer binge days per week

In another study, adults took Vyvanse for 12 weeks. Those who responded to Vyvanse (people with 1 or fewer binge days per week for 4 weeks in a row) were then split into two groups.

One group kept taking Vyvanse for another 26 weeks. The other group switched to a placebo for 26 weeks. After this time, researchers assessed how many people’s BED had relapsed (gotten worse or returned). A relapse was defined as having 2 or more binge days each week for 2 weeks in a row. Those who took Vyvanse were much less likely to relapse than those who took a placebo.

* A binge day is a day with at least one episode of binge eating.

Vyvanse for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)

Vyvanse is FDA-approved to treat ADHD in adults and in children ages 6 years and older.

Vyvanse is a stimulant medication for ADHD. It helps people with ADHD focus, concentrate, and control their behavior. It’s typically used alongside behavioral therapy for this condition.

About ADHD

ADHD is one of the most common mental health conditions that affect children. But it can also last into adulthood. In fact, ADHD isn’t diagnosed until adulthood in some people.

Symptoms of ADHD can include:

  • Hyperactivity. People who are hyperactive find it hard to be still and calm. They may fidget, move around, or talk excessively.
  • Impulsivity. People who are impulsive act without thinking first. They may do inappropriate, or sometimes dangerous, things without thinking about the consequences.
  • Inattention. People with inattention have trouble concentrating and paying attention. These problems can cause them to lose focus quickly, be easily distracted, or make careless mistakes.

Because of these symptoms, people with ADHD may have trouble making friends or forming relationships. And they may struggle at school, at work, or in social situations.

Effectiveness for ADHD

Multiple clinical studies have found Vyvanse to be effective for treating ADHD.

For example, studies have compared Vyvanse with a placebo (a treatment containing no active drug) in different age groups. Researchers measured the effect of treatment using a scale called the ADHD Rating Scale (ADHD-RS). This scale has a minimum score of 0 and a maximum score of 54. Higher scores mean more severe ADHD symptoms.

In 4-week clinical studies, the average ADHD-RS score was reduced by:

  • 18.3 to 26.7 in children ages 6 to 17 who took Vyvanse, depending on their dose
  • 16.2 to 18.6 in adults who took Vyvanse, depending on their dose
  • 6.2 to 12.8 in children ages 6 to 17 who took a placebo
  • 8.2 in adults who took a placebo

Vyvanse was also effective in longer studies in adults and children. To learn more, see Vyvanse’s prescribing information.

Vyvanse and children

Vyvanse is used to treat ADHD in children ages 6 years and older. It’s not prescribed for any other uses in children. See the section directly above to learn about the drug’s effectiveness for treating ADHD in children.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Vyvanse.

How can you intensify Vyvanse in your body?

Vyvanse doesn’t have a fast or intense effect, unlike some other stimulants. Since Vyvanse is a prodrug, it doesn’t work until it’s been metabolized in your body, which doesn’t happen right away.

You shouldn’t try to intensify the effect of Vyvanse in your body. Misuse of Vyvanse can have serious side effects, including heart problems and, in some cases, death. For more information, see “Serious side effects” in the “Vyvanse side effects” section above.

Can you take Vyvanse by snorting it?

No, you shouldn’t take Vyvanse by snorting it. This is not an approved way to take Vyvanse.

Some people who misuse Vyvanse may take it by snorting it. Misuse of Vyvanse can lead to serious side effects, including heart problems and, in some cases, death. For more information, see “Serious side effects” in the “Vyvanse side effects” section above.

Are side effects of Vyvanse different in females than they are in males?

No, side effects of Vyvanse are typically the same in both females and males.*

The only side effects specific to females are related to using the drug during pregnancy or while breastfeeding. Vyvanse can have harmful effects if used when pregnant or breastfeeding. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse and pregnancy” and “Vyvanse and breastfeeding” sections below.

* Use of the terms “female” or “male” within this article refers to a person’s sex assigned at birth.

Is Vyvanse used for depression?

Yes. Vyvanse may sometimes be used to treat depression. Several studies have looked at the use of stimulants such as Vyvanse for people with depression. In particular, stimulants have been studied as an add-on treatment for treatment-resistant depression. (This is depression that hasn’t improved with antidepressant medications.)

The research has shown conflicting results. Some studies have suggested Vyvanse may be helpful, while others found no benefit. One review of studies found that Vyvanse may ease symptoms of depression. But it also confirmed that more research is needed.

Doctors might prescribe Vyvanse off-label for treatment-resistant depression. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

If you’re interested in taking Vyvanse for depression, talk with your doctor.

Will Vyvanse make me feel ‘high’?

No. When taken at approved doses to treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder or binge eating disorder, Vyvanse doesn’t usually cause a feeling of being “high.”

However, some people who misuse stimulants such as Vyvanse may have feelings of increased energy, excitement, self-confidence, or euphoria (an exaggerated feeling of well-being).

Drug misuse* involves taking a drug for nonmedical purposes, or in a way that’s not approved. It typically involves using higher doses of a drug than doctors prescribe. Misuse of Vyvanse can cause serious side effects, including heart problems and, in some cases, death. For more information, see “Serious side effects” in the “Vyvanse side effects” section above.

* Vyvanse has a boxed warning for misuse and dependence. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Is Vyvanse a narcotic?

No, Vyvanse isn’t a narcotic. Vyvanse is a prescription stimulant medication.

Some people refer to all illegal drugs or drugs that are misused as narcotics. But according to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA), the term “narcotic” refers to opioid or opiate drugs. These are drugs made from the opium poppy. They include illegal drugs, such as heroin, and strong prescription pain relievers, such as morphine (Kadian, MS Contin) and oxycodone (Oxycontin, Percocet).

Can I drive while I’m taking Vyvanse?

Yes, you can likely drive while taking Vyvanse. However, some people may have certain side effects that could make it unsafe to drive. These may include dizziness and feeling jittery or anxious. Make sure you know how Vyvanse affects you before driving. And drive only if you feel it’s safe to do so.

How will my doctor monitor my health during Vyvanse treatment?

Your doctor will do various checks to monitor your health while you take Vyvanse.

Vyvanse can sometimes cause a fast heartbeat or increase your blood pressure. Your doctor will check your blood pressure and heart rate regularly while you take Vyvanse. Call your doctor right away if you have signs of a heart problem while taking Vyvanse. These may include new or worsening chest pain, fainting, or a feeling like your heart is pounding, racing, or skipping a beat.

Vyvanse can also reduce your appetite, which can lead to weight loss over time. Children taking Vyvanse should have their weight and height checked regularly by their doctor during treatment.

Vyvanse can have other side effects, including mental health conditions and circulation problems. Your doctor may ask you about possible symptoms of these at each appointment. See the “Vyvanse side effects” section above to learn about other possible side effects you may need to discuss with your doctor.

Is it safe to take birth control with Vyvanse?

It’s not known if Vyvanse is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Vyvanse.

For more information about taking Vyvanse during pregnancy, see the “Vyvanse and pregnancy” section below.

Taking Vyvanse can lead to drug dependence. It’s possible to become both psychologically and physically dependent on this drug. With psychological dependence, you feel unable to stop using a drug. With physical dependence, your body needs the drug to function normally. And you may have withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop taking it.

Drug dependence can make it hard to stop taking Vyvanse. And it can sometimes cause people to try to get Vyvanse illegally.

Drug dependence is more likely to occur with misuse* of Vyvanse. Misuse involves taking a drug for nonmedical purposes, or taking it in a way that’s not approved. And it typically involves using higher doses of a drug than doctors prescribe. Misuse of Vyvanse can cause serious side effects, including heart problems and, in some cases, death.

You can also develop a tolerance to Vyvanse. This can lead to a desire for larger or more frequent doses.

* Vyvanse has a boxed warning for misuse and dependence. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Withdrawal symptoms

If you’ve been taking high doses of Vyvanse for a long time, you may have withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop taking the drug. This is sometimes called a Vyvanse crash.

Withdrawal symptoms may include:

If you want to stop taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor about the best way to do this. They may recommend that you slowly stop taking the medication to help avoid withdrawal symptoms.

You should avoid drinking alcohol while you’re taking Vyvanse. Vyvanse can mask the effects of alcohol in your body. This can make it hard for you to know how much you’ve had to drink.

If you have certain side effects with Vyvanse, such as nausea, dizziness, or diarrhea, drinking alcohol could make them worse.

If you’ve ever misused or been dependent on alcohol, you could be more likely to misuse* or become dependent on Vyvanse. Talk with your doctor about whether Vyvanse is right for you.

If you have questions about drinking alcohol while taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* Vyvanse has a boxed warning for misuse and dependence. A boxed warning is the strongest warning the FDA requires. It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Vyvanse can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements and certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Vyvanse and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Vyvanse. This list doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with Vyvanse.

Before taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Vyvanse and MAOIs

You shouldn’t take Vyvanse with drugs called monoamine oxidase inhibitors (MAOIs). Taking Vyvanse with MAOIs can cause a dangerous increase in blood pressure.

Both Vyvanse and MAOIs can also increase your serotonin levels. Taking these drugs together can raise your risk for a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse and drugs that increase serotonin levels” section below.

MAOI drugs you shouldn’t take with Vyvanse include:

  • the antibiotic linezolid (Zyvox)
  • a blood disorder treatment called methylene blue (ProvayBlue)
  • MAOI antidepressants, such as:
    • phenelzine (Nardil)
    • isocarboxazid (Marplan)
    • tranylcypromine (Parnate)
    • selegiline (Emsam)

Do not take Vyvanse if you’ve taken an MAOI drug in the last 14 days. If you currently take or have recently taken any of these drugs, talk with your doctor about different treatment options.

Vyvanse and drugs that increase serotonin levels

Vyvanse may interact with drugs that increase the level of serotonin in your body. Serotonin is a chemical in your body that affects mood, digestion, and sleep.

Vyvanse raises the level of serotonin in your body. If you take Vyvanse with other drugs that also have this effect, your serotonin level can rise even higher. This can raise your risk for a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. This is a dangerous condition caused by a buildup of serotonin in your body.

Examples of drugs that can raise the risk of serotonin syndrome if taken with Vyvanse include:

If you take any of these drugs, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and Lexapro

Lexapro is an SSRI antidepressant that contains the active drug escitalopram. Both Vyvanse and Lexapro can increase your serotonin levels. Taking these drugs together can raise your risk for a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse and drugs that increase serotonin levels” section above.

If you take Lexapro, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and Prozac

Prozac is an SSRI antidepressant that contains the active drug fluoxetine. Taking Vyvanse with Prozac can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body. This can raise your risk for Vyvanse side effects.

Both Vyvanse and Prozac can also increase your serotonin levels. Taking these drugs together can raise your risk for a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse and drugs that increase serotonin levels” section above.

If you take Prozac, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and Wellbutrin

Wellbutrin is an antidepressant that contains the active drug bupropion. Taking Vyvanse with Wellbutrin can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body. This can raise your risk for Vyvanse side effects.

If you take Wellbutrin, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and drugs that inhibit CYP2D6

Vyvanse may interact with drugs that inhibit CYP2D6. Vyvanse is metabolized (broken down) by CYP2D6, which is an enzyme in your liver. Certain drugs can reduce the activity of this enzyme. These are known as CYP2D6 inhibitors. If you take Vyvanse with one of these drugs, it can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body. This can raise your risk for side effects with Vyvanse.

Examples of CYP2D6 inhibitors that can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body include:

If you take any of these drugs, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and tricyclic antidepressants

Vyvanse may interact with tricyclic antidepressants. Both Vyvanse and tricyclic antidepressants can have side effects that affect your heart, such as a fast or irregular heartbeat. Taking these drugs together can raise your risk for these side effects even more.

Both Vyvanse and tricyclic antidepressants can also increase your serotonin levels. Taking these drugs together can raise your risk for a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. To learn more, see the “Vyvanse and drugs that increase serotonin levels” section above.

Examples of tricyclic antidepressants include:

If you take one of these drugs, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse. Or they may recommend alternative treatments.

Vyvanse and drugs that make urine more alkaline

Vyvanse may interact with certain drugs that can make urine more alkaline. Taking these drugs with Vyvanse can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body. This could increase your risk for Vyvanse side effects.

Examples of drugs that make urine more alkaline and can raise your risk for Vyvanse side effects include:

  • acetazolamide
  • sodium bicarbonate (baking soda)

If you take one of these drugs, your doctor may recommend different treatment options for you.

Vyvanse and drugs that make urine more acidic

Vyvanse may interact with certain drugs that can make urine more acidic. Taking these drugs with Vyvanse can lower the amount of Vyvanse in your blood and make it less effective.

Examples of drugs that make urine more acidic and can reduce the effect of Vyvanse include:

  • methenamine (Hiprex, Urex)
  • ascorbic acid (vitamin C)

If you take one of these drugs, your doctor may recommend taking a higher dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and drugs that contain caffeine

Vyvanse may interact with certain drugs that contain caffeine. Vyvanse is a stimulant medication, and caffeine is also a stimulant. Caffeine is found in certain drugs used for headache, cold and flu, or pain.

Taking medications that contain caffeine might add to the stimulant effects of Vyvanse. This can increase the risk of stimulant-related side effects such as anxiety, fast heartbeat, insomnia (trouble sleeping), feeling jittery, and others.

It’s best to avoid taking medications that contain caffeine while you’re taking Vyvanse. Your doctor or pharmacist can usually recommend a suitable alternative.

Vyvanse and herbs and supplements

Vyvanse can interact with certain herbs or supplements, including those listed below.

Vyvanse and St. John’s wort

Vyvanse may interact with an herbal supplement called St. John’s wort. This is because both St. John’s wort and Vyvanse can raise your serotonin levels.

Taking Vyvanse with St. John’s wort can raise your risk for a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. This can occur if levels of serotonin get too high in your body.

If you take St John’s wort, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and tryptophan

Vyvanse may interact with tryptophan supplements. This is because both Vyvanse and tryptophan can raise your serotonin levels.

Taking Vyvanse with tryptophan raises the risk of a serious side effect called serotonin syndrome. Serotonin syndrome can occur if levels of serotonin get too high in your body.

If you take tryptophan, talk with your doctor before taking Vyvanse. They may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.

Vyvanse and foods or beverages

Vyvanse can interact with certain food and beverages that contain caffeine.

Vyvanse and caffeine

Consuming caffeine in foods and drinks might add to the stimulant effects of Vyvanse. This can increase the risk of stimulant-related side effects such as anxiety, fast heartbeat, insomnia (trouble sleeping), feeling jittery, and others.

While taking Vyvanse, you should avoid consuming large amounts of foods or drinks that contain caffeine. Caffeine is found in foods such as chocolate. It’s also found in drinks such as coffee, certain teas, and sodas.

You may want to try decaffeinated versions of these drinks. However, if you feel you need some caffeine, talk with your doctor. They can tell you how much is safe to have while taking Vyvanse.

As with all medications, the cost of Vyvanse can vary. To find current prices for Vyvanse tablets or capsules in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for Vyvanse, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Vyvanse, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Vyvanse, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Takeda Pharmaceutical Company Limited, the manufacturer of Vyvanse, offers a savings program that may help lower the cost of the drug. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, visit the program website for:

Mail-order pharmacies

Vyvanse may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home. However, since Vyvanse is a controlled substance, this option may not be available in all areas.

Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Vyvanse isn’t available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

It’s not known if Vyvanse is safe to take during pregnancy. This medication hasn’t been studied during pregnancy.

However, Vyvanse is an amphetamine and stimulant drug. Amphetamines are known to increase the risk of certain problems if used during pregnancy. These problems include:

If you’re pregnant or planning to become pregnant, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking Vyvanse.

Breastfeeding isn’t recommended while taking Vyvanse. If taken while breastfeeding, Vyvanse may pass into breast milk. It could also affect the way your body makes breast milk.

Vyvanse may cause serious side effects in a breastfed child. These include feeding problems, slowed growth, increased blood pressure, fast heartbeat, and serious cardiovascular (heart and blood vessel) problems.

If you’re currently breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor. They may suggest that you take a medication other than Vyvanse.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Vyvanse can lead to serious side effects.

Do not use more Vyvanse than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

You should take Vyvanse according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

When to take

Vyvanse should be taken once daily in the morning. Don’t split your dose to spread it over the day.

You shouldn’t take Vyvanse in the afternoon, because this can lead to insomnia (trouble sleeping) at night.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Vyvanse with food

You can take Vyvanse either with or without food.

Can Vyvanse be crushed, split, or chewed?

Vyvanse comes as a capsule and a chewable tablet.

Vyvanse capsules should be swallowed whole. It shouldn’t be chewed or crushed. However, if you have trouble swallowing the capsule whole, it can be split open. You should thoroughly mix the powder inside with yogurt, water, or orange juice, and take it right away.

There may be a film left in the glass or container after you take the mixture. This doesn’t contain the active drug, so this residue does not need to be taken.

Vyvanse chewable tablets should be chewed thoroughly before swallowing. The tablet shouldn’t be crushed or split.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warning: Potential for drug misuse and dependence

This drug has a boxed warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A boxed warning alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

Vyvanse is an amphetamine and stimulant medication. It has a high risk of drug abuse, which is also called drug misuse. It also has a high risk of psychological and physical dependence, meaning the person needs the drug to function normally.

Before you start taking Vyvanse, your doctor will ask you if you’ve ever misused or been dependent on alcohol, prescription drugs, or illegal drugs. They’ll also monitor you during your treatment to see if you develop any signs of misusing or becoming dependent on Vyvanse.

For more information on this side effect, see “Misuse” under the “Side effect details” section above.

Other precautions

Before taking Vyvanse, talk with your doctor about your health history. Vyvanse may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve ever had an allergic reaction to amphetamine drugs, or to Vyvanse or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Vyvanse. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Heart conditions. You shouldn’t take Vyvanse if you have a serious heart condition such as a heart defect, irregular heartbeat, or coronary artery disease. This is because Vyvanse can increase blood pressure and heart rate. In rare cases, it can also cause serious cardiovascular side effects, including heart attack, stroke, and sudden cardiac death (heart suddenly stops beating). These side effects are more likely in people with serious heart conditions. If you have a heart condition, talk with your doctor about whether Vyvanse is right for you. They may want to check your heart function before prescribing Vyvanse.
  • High blood pressure. Vyvanse can increase blood pressure. If you already have high blood pressure, Vyvanse could make your condition worse. Talk with your doctor about whether Vyvanse is right for you. Your doctor will check your blood pressure regularly while you take Vyvanse.
  • Mental health conditions. Vyvanse cancause or worsen symptoms of psychosis and mania. If you or a close family member have ever had depression, bipolar disorder, mania, or psychosis, ask your doctor if Vyvanse is right for you.
  • Circulation problems in fingers and toes. Vyvanse can cause problems with blood circulation in your fingers and toes, such as Raynaud’s phenomenon. If you already have one these problems, taking Vyvanse can make it worse. Talk with your doctor about whether Vyvanse is right for you.
  • Kidney problems. Your kidneys help remove Vyvanse from your body. If your kidneys don’t work well, this can cause Vyvanse to build up in your body. This can raise your risk for side effects. If you have kidney problems, your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of Vyvanse.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Vyvanse is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Vyvanse and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. Vyvanse passes into breast milk. You shouldn’t breastfeed while taking this drug. For more information, see the “Vyvanse and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Vyvanse, see the “Vyvanse side effects” section above.

When you get Vyvanse from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Vyvanse tablets and capsules should be stored at room temperature (68°F to 77°F or 20°C to 25°C). However, if needed, the drug can be kept at a temperature of 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C) for short periods of time. Store the tablets and capsules in a tightly sealed container away from light. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

It’s important to store Vyvanse in a safe place. This is to lower the risk of the drug being misused by someone who doesn’t have a prescription for it. To learn more, see the FDA warning in the “Vyvanse precautions” section above.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Vyvanse and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment. And it prevents potential misuse of this drug. Ask your doctor or pharmacist about a medicine take-back program in your area.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up-to-date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.