Latuda is a brand-name prescription drug. It’s FDA-approved to treat the following mental health conditions:

  • Major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder. Bipolar I disorder is a type of mood disorder that involves phases of mania and depression. Latuda treats major depressive episodes. These are periods of about 14 days during which you can feel extremely sad and hopeless. The depression phase of bipolar I disorder may be referred to as bipolar depression. For this purpose:
    • Latuda may be used alone in adults as well as children ages 10 years and older.
    • Latuda may also be used with the drugs lithium or valproate in adults. In this case, Latuda is referred to as an adjunctive treatment because you take it with other medications.
  • Schizophrenia. Latuda is used to treat schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older.

Latuda drug class and form

Latuda contains the active drug lurasidone. It belongs to a class of drugs called atypical antipsychotics. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Atypical antipsychotics may be used alone or with mood stabilizers for the treatment of bipolar depression. For more information, see the “Latuda use with other drugs” section below.

Latuda isn’t part of the antidepressant drug class. However, antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) may also be used to treat bipolar depression. (Taking Latuda with antidepressants may increase your risk for neuroleptic malignant syndrome. For more information, see the “Latuda side effects” section below.)

Latuda comes as a tablet that you swallow. You’ll likely take the medication once a day. Latuda is available in five strengths: 20 mg, 40 mg, 60 mg, 80 mg, and 120 mg.

Effectiveness

To learn about the effectiveness of Latuda, see the “Latuda uses” section below.

Latuda is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form.

A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

Latuda contains the active drug lurasidone. (As the active drug, lurasidone is the ingredient that makes Latuda work.)

Latuda can cause mild or serious side effects. The following lists contain some of the key side effects that may occur while taking Latuda. These lists don’t include all possible side effects.

For more information on the possible side effects of Latuda, talk with your doctor or pharmacist. They can give you tips on how to deal with any side effects that may be bothersome.

Note: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) tracks side effects of drugs it has approved. If you would like to report to the FDA a side effect you’ve had with Latuda, you can do so through MedWatch.

The specific side effects that you experience might differ slightly depending on whether you’re taking Latuda for bipolar I disorder or schizophrenia.

Mild side effects

Mild side effects of Latuda can include:*

  • decreased ability to think clearly, make decisions, or coordinate the movement of your muscles
  • akathisia (feeling restless or feeling the urge to move around)
  • muscle stiffness or tremor
  • stuffy or runny nose
  • trouble moving or slow movements
  • insomnia (trouble sleeping)
  • vomiting
  • weight gain — see “Side effect details” below
  • sleepiness — see “Side effect details” below
  • nausea — see “Side effect details” below

Most of these side effects may go away within a few days or a couple of weeks. But if they become more severe or don’t go away, talk with your doctor or pharmacist.

* This is a partial list of mild side effects from Latuda. To learn about other mild side effects, talk with your doctor or pharmacist, or visit Latuda’s Medication Guide.

Serious side effects

Serious side effects from Latuda aren’t common, but they can occur. Call your doctor right away if you have serious side effects. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Serious side effects and their symptoms can include:

Other serious side effects, explained in more detail below in “Side effect details,” include:

* Latuda has boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

Side effects in children

Latuda is approved to treat schizophrenia in children ages 13 and older. The drug is also approved to treat bipolar depression in children ages 10 years and older.

The side effects of Latuda in children are similar to the side effects in adults. See the “Mild side effects” and “Serious side effects” sections above for more information.

Latuda has a boxed warning for the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

How long do side effects last?

Most side effects of Latuda may go away within a few weeks after starting treatment. However, some side effects, such as tardive dyskinesia, may continue with long-term use. Talk with your doctor about your risk of experiencing long-term side effects with Latuda.

Side effect details

You may wonder how often certain side effects occur with this drug. Here’s some detail on certain side effects this drug may cause.

Allergic reaction

As with most drugs, some people can have an allergic reaction after taking Latuda. But it’s not known how often allergic reactions occurred in people who took the medication.

Symptoms of a mild allergic reaction can include:

  • skin rash
  • itchiness
  • flushing (warmth and redness in your skin)

A more severe allergic reaction is rare but possible. Symptoms of a severe allergic reaction can include:

  • swelling under your skin, typically in your eyelids, lips, hands, or feet
  • swelling of your tongue, mouth, or throat
  • trouble breathing

Call your doctor right away if you have a severe allergic reaction to Latuda. Call 911 or your local emergency number if your symptoms feel life threatening, or if you think you’re having a medical emergency.

Weight gain

Latuda use may cause weight gain. In clinical studies, weight gain varied depending on the condition being treated.

Weight gain in adults

In studies of adults, they took either Latuda, olanzapine, extended-release quetiapine, or a placebo (treatment with no active drug).

Among adults who took Latuda:

  • A total of 3% gained weight.
  • They gained an average of 0.2 to 0.9 pounds (0.1 to 0.4 kilograms).
  • Between 2.4% and 4.8% had an increase of at least 7% in their body weight.

Adults who took olanzapine gained an average of 9.2 lb (4.2 kg).

Adults who took extended-release quetiapine gained an average of 4.6 lb (2.1 kg).

Among adults who took a placebo:

  • Less than 1% gained weight.
  • Some people lost between 0.04 and 0.09 lb (0.02 and 0.04 kg).
  • Some people gained an average of 0.4 lb (0.2 kg).
  • Between 0.7% and 3.3% of people had an increase of at least 7% in their body weight.

Weight gain in children

In studies of children, they took either Latuda or a placebo.

Researchers found the following in children who took Latuda:

  • A total of 7% gained weight.
  • They gained an average of 1.1 to 1.5 lb (0.5 to 0.7 kg).
  • Between 3.3% and 4% had an increase of at least 7% in their body weight.

Researchers found the following in children who took a placebo:

  • A total of 2% gained weight.
  • They gained an average of 0.4 to 1.1 lb (0.2 to 0.5 kg).
  • Between 4.5% and 5.3% had an increase of at least 7% in their body weight.

If you’re concerned about weight gain while taking Latuda, talk with your doctor. They may want to check your weight at each appointment.

Sleepiness

A common side effect of Latuda is sleepiness (drowsiness). The percentage of people who experienced sleepiness in clinical studies varied depending on the condition being treated.

In adults, sleepiness occurred in:

  • 7% to 26% of adults treated with Latuda
  • 5% to 7.1% of adults treated with a placebo

In children, sleepiness occurred in:

  • 11% to 15% of children treated with Latuda
  • 6% to 7.1% of children treated with a placebo

Feeling sleepy after you take Latuda may go away within a few weeks. If you’re concerned about sleepiness while taking the medication, talk with your doctor. They may suggest ways to help ease this side effect.

Nausea

Nausea is a common side effect of Latuda. The percentage of people who had nausea in clinical studies varied depending on the condition being treated.

In adults, nausea occurred in:

  • 7% to 17% of adults treated with Latuda
  • 5% to 10% of adults treated with a placebo

In children, nausea occurred in:

  • 13% to 16% of children treated with Latuda
  • only 3% to 6% of children treated with a placebo

If you have nausea after taking Latuda, you can ask your doctor about ways to relieve this side effect.

Tardive dyskinesia

Tardive dyskinesia, which refers to uncontrolled muscle movements, is a possible side effect of Latuda. Your risk of developing tardive dyskinesia may increase as you keep taking the medication.

In a clinical study of children with bipolar depression, the children took Latuda or a placebo for 6 weeks. Tardive dyskinesia occurred in:

  • less than 6% of children treated with Latuda
  • less than 5% of children treated with a placebo

It’s not known what percentage of children had tardive dyskinesia while taking Latuda for schizophrenia.

It’s also not known what percentage of adults in these studies had tardive dyskinesia.

Symptoms of tardive dyskinesia

Symptoms of tardive dyskinesia include involuntary, repetitive, and jerking movements of your tongue, neck, face, arms, or legs. Symptoms may occur even after you stop taking Latuda.

Talk with your doctor if you develop symptoms of tardive dyskinesia while using Latuda. They may prescribe a different medication to treat your condition.

Risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia

In some cases, antipsychotic drugs such as Latuda can increase the risk of death when used in older adults who have psychosis related to dementia.* Psychosis is a symptom of mental illness in which you lose touch with reality. And dementia refers to symptoms of problems with thinking, communication, and memory.

In clinical studies, older adults with psychosis were 1.6 to 1.7 times more likely to die after using an antipsychotic than a placebo.

If you’re an older adult and have dementia-related psychosis, you should not take Latuda. Talk with your doctor about other treatment options for your condition.

* Latuda has a boxed warning for the risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

Suicidal thoughts and behaviors

Latuda may increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults.*

In clinical studies, the number of suicidal thoughts and behaviors in children and young adults was greater when they were given medications (such as Latuda) to treat their depression. For every 1,000 people given medications to treat their depression:

  • 14 more children younger than age 18 years reported suicidal thoughts or behaviors, compared with those who took a placebo
  • 5 more people ages 18 to 24 years reported suicidal thoughts or behaviors, compared with those who took a placebo

In clinical studies, no suicides were reported among children who took medications (such as Latuda) to treat their depression. And although there were suicides among adults who took the drugs in the studies, the number was too low for researchers to reach a conclusion as to how often the suicides occurred.

Changes in mood

If you have any of the following changes in mood while using Latuda, tell your doctor right away:

But if you have any suicidal thoughts or behaviors while taking Latuda, call 911 or your local emergency number right away.

* Latuda has a boxed warning for the risk of suicidal thoughts and behaviors. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

Suicide prevention

If you know someone at immediate risk of self-harm, suicide, or hurting another person:

  • Ask the tough question: “Are you considering suicide?”
  • Listen to the person without judgment.
  • Call 911 or the local emergency number, or text TALK to 741741 to communicate with a trained crisis counselor.
  • Stay with the person until professional help arrives.
  • Try to remove any weapons, medications, or other potentially harmful objects.

If you or someone you know is having thoughts of suicide, a prevention hotline can help. The National Suicide Prevention Lifeline is available 24 hours per day at 800-273-8255. During a crisis, people who are hard of hearing can call 800-799-4889.

Click here for more links and local resources.

The Latuda dosage your doctor prescribes will depend on several factors. These include:

  • the type and severity of the condition you’re using Latuda to treat
  • your age
  • other medical conditions you may have

Typically, your doctor will start you on a low dosage. Then they’ll adjust it over time to reach the amount that’s right for you. Your doctor will ultimately prescribe the smallest dosage that provides the desired effect.

The following information describes dosages that are commonly used or recommended. However, be sure to take the dosage your doctor prescribes for you. Your doctor will determine the best dosage to fit your needs.

Drug forms and strengths

Latuda comes as a tablet that you swallow. It’s available in the following strengths: 20 milligrams (mg), 40 mg, 60 mg, 80 mg, and 120 mg.

Dosage for bipolar depression

Latuda is approved to treat major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder. The depression phase of bipolar I disorder may be referred to as bipolar depression. For this purpose, Latuda may be used:

  • alone as a single drug
  • with the drugs lithium or valproate

The dosage is the same for both uses. The typical starting dose for the treatment of bipolar depression is 20 mg once a day. The usual dose range is 20 mg to 120 mg once a day, with a maximum dose of 120 mg. You should take Latuda with food (at least 350 calories).

Your doctor may recommend a different dosage depending on several factors, including whether you have kidney or liver disease. Talk with your doctor about the dosage that’s right for you.

Dosage for schizophrenia

When used to treat schizophrenia, the typical starting dose of Latuda is 40 mg once a day. The usual dose range for adults is 40 mg to 160 mg once a day, with a maximum dose of 160 mg. You should take Latuda with food (at least 350 calories).

Your doctor may recommend a different dosage depending on several factors, including whether you have kidney or liver disease. Talk with your doctor about the dosage that’s right for you.

Pediatric dosage

For bipolar depression in children ages 10 years and older, Latuda is approved for use alone as a single drug. The typical starting dose for this use is 20 mg once a day. The usual dose range is 20 mg to 80 mg once a day, with a maximum dose of 80 mg. For bipolar depression, Latuda should be given with food (at least 350 calories).

Latuda is also approved to treat schizophrenia in children ages 13 years and older. The typical starting dose for this use is 40 mg once a day. The usual dose range is 40 mg to 80 mg once a day, with a maximum dose of 80 mg. For schizophrenia, Latuda should be given with food (at least 350 calories).

Your child’s doctor may recommend a different dosage depending on several factors, including whether they have kidney or liver disease. Talk with your child’s doctor about the dosage that’s right for them.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose of Latuda, take your missed dose as soon as you remember. If it’s almost time for your next dose, skip your missed dose and take your next dose at the usual time. Don’t “double up” on missed doses, as this can increase your risk for side effects. (For information on side effects, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.)

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Will I need to use this drug long term?

Latuda is meant to be used as a long-term treatment. If you and your doctor determine that Latuda is safe and effective for you, you’ll likely take it long term.

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approves prescription drugs such as Latuda to treat certain conditions. Latuda may also be used off-label for other conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Latuda used alone for bipolar depression

Latuda is FDA-approved to treat major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder. For this purpose, Latuda may be used alone in adults as well as children ages 10 years and older.

Bipolar I disorder is a type of mood disorder called bipolar disorder (BPD). If you have BPD, you may experience extreme shifts in activity levels, concentration, energy, and mood. Here are descriptions of some different kinds of BPD:

  • Bipolar I disorder. With this type of BPD, you have manic episodes during which you can be extremely energized and excited. Manic episodes usually last at least 7 days. You also experience depressive episodes during which you can feel extremely sad and hopeless. Depressive episodes usually last at least 14 days.
  • Bipolar II disorder. With this type of BPD, you have both manic and depressive episodes. However, manic episodes in bipolar II disorder are hypomanic (less extreme) than those in bipolar I disorder.
  • Cyclothymic disorder. With this type of BPD, you experience hypomanic episodes and depressive episodes over the course of at least 2 years. Cyclothymic disorder may also be referred to as cyclothymia.

The depression phase of bipolar I disorder may be referred to as bipolar depression.

Effectiveness when used alone for bipolar depression

Latuda has been found effective when used alone to treat bipolar depression in bipolar I disorder in adults as well as children ages 10 years and older.

Latuda in adults with bipolar depression

In a 6-week clinical study of adults, Latuda was compared with a placebo (treatment without an active drug). Researchers used the Montgomery-Asberg Depression Rating Scale (MADRS) to evaluate symptoms of bipolar depression. Scores for the MADRS range from 0 (no depression symptoms) to 60 (the maximum number of depression symptoms).

The symptoms of depression improved more in adults treated with Latuda than in adults who took a placebo:

  • Adults treated with Latuda had an average improvement of 15.4 points on the MADRS.
  • In comparison, adults who took a placebo had an average improvement of 10.7 points.

Latuda in children with bipolar depression

In a 6-week clinical study of children ages 10 years and older, Latuda was compared with a placebo. Researchers used the Children’s Depression Rating Scale Revised (CDRS-R) to evaluate symptoms of bipolar depression. Scores for the CDRS-R range from 17 to 113. A lower score means fewer symptoms.

The symptoms of depression improved more in children treated with Latuda than in children who took a placebo:

  • Children treated with Latuda had an average improvement of 21 points on the CDRS-R.
  • In comparison, children treated with a placebo had an average improvement of 15.3 points.

Latuda used as adjunctive therapy for bipolar depression

Latuda is FDA-approved to treat major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder. For this purpose, Latuda is used with the drugs lithium or valproate in adults. In this case, Latuda is referred to as an adjunctive treatment because you take it with other medications.

For information on depressive episodes and bipolar I disorder, see the section above, “Latuda used alone for bipolar depression.”

Effectiveness when used as adjunctive therapy for bipolar depression

In a 6-week clinical study, adults took Latuda with lithium or valproate, or a placebo with lithium or valproate. Researchers used the MADRS to evaluate symptoms of bipolar depression. (To learn about MADRS, see the “Latuda in adults” section above.)

The symptoms of depression improved more in adults treated with Latuda and lithium or valproate than in adults who took a placebo with lithium or valproate:

  • Adults treated with Latuda and lithium or valproate had an average improvement of 17.1 points on the MADRS.
  • In comparison, adults who took a placebo plus lithium or valproate had an average improvement of 13.5 points.

Latuda for schizophrenia

Latuda is FDA-approved to treat schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older.

Schizophrenia is a type of mental illness that’s usually diagnosed in the late teens, early 20s, or early 30s.

Symptoms of schizophrenia may include:

  • delusions (false beliefs)
  • confused speech
  • decreased expression of emotions
  • hallucinations
  • lack of motivation to plan, begin, or take part in activities
  • loss of enjoyment in everyday activities
  • strange behaviors
  • trouble concentrating
  • trouble making decisions
  • unusual thoughts

Effectiveness for schizophrenia

Latuda has been found effective for the treatment of schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older.

In several 6-week clinical studies of adults, Latuda was compared with a placebo, extended-release quetiapine, and olanzapine. Researchers used two scales to evaluate symptoms of schizophrenia:

  • Brief Psychiatric Rating Scale derived (BPRSd): Scores range from 18 to 126.
  • Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS): Scores range from 30 to 210.

A lower score means fewer symptoms. Adults who were treated with Latuda had greater improvements in their symptoms of schizophrenia. Adults treated with the medication had average improvements between:

  • 8.9 and 11 points on the BPRSd
  • 19.2 and 26.5 points on the PANSS

In comparison, adults who took a placebo had average improvements between 3.8 and 4.2 points on the BPRSd. This scale wasn’t used in studies of extended-release quetiapine or olanzapine.

The average improvements on the PANSS in these studies were:

  • 28.7 points for adults who took olanzapine
  • 27.8 points for adults who took extended-release quetiapine
  • between 10.3 and 17 points for adults who took a placebo

Off-label uses for Latuda

In addition to the uses listed above, Latuda may be used off-label for other purposes. Off-label drug use is when a drug that’s approved for one or more use(s) is prescribed for a different one that’s not approved. Below are examples of off-label uses for Latuda.

Latuda for depression

Latuda isn’t FDA-approved to treat a type of depression called major depressive disorder with mixed features (agitated depression). However, Latuda is sometimes used off-label for this purpose.

People who have this type of depression show signs of mania or hypomania that aren’t extreme enough to be considered bipolar disorder.

A clinical study has shown Latuda to be effective for this purpose. More research is needed to determine Latuda’s role in treating major depressive disorder with mixed features.

If you have questions about using Latuda for major depressive disorder with mixed features, talk with your doctor.

Latuda for bipolar 2 disorder

Latuda isn’t FDA-approved to treat bipolar 2 (II) disorder. However, the drug is sometimes used off-label for this purpose even though there is little evidence for its use in bipolar II disorder. More research is needed to determine Latuda’s role in treating this condition.

If you’re interested in using Latuda for bipolar II disorder, talk with your doctor.

Latuda for OCD

Latuda isn’t FDA-approved to treat obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). However, some clinical guidelines recommend antipsychotics like Latuda off-label for this purpose. Antipsychotics are recommended for OCD after people have tried several other treatment options first.

More research is needed to determine Latuda’s role in treating OCD.

If you have questions about using Latuda for OCD, talk with your doctor.

Latuda for major depressive disorder psychosis or agitation related to dementia

Latuda isn’t FDA-approved to treat major depressive disorder psychosis or agitation related to dementia. However, clinical guidelines recommend antipsychotics like Latuda off-label for these purposes. These drugs should be limited for use in people who have severe symptoms.

There are safety concerns when antipsychotics are used for these conditions in older adults with dementia. In fact, Latuda has a boxed warning for the risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

If you’re interested in using Latuda for major depressive disorder psychosis or agitation related to dementia, talk with your doctor.

Latuda for anxiety

Latuda isn’t FDA-approved to treat anxiety. However, Latuda may be used off-label for this purpose. One study showed that Latuda was effective for easing symptoms of anxiety. More research is needed to determine Latuda’s role in treating anxiety.

If you have bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, you may experience anxiety. Talk with your doctor about whether Latuda may help.

Latuda for sleep

Latuda isn’t FDA-approved to help with sleep. However, Latuda is sometimes used off-label for this purpose. A clinical study has shown Latuda to be effective for increasing total sleep time. More research is needed to determine Latuda’s role in sleep.

If you have bipolar disorder or schizophrenia, you may have sleep problems. Talk with your doctor about whether Latuda may help.

Latuda and children

Latuda is FDA-approved to treat major depressive episodes related to bipolar depression in children ages 10 years and older. For this purpose, Latuda may be used alone.

Latuda is also approved to treat schizophrenia in children ages 13 and older.

Other drugs are available that can treat your bipolar I disorder or schizophrenia. Some may be a better fit for you than others. If you’re interested in finding an alternative to Latuda, talk with your doctor. They can tell you about other medications that may work well for you.

Note: Some of the drugs listed here are used off-label to treat these specific conditions. Off-label use is when a drug that’s approved to treat one condition is used to treat a different condition.

Alternatives for bipolar depression

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat bipolar depression (the depressive phase in bipolar I disorder) include:

  • armodafinil (Nuvigil)
  • cariprazine (Vraylar)
  • ketamine (Ketalar)
  • lamotrigine (Lamictal)
  • modafinil (Provigil)
  • olanzapine (Zyprexa)
  • olanzapine/fluoxetine (Symbyax)
  • pramipexole (Mirapex, Mirapex ER)
  • quetiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR)
  • divalproex (Depakote, Depakote ER)

Alternatives for schizophrenia

Examples of other drugs that may be used to treat schizophrenia include:

  • aripiprazole (Abilify)
  • asenapine (Saphris)
  • brexpiprazole (Rexulti)
  • cariprazine (Vraylar)
  • chlorpromazine
  • clozapine (Clozaril)
  • fluphenazine
  • haloperidol (Haldol)
  • iloperidone (Fanapt)
  • loxapine
  • lumateperone (Caplyta)
  • olanzapine (Zyprexa)
  • paliperidone (Invega)
  • perphenazine
  • pimavanserin (Nuplazid)
  • quetiapine (Seroquel, Seroquel XR)
  • risperidone (Risperdal)
  • thiothixene
  • trifluoperazine
  • ziprasidone (Geodon)

You may wonder how Latuda compares with other medications that are prescribed for similar uses. Here we look at how Latuda and Abilify are alike and different.

Ingredients

Latuda contains the active drug lurasidone. Abilify contains the active drug aripiprazole. Both Latuda and Abilify belong to a class of drugs called atypical antipsychotics. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved both Latuda and Abilify to treat schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older.

Latuda is also FDA-approved for the treatment of major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder.

  • For this purpose, Latuda may be used alone in adults as well as children ages 10 years and older.
  • For this purpose, Latuda may also be used with the drugs lithium or valproate in adults.

Abilify is also FDA-approved for the treatment of:

Drug forms and administration

Latuda comes as a tablet that you swallow. You’ll likely take the medication once a day with a meal.

Abilify is available in several forms:

  • a tablet that you swallow
  • a tablet that dissolves in your mouth
  • an oral solution that you swallow
  • an intramuscular injection (an injection into a muscle) given by a healthcare provider

You’ll likely take Abilify once a day, with or without food.

Side effects and risks

Latuda and Abilify can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

These lists contain up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with Latuda, with Abilify, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Latuda, with Abilify, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

* Latuda and Abilify have boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

Effectiveness

Latuda and Abilify have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to treat schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies, but studies have found both Latuda and Abilify to be effective for treating schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older.

Costs

Latuda and Abilify are both brand-name drugs. Abilify is also available in generic form called aripiprazole. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Latuda tablets cost significantly more than both brand-name and generic Abilify tablets. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Like Abilify (above), the drug Vraylar has uses similar to those of Latuda. Here’s a comparison of how Latuda and Vraylar are alike and different.

Ingredients

Latuda contains the active drug lurasidone. Vraylar contains the active drug cariprazine. Both Latuda and Vraylar belong to a class of drugs called atypical antipsychotics. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

Uses

Here’s some information about the uses of Latuda and Vraylar.

Latuda uses

The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Latuda to treat:

  • schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older
  • major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder
    • For this purpose, Latuda may be used alone in adults as well as children ages 10 years and older.
    • For this purpose, Latuda may also be used with the drugs lithium or valproate in adults. In this case, Latuda is referred to as an adjunctive treatment because you take it with other medications.

Vraylar uses

Vraylar is FDA-approved to treat:

  • schizophrenia in adults
  • depressive episodes* related to bipolar I disorder in adults
  • manic and mixed episodes related to bipolar I disorder in adults

* Depressive episodes may also be known as major depressive episodes.

Drug forms and administration

Latuda comes as a tablet that you swallow. You’ll likely take the medication once a day with a meal.

Vraylar comes as a capsule that you swallow. You’ll likely take the drug once a day with or without food.

Side effects and risks

Latuda and Vraylar can cause very similar side effects, but some different ones as well. Below are examples of these side effects.

Mild side effects

This list contains up to 10 of the most common mild side effects that can occur with Latuda and Vraylar (when taken individually):

Serious side effects

These lists contain examples of serious side effects that can occur with Latuda, or with both drugs (when taken individually).

* Latuda and Vraylar have boxed warnings for these side effects. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the FDA. For more information, see “FDA warnings” at the beginning of this article.

Effectiveness

Latuda and Vraylar have different FDA-approved uses, but they’re both used to treat schizophrenia in adults and depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder in adults.

These drugs haven’t been directly compared in clinical studies, but studies have found both Latuda and Vraylar to be effective for treating the conditions mentioned right above.

Costs

According to estimates on GoodRx.com, Latuda tablets and Vraylar capsules cost about the same. The actual price you’ll pay for either drug depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Latuda and Vraylar are both brand-name drugs. There are currently no generic forms of either drug. Brand-name medications usually cost more than generics.

There are no known interactions between Latuda and alcohol. However, drinking alcohol while taking Latuda may worsen certain side effects. Examples of these side effects include:

  • decreased ability to think clearly, make decisions, or coordinate the movement of your muscles
  • sleepiness

If you drink alcohol, talk with your doctor before taking Latuda. They can advise you on whether it’s safe to keep drinking during your treatment.

You may experience withdrawal symptoms if you suddenly stop taking Latuda. Symptoms of withdrawal may include:

  • restlessness
  • uncontrolled muscle movements

It’s important that you first talk with your doctor before you stop Latuda treatment. Don’t stop taking the drug on your own.

There haven’t been studies on whether Latuda can cause drug dependence.

Latuda can interact with several other medications. It can also interact with certain supplements as well as certain foods.

Different interactions can cause different effects. For instance, some interactions can interfere with how well a drug works. Other interactions can increase the number of side effects or make them more severe.

Latuda and other medications

Below is a list of medications that can interact with Latuda. This list doesn’t contain all drugs that may interact with Latuda.

Before taking Latuda, talk with your doctor and pharmacist. Tell them about all prescription, over-the-counter, and other drugs you take. Also tell them about any vitamins, herbs, and supplements you use. Sharing this information can help you avoid potential interactions.

If you have questions about drug interactions that may affect you, ask your doctor or pharmacist.

Latuda and certain medications that affect how your body breaks down Latuda

You shouldn’t take Latuda with certain drugs that affect how your body metabolizes (breaks down) Latuda.

Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors

Strong CYP3A4 inhibitors are a type of drug that works by inhibiting (blocking) an enzyme in your body called CYP3A4. This is the enzyme your body uses to break down Latuda. Blocking CYP3A4 can raise the level of Latuda in your blood, increasing your risk for side effects. (To learn about possible side effects, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.)

The following drugs are examples of strong CYP3A4 inhibitors:

  • clarithromycin (Biaxin)
  • ketoconazole
  • ritonavir (Norvir)
  • voriconazole (Vfend)

If you use any of these drugs, talk with your doctor before taking Latuda. They may adjust your doses or recommend other medications.

Moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors

Taking Latuda with drugs called moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors can raise the level of Latuda in your blood, increasing your risk for side effects. (To learn about possible side effects, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.)

The following drugs are examples of moderate CYP3A4 inhibitors:

  • atazanavir (Reyataz)
  • diltiazem (Cardizem, Tiazac)
  • erythromycin (Ery-Tab)
  • fluconazole (Diflucan)
  • verapamil (Calan, Verelan)

If you use any of these medications, talk with your doctor before using Latuda. They may decide to decrease your dose of Latuda.

Strong CYP3A4 inducers

Strong CYP3A4 inducers are a type of drug that works by inducing (increasing) the action of an enzyme in your body called CYP3A4. This is the enzyme your body uses to break down Latuda. When CYP3A4 is too active, the level of Latuda in your blood can decrease. This might make the drug less effective.

The following drugs are examples of strong CYP3A4 inducers:

  • carbamazepine (Carbatrol, Tegretol)
  • phenytoin (Dilantin)
  • rifampin (Rifadin)

If you use any of these drugs, talk with your doctor before taking Latuda. They may want to adjust your doses or suggest other medications.

Moderate CYP3A4 inducers

Taking Latuda with drugs called moderate CYP3A4 inducers can lower the level of Latuda in your blood. This might make the medication less effective.

The following drugs are examples of moderate CYP3A4 inducers:

  • bosentan (Tracleer)
  • efavirenz (Sustiva)
  • etravirine (Intelence)
  • modafinil (Provigil)
  • nafcillin

If you’re using any of these medications, tell your doctor before you start Latuda treatment. They may decide to increase your dose of Latuda.

Latuda and herbs and supplements

Taking Latuda with St. John’s wort may cause Latuda to be less effective. Check with your doctor or pharmacist before using any herbs or supplements while taking Latuda.

Latuda and foods

Grapefruit has been specifically reported to interact with Latuda. If you have questions about eating certain foods with Latuda, talk with your doctor.

Latuda and grapefruit

You shouldn’t eat grapefruit or drink grapefruit juice while taking Latuda.

Grapefruit and grapefruit juice may raise the level of Latuda in your blood, increasing your risk for side effects. (To learn about possible side effects, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.)

Latuda and caffeine (not an interaction)

There are no known interactions between Latuda and caffeine, but caffeine can interact with other antipsychotic medications. (Latuda is a type of antipsychotic.) Caffeine may also worsen certain other conditions, including mania and anxiety.

Before you start taking Latuda, talk with your doctor about the risks of consuming caffeine during your treatment.

Here are descriptions of how bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia occur in the body, and how Latuda treats them.

Bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia explained

Bipolar I disorder is a type of mood disorder called bipolar disorder (BPD). People with BPD may experience extreme shifts in activity levels, concentration, energy, and mood.

With bipolar I disorder, you have manic episodes during which you can be extremely energized and excited. Manic episodes usually last at least 7 days. You also have depressive episodes during which you can feel extremely sad and hopeless. Depressive episodes usually last at least 14 days.

Schizophrenia is a type of mental illness that’s usually diagnosed in the late teens, early 20s, or early 30s. Symptoms can include delusions (false beliefs) and hallucinations. For more symptoms, see the “Latuda uses” section above.

Bipolar I disorder and schizophrenia are believed to be due to a chemical imbalance in the brain.

What Latuda does

Latuda is in a class of drugs called atypical antipsychotics. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.) The way atypical antipsychotics work isn’t completely understood. It’s thought that the drugs increase levels of the chemicals serotonin and dopamine in your body. These chemicals help ease symptoms of schizophrenia and the depressive phase of bipolar I disorder.

How long does it take to work?

It may take 1 to 2 weeks for Latuda to start working.

How long does Latuda stay in your system?

Latuda may stay in your system for a couple of days. However, it’s important that you don’t miss a dose so you have a consistent level of the drug in your body. You should take Latuda exactly how your doctor tells you to.

Here are answers to some frequently asked questions about Latuda.

Will I feel high while using Latuda?

No, taking Latuda shouldn’t cause a high feeling. However, feeling high may be a symptom of bipolar mania. This is a period in bipolar disorder during which you feel extremely energized and excited.

If you’re concerned about feeling high after taking Latuda, talk with your doctor. They may want to monitor you more closely for other symptoms of bipolar mania.

Does Latuda cause weight loss?

Latuda will probably not cause weight loss. Some people who take Latuda actually gain weight. For more information on weight gain during Latuda treatment, see “Weight gain” in the “Side effect details” section above.

If you’re interested in losing weight, talk with your doctor. They can review your diet and exercise routine.

Can Latuda cause sexual dysfunction?

Yes. Males who take Latuda may have erectile dysfunction (trouble getting or keeping an erection). This can be caused by a condition called hyperprolactinemia in which you have a high level of the hormone prolactin. Hyperprolactinemia is a possible side effect of Latuda. For more about possible side effects, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.

As for females, there were no reports of Latuda causing sexual dysfunction in them in clinical trials. But it’s important to note that an elevated level of prolactin (a side effect of Latuda) might be a possible cause of sexual dysfunction in females. It’s thought that a high level of prolactin decreases vaginal secretions and lubrication in females, causing sexual dysfunction.

Talk with your doctor if you’re concerned about sexual dysfunction while taking Latuda. They may be able to suggest ways to help ease the condition.

Is Latuda a narcotic?

No, Latuda isn’t a narcotic. Latuda is in a class of drugs called atypical antipsychotics. (A class of drugs is a group of medications that work in a similar way.)

A narcotic is a kind of strong pain reliever that’s also known as an opioid. An atypical antipsychotic is a type of drug called a mood stabilizer, which helps treat shifts in mood.

Mood stabilizers that were first created in the 1960s are known as first-generation mood stabilizers. Mood stabilizers that were created in the 1990s are known as second-generation (atypical) mood stabilizers.

Can I use Latuda and Adderall together?

Maybe. There are no known interactions between Latuda and amphetamine/dextroamphetamine (Adderall). However, Adderall may worsen some side effects of Latuda. And Latuda may lessen the stimulating effects of Adderall.

For more about side effects of Latuda, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.

Talk with your doctor about the possible risks of taking Latuda and Adderall together.

Will I be able to drive while taking Latuda?

Perhaps. A common side effect of Latuda is sleepiness. So you shouldn’t drive after taking Latuda until you know how the medication will affect you.

While I use Latuda, why do I have to avoid getting too hot?

Latuda may lessen your ability to keep your body temperature cool. Because of this, it’s important to avoid getting too hot while taking the medication. Developing hyperthermia (a condition in which your body temperature become too high) can be dangerous.

If you have questions about how to stay cool while using Latuda, talk with your doctor.

How can I keep track of my mood during my Latuda treatment?

The manufacturer of Latuda offers a daily mood monitor. Using this chart to track your mood over several weeks can help you and your doctor understand how Latuda is working for you.

If you have questions about how to fill out the daily mood monitor, ask your doctor.

It’s not known if Latuda is safe to take during pregnancy.

Latuda hasn’t been studied in pregnant women. However, movement disorders and withdrawal symptoms have occurred in babies born to pregnant women who were given Latuda during their last 3 months of pregnancy.

Examples of these movement disorders and withdrawal symptoms include:

  • agitation (feeling of being restless or bothered)
  • decreased or increased muscle tone
  • sleepiness
  • tremor
  • trouble breathing
  • trouble eating or refusal to eat certain foods

If you’re pregnant or planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of taking Latuda.

Pregnancy registry

The National Pregnancy Registry for Atypical Antipsychotics is currently collecting information on the safety of Latuda and similar drugs when used during pregnancy. If you’d like to learn more, visit the registry website or talk with your doctor.

Latuda and fertility

Based on animal studies, taking Latuda may lead to fertility problems (trouble conceiving a child) for some women. However, animal studies don’t always predict what will happen in humans.

If you and your partner are planning a pregnancy, talk with your doctor before starting Latuda treatment.

It’s not known if Latuda is safe to take during pregnancy. If you’re sexually active and you or your partner can become pregnant, talk with your doctor about your birth control needs while you’re using Latuda.

For more information about taking Latuda during pregnancy, see the “Latuda and pregnancy” section above.

It’s not known if Latuda can pass into breast milk. If you’re breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed, talk with your doctor about the risks and benefits of using Latuda.

You should take Latuda according to your doctor’s or healthcare provider’s instructions.

Latuda comes as a tablet that you swallow.

When to take

You’ll likely take Latuda once a day. You can take the medication at any time, but it needs to be at about the same time each day.

If you experience sleepiness as a side effect, the best time to take Latuda may be in the evenings before bedtime.

To help make sure that you don’t miss a dose, try setting a reminder on your phone. A medication timer may be useful, too.

Taking Latuda with food

You should take Latuda with food. Eating at least 350 calories when you take Latuda will help make sure your body absorbs enough of the drug.

Can Latuda be crushed, split, or chewed?

No, you shouldn’t crush, split, or chew Latuda. And you shouldn’t cut Latuda tablets in half. It’s important to swallow Latuda tablets whole.

Using more than the recommended dosage of Latuda can lead to serious side effects. Do not use more Latuda than your doctor recommends.

Overdose symptoms

Symptoms of an overdose can include:

What to do in case of overdose

If you think you’ve taken too much of this drug, call your doctor. You can also call the American Association of Poison Control Centers at 800-222-1222 or use their online tool. But if your symptoms are severe, call 911 or your local emergency number, or go to the nearest emergency room right away.

When used to treat major depressive episodes related to bipolar I disorder, Latuda may be used with the drugs lithium or valproate in adults. These drugs are types of mood stabilizers, and they help prevent bipolar mania (episodes during which you’re extremely energized and excited).

With bipolar I disorder, you have episodes of depression and mania. Latuda helps treat the episodes of depression, and a mood stabilizer helps with manic episodes.

Drugs in the antidepressant drug class, such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), may also be used to treat bipolar depression. A drug class is a group of medications that work in a similar way. However, Latuda shouldn’t be used with these antidepressants. Taking Latuda with these drugs may increase your risk of neuroleptic malignant syndrome. For more information, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.

If you have multiple mental health conditions, your doctor may recommend other medications in addition to Latuda. Talk with them to learn more.

As with all medications, the cost of Latuda can vary.

The actual price you’ll pay depends on your insurance plan, your location, and the pharmacy you use.

Before approving coverage for Latuda, your insurance company may require you to get prior authorization. This means that your doctor and insurance company will need to communicate about your prescription before the insurance company will cover the drug. The insurance company will review the prior authorization request and decide if the drug will be covered.

If you’re not sure if you’ll need to get prior authorization for Latuda, contact your insurance company.

Financial and insurance assistance

If you need financial support to pay for Latuda, or if you need help understanding your insurance coverage, help is available.

Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Inc., the manufacturer of Latuda, offers the Latuda Copay Savings Program. For more information and to find out if you’re eligible for support, call 855-5LATUDA (855-552-8832) or visit the program website.

Generic version

Latuda is available only as a brand-name medication. It’s not currently available in generic form. A generic drug is an exact copy of the active drug in a brand-name medication. Generics usually cost less than brand-name drugs.

This drug comes with several precautions.

FDA warnings

This drug has boxed warnings. A boxed warning is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). It alerts doctors and patients about drug effects that may be dangerous.

  • Risk of death in older adults with psychosis related to dementia. Latuda shouldn’t be used for the treatment of psychosis in older people with dementia. (Psychosis is a symptom of mental illness in which you lose touch with reality. And dementia refers to symptoms of problems with thinking, communication, and memory.) In some cases, antipsychoticdrugs such as Latuda can increase the risk of death when used in older adults who have psychosis related to dementia.
  • Suicidal thoughts and behaviors. In some cases, drugs (such as Latuda) used to treat depression can increase the risk of suicidal thoughts and actions in children and young adults. The risk is highest during the first 4 months of treatment. If you begin taking medication to treat depression while you’re taking Latuda, your doctor should monitor you for new or worsening suicidal thoughts or behaviors.

Other precautions

Before taking Latuda, talk with your doctor about your health history. Latuda may not be right for you if you have certain medical conditions or other factors affecting your health. These include:

  • Bipolar disorder. If you have a history of bipolar disorder, Latuda may increase your risk for mania or hypomania (periods of energy and excited behavior). Talk with your doctor about your risk for mania or hypomania while taking Latuda.
  • Parkinson’s disease or Lewy body dementia. People with Parkinson’s disease or Lewy body dementia are at an increased risk for side effects of Latuda. (See the “Latuda side effects” section above to learn more.) If you have either of these conditions, talk with your doctor about whether Latuda is safe for you to take.
  • Allergic reaction. If you’ve had an allergic reaction to Latuda or any of its ingredients, you shouldn’t take Latuda. Ask your doctor what other medications are better options for you.
  • Pregnancy. It’s not known if Latuda is safe to take during pregnancy. For more information, please see the “Latuda and pregnancy” section above.
  • Breastfeeding. It’s not known if Latuda can pass into breast milk during breastfeeding. For more information, please see the “Latuda and breastfeeding” section above.

Note: For more information about the potential negative effects of Latuda, see the “Latuda side effects” section above.

When you get Latuda from the pharmacy, the pharmacist will add an expiration date to the label on the bottle. This date is typically 1 year from the date they dispensed the medication.

The expiration date helps guarantee that the medication is effective during this time. The current stance of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is to avoid using expired medications. If you have unused medication that has gone past the expiration date, talk to your pharmacist about whether you might still be able to use it.

Storage

How long a medication remains good can depend on many factors, including how and where you store the medication.

You should store Latuda tablets at room temperature (77°F/25°C) in a tightly sealed container away from light. Avoid storing this medication in areas where it could get damp or wet, such as bathrooms.

Disposal

If you no longer need to take Latuda and have leftover medication, it’s important to dispose of it safely. This helps prevent others, including children and pets, from taking the drug by accident. It also helps keep the drug from harming the environment.

This article provides several useful tips on medication disposal. You can also ask your pharmacist for information on how to dispose of your medication.

The following information is provided for clinicians and other healthcare professionals.

Indications

Latuda is indicated for the treatment schizophrenia in adults as well as children ages 13 years and older. The drug is also indicated as monotherapy for the treatment of major depressive episodes associated with bipolar depression in adults as well as children ages 10 years and older, and as combination therapy with lithium or valproate for the same condition in adults.

Administration

Latuda is taken orally with food (at least 350 calories). Administration with food approximately doubles the body’s exposure to the drug and approximately triples the drug concentration.

Mechanism of action

Latuda’s classification is an atypical antipsychotic. The mechanism of action for atypical antipsychotics is not fully understood. Their therapeutic effect is thought to be mediated by antagonism of central dopamine and serotonin receptors.

Pharmacokinetics and metabolism

Latuda reaches peak serum concentrations within 1 to 3 hours after dosing. Steady-state concentrations are achieved within 7 days of beginning treatment with the drug. The half-life of Latuda is 18 hours. The drug is metabolized via the CYP3A4 enzyme and is excreted primarily in the feces.

Contraindications

Latuda is contraindicated for use in people with known hypersensitivity to the drug. It’s also contraindicated for use with strong CYP3A4 inhibitors and inducers.

Misuse, withdrawal, and dependence

People who took Latuda in clinical studies did not demonstrate any drug-seeking behaviors. However, the central nervous system activity of Latuda suggests the drug may have misuse potential. People who have misused drugs in the past and are taking Latuda should be monitored for signs of drug misuse or abuse.

Abrupt discontinuation of Latuda may result in withdrawal symptoms. Prior to discontinuation, people taking Latuda should be slowly tapered off the medication and monitored for signs of withdrawal.

Storage

Latuda tablets should be stored at room temperature (77°F/25°C). Deviations are allowed from 59°F to 86°F (15°C to 30°C).

Disclaimer: Medical News Today has made every effort to make certain that all information is factually correct, comprehensive, and up to date. However, this article should not be used as a substitute for the knowledge and expertise of a licensed healthcare professional. You should always consult your doctor or other healthcare professional before taking any medication. The drug information contained herein is subject to change and is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, warnings, drug interactions, allergic reactions, or adverse effects. The absence of warnings or other information for a given drug does not indicate that the drug or drug combination is safe, effective, or appropriate for all patients or all specific uses.