Myrbetriq is a brand-name prescription medication that’s used to treat certain bladder problems. It’s FDA-approved for:

Drug details

Myrbetriq contains the active drug mirabegron. It belongs to a class of drugs called beta-3 adrenoceptor agonists.

Myrbetriq comes in two different forms that are taken by mouth:

  • extended-release tablet, available in strengths of 25 milligrams (mg) and 50 mg
  • extended-release granules that are mixed with 100 milliliters (mL) of water to make a liquid suspension with a strength of 8 mg/mL

These dose forms aren’t interchangeable.

Myrbetriq tablets can be used in adults and children ages 3 years and older who weigh 35 kg (77 lb)* or more.

Myrbetriq granules can be used in children ages 3 years and older who weigh 11 kg (25 lb) or more. The granules aren’t approved for use in adults.

* One kilogram (kg) is about 2.2 pounds (lb).

Effectiveness

For information about the effectiveness of Myrbetriq, see the “Myrbetriq uses” section below.

Myrbetriq is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Myrbetriq contains the active drug mirabegron.

Myrbetriq can cause mild and serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Myrbetriq. These lists do not include all possible side effects.

For more information about the possible side effects of Myrbetriq, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be concerning or bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to notify the FDA about a side effect you’ve had with Myrbetriq, you can do so through MedWatch.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects* of Myrbetriq can include:

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Myrbetriq. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or view Myrbetriq’s patient information.
† For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Myrbetriq aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

* For more information about this side effect, see “Side effect details” below.

Side effects in children

Myrbetriq is used to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in children ages 3 years and older. NDO is an overactive bladder that’s caused by a nerve problem, such as spina bifida.

In general, side effects of Myrbetriq in children are similar to those seen in adults. These are described above and below.

But young children taking Myrbetriq may be more likely to have increased blood pressure than older children or adults taking this drug. In clinical studies, increased blood pressure was very common in children under 12 years old. See “Increased blood pressure” below to read more about this possible side effect of Myrbetriq.

If you’re considering Myrbetriq as a treatment option for your child’s condition, talk with their doctor about possible side effects.

Side effects in older people

In clinical studies, side effects of Myrbetriq reported in adults ages 65 years and older were similar to those seen in younger people.

Certain other drugs used for overactive bladder (OAB) may cause troublesome side effects in older people. These drugs are called antimuscarinics (or anticholinergics). In particular, these drugs may increase the risk of dementia in older people.

Myrbetriq isn’t an antimuscarinic drug. It’s not associated with this side effect. And it’s not known to cause more side effects in older people than in younger people.

Side effect details

Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Diarrhea

Myrbetriq can sometimes cause diarrhea, although it’s not common. Myrbetriq is more likely to cause constipation, particularly if it’s taken with solifenacin (Vesicare).

Diarrhea wasn’t specifically reported in children who took Myrbetriq in clinical studies. But gastroenteritis was reported in some children. Gastroenteritis is a stomach infection that can cause diarrhea.

With diarrhea, you pass loose or watery stools. Or you may need to pass stools urgently or more frequently than usual.

To find out how often diarrhea occurred with Myrbetriq in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

What you can do

If you have diarrhea with Myrbetriq, this can make you lose more fluids than usual. Be sure to drink plenty of fluids to avoid getting dehydrated. Taking an oral rehydration solution such as Pedialyte can also help replace lost fluids and electrolytes.

If you have diarrhea that’s troublesome or lasts longer than a few days, talk with your doctor. They may recommend medication to help stop the diarrhea.

Contact your doctor right away if you have blood in your stools or symptoms of dehydration. These may include dry mouth, thirst, dark urine, and decreased urine production. Your doctor may need to prescribe other treatments for these problems.

Kidney problems

Myrbetriq doesn’t directly cause kidney problems. It can cause UTIs and urinary retention (being unable to empty your bladder). These side effects can sometimes lead to kidney problems.

To find out how often UTIs and urinary retention occurred with Myrbetriq in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

UTIs

Myrbetriq may cause UTIs in some people. This was one of the most common side effects reported by people who took Myrbetriq in clinical studies. UTIs usually involve the lower urinary tract (urethra and bladder). But more rarely, they can spread into the upper urinary tract (ureters and kidneys). A kidney infection is a serious condition that can lead to sepsis (blood poisoning).

Symptoms of UTIs can include:

  • burning sensation when urinating
  • urinating more often than usual
  • passing urine that’s cloudy, dark brown, or contains blood (this may look pink)
  • pelvic pain in females*
  • rectal pain in males*
  • fever
  • chills
  • nausea and vomiting
  • pain in the upper back or sides

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

What you can do

If you have symptoms of a UTI while you’re taking Myrbetriq, contact your doctor right away. They’ll likely prescribe antibiotic medication to treat the infection. You might also try drinking plenty of fluids to help flush any bacteria out of your urinary tract.

To help prevent UTIs, it may be useful to drink cranberry juice on a regular basis.

Urinary retention

Some people may experience urinary retention while using Myrbetriq. But this wasn’t a common side effect in clinical studies with Myrbetriq. It’s more likely to occur in people with a bladder outlet obstruction (a condition that makes it hard for urine to flow out of your bladder, such as an enlarged prostate). It’s also more likely to occur in people taking an antimuscarinic drug such as solifenacin (Vesicare).

If urinary retention isn’t treated, it can increase the pressure in the urinary tract and damage the kidneys.

Symptoms of urinary retention can include:

  • trouble starting to urinate
  • weak urine stream
  • leaking urine
  • needing to urinate again right after you’ve finished urinating
  • discomfort or feeling of fullness in your bladder

What you can do

If you have symptoms of urinary retention while taking Myrbetriq, contact your doctor right away. They may need to place a catheter (tube) into your bladder to release the urine.

Increased blood pressure

Myrbetriq can sometimes cause increased blood pressure.

In clinical studies, this was one of the most common side effects reported in adults who took Myrbetriq on its own. (Even so, most people taking the drug on its own didn’t have this side effect.)

Increased blood pressure wasn’t reported in adults who took Myrbetriq with solifenacin (Vesicare). And it wasn’t reported in children over 12 years old. But in children under 12 years old, this side effect was very commonly reported.

To find out how increased blood pressure occurred with Myrbetriq in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

A small increase in blood pressure doesn’t usually cause a problem. But if blood pressure increases too much, it can raise the risk of heart attack and stroke.

What you can do

High blood pressure doesn’t usually have any symptoms. Your doctor will monitor your blood pressure on a regular basis to make sure Myrbetriq isn’t causing any problems.

If your blood pressure increases too much with this drug, your doctor may prescribe medication to help lower it. Or they may recommend switching to a different treatment for your bladder problem.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Myrbetriq.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (temporary warmth, redness, or deepening of skin color)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have an allergic reaction to Myrbetriq, as the reaction could become severe. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

The Myrbetriq dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Myrbetriq to treat
  • your age
  • the form of Myrbetriq you take
  • your kidney and liver function
  • body weight (for children using Myrbetriq granules)

Typically, your doctor will start you taking a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. But be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Myrbetriq comes in two different forms that are taken by mouth:

  • extended-release tablet, available in strengths of 25 milligrams (mg) and 50 mg
  • extended-release granules that are mixed with 100 milliliters (mL) of water to make a liquid suspension with a strength of 8 mg per mL (your pharmacist will typically make this suspension)

Myrbetriq tablets and granules aren’t interchangeable. You shouldn’t switch between these drug forms. And you shouldn’t use a combination of tablets and granules to make up your prescribed dose.

Dosage for overactive bladder

Adults with an overactive bladder (OAB) will be prescribed Myrbetriq tablets. There’s no recommended dosage of Myrbetriq granules for adults.

The usual starting dosage is one 25-mg tablet taken once per day. If your symptoms don’t ease after 4 to 8 weeks, your doctor may increase your dosage to 50 mg per day. This is the maximum recommended dosage.

For OAB, you may take Myrbetriq alone, or you may take it with another drug called solifenacin (Vesicare). The recommended dosage of Myrbetriq is the same in both cases.

Dosage for neurogenic detrusor overactivity

Children ages 3 years and older with neurogenic detrusor instability (NDO) may be prescribed Myrbetriq tablets or granules. NDO is an overactive bladder that’s caused by a nerve problem. The form of Myrbetriq used for NDO depends on the child’s body weight and how easy they find it to swallow tablets.

Children who weigh less than 35 kg (77 lb)* will be prescribed Myrbetriq granules. The usual dosages are described below:

  • Children weighing 11 kg (25 lb) to less than 22 kg (48 lb): The usual starting dosage is 24 mg (3 mL of suspension) taken once per day. If the child’s symptoms don’t reduce, their doctor may increase their dosage to a maximum of 48 mg (6 mL of suspension) taken once per day.
  • Children weighing 22 kg (48 lb) to less than 35 kg (77 lb): The usual starting dosage is 32 mg (4 mL of suspension) taken once per day. If the child’s symptoms don’t reduce, their doctor may increase their dosage to a maximum of 64 mg (8 mL of suspension) taken once per day.

Children who weigh 35 kg (77 lb) or more may be prescribed Myrbetriq granules or tablets. The usual dosages are described below:

  • For Myrbetriq tablets: The usual starting dosage is one 25 mg tablet taken once per day. If the child’s symptoms don’t reduce after 4 to 8 weeks, their doctor may increase their dosage to a maximum of 50 mg per day.
  • For Myrbetriq granules: The usual starting dosage is 48 mg (6 mL of suspension) taken once per day. If the child’s symptoms don’t reduce, their doctor may increase their dosage to a maximum of 80 mg (10 mL of suspension) taken once per day.

* One kilogram (kg) is about 2.2 pounds (lb).

Children’s dosage

Myrbetriq is used to treat NDO in children ages 3 years and over. The usual dosages are described above.

Myrbetriq isn’t used for any other conditions in children.

What if I miss a dose?

Try to take your dose of Myrbetriq at around the same time each day. This can help you remember it.

If you remember a missed dose within 12 hours of when you’d normally take it, take the missed dose. Then carry on with your usual dosing schedule.

If you’re more than 12 hours late taking a dose, skip that dose. Then carry on with your usual dosing schedule. Don’t take any extra doses to make up for a missed dose.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Myrbetriq is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Myrbetriq is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Myrbetriq to treat certain conditions. Myrbetriq may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label drug use means using a drug for a purpose other than what it’s been approved for by the FDA.

Myrbetriq for overactive bladder

Myrbetriq is FDA-approved to treat overactive bladder (OAB) in adults with urinary frequency, urgency, and incontinence. It may be used on its own or with another drug called solifenacin (Vesicare).

OAB is a common condition that’s also called urge incontinence. With this condition, the muscle in your bladder wall (called the detrusor muscle) contracts too often or without warning. This may happen even when your bladder isn’t full.

Possible OAB symptoms include:

  • urinating more than eight times per day
  • urinating more than once during the night
  • suddenly and urgently needing to urinate (this may be hard to control)
  • problems getting to the bathroom in time
  • urinary incontinence (leaking urine)

OAB may have no obvious cause. It’s sometimes associated with certain conditions, such as:

* Sex and gender exist on spectrums. Use of the terms “male” and “female” in this article refers to sex assigned at birth.

OAB may also result from problems with communication between your brain, nerves, and bladder. This can happen in conditions such as:

Effectiveness for overactive bladder

Myrbetriq is an effective treatment for OAB in adults. It helps reduce the number of times you urinate per day and the number of incontinence episodes you have. American Urological Association guidelines recommend Myrbetriq as a treatment option for OAB in adults.

To find out how Myrbetriq performed in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Myrbetriq for neurogenic detrusor overactivity

Myrbetriq is FDA-approved to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in children ages 3 years and older.*

NDO is a bladder disorder that’s caused by a nerve problem, such as spina bifida, multiple sclerosis, or spinal cord injury. (NDO is sometimes called neurogenic overactive bladder.) The nerve problem causes the muscle in the bladder wall (the detrusor muscle) to contract frequently or without warning. This may happen even when the bladder isn’t full.

The bladder contractions stop the bladder from being able to hold much urine. If NDO isn’t treated, pressure in the bladder can increase. This can lead to kidney damage.

Children with NDO have symptoms of urinary frequency, urgency, and incontinence, such as:

  • urinating several times per day
  • urinating during the night
  • suddenly and urgently needing to urinate (this may be hard to control)
  • problems getting to the bathroom in time
  • urinary incontinence (leaking urine)

* Myrbetriq tablets are suitable only for children who weigh at least 35 kilograms (kg), or about 77 pounds (lb). Myrbetriq granules are suitable for children who weigh 11 kg (25 lb) or more.

Effectiveness for neurogenic detrusor overactivity

Myrbetriq is an effective treatment for NDO in children. It helps to increase the amount of urine the bladder can hold and reduce the number of incontinence episodes the child has. To find out how Myrbetriq performed in clinical studies, see the drug’s prescribing information.

Myrbetriq and children

Myrbetriq is FDA-approved to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in children ages 3 years and older. NDO is an overactive bladder that’s caused by a nerve problem, such as spina bifida.

Myrbetriq tablets are suitable only for children who weigh at least 35 kg, or about 77 lb. Myrbetriq granules are suitable for children who weigh 11 kg (25 lb) or more.

Myrbetriq is not approved for any other uses in children.

Myrbetriq may be used with solifenacin (Vesicare) to treat overactive bladder (OAB) in adults. Solifenacin is a type of drug called an antimuscarinic (sometimes called an anticholinergic). It works differently than Myrbetriq.

Myrbetriq and solifenacin are both taken once per day.

According to American Urological Association guidelines, Myrbetriq may be used with other medications for treating OAB in adults.

As with all medications, the cost of Myrbetriq can vary. To find current prices for Myrbetriq tablets or granules in your area, check out GoodRx.com.


The cost you find on GoodRx.com is what you may pay without insurance. The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Keep in mind that you may be able to get a 90-day supply of Myrbetriq. If approved by your insurance company, getting a 90-day supply of the drug could reduce your number of trips to the pharmacy and help lower the cost. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor or your insurance company.

Before approving coverage for Myrbetriq, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Myrbetriq, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Myrbetriq, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Astellas Pharma US Inc., the manufacturer of Myrbetriq, offers a program called Momentum. Through this program, you can find information on ways to save on Myrbetriq. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, visit the program website.

You can also check out the Astellas Patient Assistance Program’s website to learn about other financial support options available for Myrbetriq.

Mail-order pharmacies

Myrbetriq may be available through a mail-order pharmacy. Using this service may help lower the drug’s cost and allow you to get your medication without leaving home.

If recommended by your doctor, you may be able to receive a 90-day supply of Myrbetriq, so there’s less concern about running out of the medication. If you’re interested in this option, check with your doctor and your insurance company. Some Medicare plans may help cover the cost of mail-order medications.

If you don’t have insurance, you can ask your doctor or pharmacist about online pharmacy options.

Generic version

Myrbetriq isn’t available in a generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics tend to cost less than brand-name drugs.

Other drugs are available that can treat your condition. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Myrbetriq, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label drug use is when a drug approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is used for a purpose other than what it’s approved for.

Alternatives for overactive bladder

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat overactive bladder in adults include:

  • antimuscarinic drugs (sometimes called anticholinergics), such as:
    • darifenacin (Enablex)
    • fesoterodine (Toviaz)
    • oxybutynin (Oxytrol)
    • oxybutynin chloride (Gelnique, Ditropan XL)
    • solifenacin (Vesicare)
    • tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA)
    • trospium
  • other drugs, such as:
    • onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox)

Alternatives for neurogenic detrusor overactivity

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity in children include:

  • antimuscarinic drugs (sometimes called anticholinergics), such as:
    • oxybutynin (Oxytrol)
    • oxybutynin chloride (Gelnique, Ditropan XL)
    • solifenacin (Vesicare)
    • tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA)
    • trospium
  • other drugs, such as:
    • onabotulinumtoxinA (Botox)

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Myrbetriq.

Does Myrbetriq cause weight gain or weight loss?

It’s not known to. Changes in weight or appetite weren’t reported in clinical studies of Myrbetriq.

But Myrbetriq can sometimes cause urinary retention (being unable to empty your bladder). This could lead to temporary weight gain. See “Myrbetriq side effects” above to learn more about urinary retention.

If you’re concerned about changes in your weight while taking Myrbetriq, talk with your doctor. They can try to determine the cause and suggest ways to manage this.

How long does Myrbetriq stay in your system?

After you stop taking Myrbetriq, it takes a few days for the drug to be fully removed from your body. It takes about 10 days for adults and about 5 or 6 days for children.

What happens when you’re stopping Myrbetriq treatment?

If you and your doctor decide you should stop taking Myrbetriq, you can do this right away. There’s no need to stop the medication gradually. After you stop treatment, your urinary symptoms may come back.

If you have any questions about ending your Myrbetriq treatment, talk with your doctor.

Can Myrbetriq cause dementia?

No, Myrbetriq isn’t known to cause dementia.

A class of drugs called antimuscarinics (sometimes called anticholinergics) has been found to increase the risk of dementia in older people. Like Myrbetriq, antimuscarinics are used to treat overactive bladder. But Myrbetriq isn’t an antimuscarinic, and it’s not known to have this risk.

If you have any concerns about dementia during your Myrbetriq treatment, talk with your doctor.

Will I have hair loss with Myrbetriq?

It’s not likely. Hair loss wasn’t reported in clinical studies of Myrbetriq.

If you’re concerned about hair loss while taking Myrbetriq, talk with your doctor. They can try to determine the cause and suggest ways to manage this condition.

What’s Myrbetriq’s drug classification?

Myrbetriq belongs to a class of drugs called beta-3 adrenoceptor agonists. Myrbetriq is currently the only drug available in this class.

Myrbetriq is used to treat overactive bladder (OAB) in adults. It’s also used to treat neurogenic detrusor overactivity (NDO) in children ages 3 years and older. NDO is an overactive bladder that’s caused by a nerve problem, such as spina bifida.

What happens with an overactive bladder

The muscle in the wall of your bladder is called the detrusor muscle. This muscle usually relaxes to allow your bladder to fill with urine. When you urinate, the detrusor muscle contracts to squeeze the bladder and allow urine to be released.

With OAB, the muscle in the wall of your bladder contracts frequently or without warning. This squeezes your bladder and reduces the amount of urine it can hold. It makes you need to urinate frequently and sometimes urgently, even when your bladder isn’t full. It can also cause incontinence, which is when a person leaks small or large amounts of urine.

What Myrbetriq does

Myrbetriq is a type of drug called a beta-3 adrenoceptor agonist. It works by attaching to special sites on the detrusor muscle cells called beta-3 receptors. When Myrbetriq attaches to these sites, it causes the detrusor muscle to relax.

When the muscle in your bladder wall relaxes, this allows your bladder to hold more urine. Myrbetriq helps reduce the number of times you urinate per day. It also helps decrease incontinence.

Myrbetriq has a different mechanism of action than antimuscarinic drugs. This is the main group of drugs used to treat OAB.

How long does it take for Myrbetriq to work?

Myrbetriq starts to work soon after you take your first dose. You may notice your urinary symptoms start to decrease in the first week of treatment. But the effect of Myrbetriq builds up over time. It may take 4 to 8 weeks to reach its full effect.

Myrbetriq isn’t known to interact with alcohol. But drinking alcohol could worsen certain side effects of Myrbetriq, such as dizziness or headache.

Drinking alcohol can also irritate the lining of your bladder and cause dehydration (low fluid levels). Both of these factors could increase the risk of getting a urinary tract infection (UTI) with Myrbetriq.

It’s also worth noting that drinking alcohol can increase urination. So it can often worsen the symptoms of an overactive bladder.

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor about how much is safe for you to drink while you take Myrbetriq.

You should take Myrbetriq according to a doctor’s or healthcare professional’s instructions.

Myrbetriq tablets should be swallowed whole with a drink.

Myrbetriq granules are mixed with water to make a liquid suspension. This will usually be mixed by your pharmacist. Your pharmacist will provide you with an oral syringe to measure the correct dose. They can show you how to use the oral syringe.

Before measuring a dose, be sure to shake the bottle of suspension vigorously for 1 minute. Then let it stand until the foam on top has gone. If the granules haven’t mixed well in the suspension, shake the bottle vigorously for another minute. Let the foam settle again before you measure the required dose.

When to take Myrbetriq

You should take Myrbetriq once per day. There isn’t a best time of day to take this medication. Take it at the time that suits you, and try to stick to the same time each day.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try using a medication reminder. This can include setting an alarm or timer on your phone or downloading a reminder app. A kitchen timer can work, too.

Taking Myrbetriq with food

Adults can take Myrbetriq tablets with or without food.

Children should take Myrbetriq tablets or granules with food, after a meal or snack. (The granules aren’t approved for use by adults.)

Can Myrbetriq be crushed, split, or chewed?

No, Myrbetriq tablets must not be crushed, split, or chewed. Doing so can damage their extended-release action. These tablets should be swallowed whole. This is usually easier if you take them with a drink.

If you or your child have trouble swallowing Myrbetriq tablets whole, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

Myrbetriq granules are mixed into a liquid suspension. The child should swallow their dose of suspension without chewing the granules.

Myrbetriq can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase side effects or make them more severe.

Myrbetriq and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Myrbetriq. This list does not contain all drugs that may interact with Myrbetriq.

Before taking Myrbetriq, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Types of drugs that can interact with Myrbetriq include:

  • Drugs that are metabolized (broken down) by CYP2D6. CYP2D6 is an enzyme (protein) in your liver that helps your body break down certain drugs. Myrbetriq can stop this enzyme from working correctly. Taking Myrbetriq with these drugs can increase the risk of their side effects. Examples of these drugs include:
    • desipramine (Norpramin)
    • dextromethorphan (Delsym)
    • flecainide
    • nebivolol (Bystolic)
    • propafenone (Rythmol SR)
    • thioridazine
  • Antimuscarinic drugs (sometimes called anticholinergics). Antimuscarinics are a class of drugs used to treat overactive bladder. Taking Myrbetriq with antimuscarinic drugs raises the risk of urinary retention (being unable to empty your bladder). Examples of these drugs include:
    • darifenacin (Enablex)
    • fesoterodine (Toviaz)
    • oxybutynin (Oxytrol)
    • oxybutynin chloride (Gelnique, Ditropan XL)
    • solifenacin (Vesicare)
    • tolterodine (Detrol, Detrol LA)
    • trospium
  • Digoxin (Lanoxin). Digoxin is a drug used to treat certain heart problems, such as heart failure and atrial fibrillation. Taking Myrbetriq with digoxin can increase the risk of digoxin side effects. Your doctor may prescribe a lower dose of digoxin than usual.

Myrbetriq and herbs and supplements

There aren’t any herbs or supplements that have been specifically reported to interact with Myrbetriq. But you should still check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any of these products while taking Myrbetriq.

Myrbetriq and foods

It’s important to note that children should take Myrbetriq with food. If children take Myrbetriq without food, the amount of medication that’s absorbed into their body can increase. This may raise their risk for side effects.

Adults can take Myrbetriq either with or without food.

It’s not known if Myrbetriq is safe to take during pregnancy. This medication hasn’t been studied in pregnant humans. In animal studies, fetal harm occurred when high doses of the drug were given to pregnant females. But animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you’re pregnant or plan to become pregnant, talk with your doctor before taking Myrbetriq.

It’s not known if Myrbetriq is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Myrbetriq.

For more information about taking Myrbetriq during pregnancy, see the “Myrbetriq and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Myrbetriq passes into breast milk or if it can affect a child who’s breastfed. In animal studies, Myrbetriq did pass into milk when given to lactating females.

If you’re breastfeeding or plan to breastfeed, talk with your doctor before taking Myrbetriq. Your doctor can advise on the best way to feed your child if you take Myrbetriq.

Before taking Myrbetriq, talk with your doctor about your health history. Myrbetriq may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Bladder outlet obstruction. This blockage can happen with conditions such as bladder stones, a narrowed urethra, or an enlarged prostate gland. It makes it hard for urine to flow out of your bladder. If you have bladder outlet obstruction, you may have a raised risk for urinary retention (being unable to empty your bladder) with Myrbetriq. Talk with your doctor about whether Myrbetriq is right for you.
  • High blood pressure. Myrbetriq can increase your blood pressure. If you already have high blood pressure, your doctor will check your blood pressure more often while you take Myrbetriq. If you have very high blood pressure that’s not well-managed with medication, Myrbetriq is not recommended for you. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Kidney problems. Your kidneys help remove Myrbetriq from your body. If your kidneys don’t work well, Myrbetriq could build up in your body. This could raise your risk for side effects. If you have severe kidney problems, talk with your doctor about whether Myrbetriq is right for you. If you take Myrbetriq, your doctor may prescribe a dose that’s lower than usual.
  • Liver problems. Your liver helps to break down Myrbetriq in your body. If your liver doesn’t work well, Myrbetriq could build up in your body. This could raise your risk for side effects. If you have liver problems, talk with your doctor about whether Myrbetriq is right for you. If you take Myrbetriq, your doctor may prescribe a dose that’s lower than usual.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Myrbetriq or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Myrbetriq. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Myrbetriq is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, see the “Myrbetriq and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Myrbetriq gets into breast milk. For more information, see the “Myrbetriq and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Myrbetriq, see the “Myrbetriq side effects” section above.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Myrbetriq can lead to serious side effects. Do not use more Myrbetriq than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use its online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When you get Myrbetriq from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk with your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good to use can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

Myrbetriq tablets should be stored at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C) in a tightly sealed container away from light. If needed, Myrbetriq tablets can be kept for short periods at 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C). Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Before being mixed with water to form a liquid suspension, Myrbetriq granules should be stored at a room temperature of 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C) in the original container away from light. If needed, the granules can be kept for short periods at 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C).

Your pharmacist will typically mix Myrbetriq granules into the liquid suspension for you. The mixed suspension should be stored at 68°F to 77°F (20°C to 25°C) for up to 28 days. Dispose of any suspension remaining after 28 days.

If you don’t need to use the suspension for 2 or more days, shake the bottle vigorously for 1 minute each day. This helps keep the suspension well mixed.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Myrbetriq and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information about how to dispose of your medication.

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.